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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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    • Hewson, Mary Stevenson
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Hewson, Mary Stevenson" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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ALS : Yale University Library I thank you for your kind Letter of April 11th. It grieves me that the present Situation of publick Affairs, makes it not eligible for you to come hither with your Family, because I am sure you would otherwise like this Country, and might provide better here for your Children, at the same time that I should be made more happy by your Neighbourhood and Company. I...
ALS : Yale University Library Figure to yourself an old Man with grey Hair appearing under a Martin Fur Cap, among the Powder’d Heads of Paris. It is this odd Figure that salutes you; with Handfuls of Blessings on you and your dear little ones. On my Arrival here, Mlle. Biheron gave me great Pleasure in the Perusal of a Letter from you to her. It acquainted me that you and yours were well in...
AL : Yale University Library I wrote a few Lines to you by Dr. B. and have since seen your Letter to Jona. by which I have the great Pleasure of learning that you and yours were well on the 17th. What is become of my and your dear Dolly? Have you parted? for you mention nothing of her. I know your Friendship continues; but perhaps she is with one of her Brothers. How do they all do? I have not...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society I am sometimes apprehensive that my not Writing to you, may give you some Pain: but I have fear’d on the other hand that my Writing might subject you to greater Pain. Yet I cannot forbear desiring to know how you do from time to time, & wishing that you should know my Love for you & yours continues unchang’d and unchangeable. I have also great...
ALS (draft): American Philosophical Society Your kind Letter of May 30. 79. came to my hands but a few days since, by Dr Ingenhausz, who has also brought the Milk pot. The Copper Vessel I received long ago. I hear that your Affairs are settled to your Satisfaction, on which I congratulate you with sincere Pleasure. You end your Letter with this endearing Expression of Friendship, “ I wish we...
LS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress My dear old Friends will think I forgot them, if they do not hear from me now & then. They may be assured that my Friendship & Affection is unalterable, and that I long much to see & embrace them once more before I die— I thank Polly for the Prints of Mr. Hewson, which I think are like.— I wish that she would lay out the 4½ Guineas...
Reprinted from Stan V. Henkels, Catalogue No. 1262 (July 1, 1920), item 31; and American Art Association, Sale Catalogue (April 22–4, 1924), item 295. I received your kind Letter of the 23d of December. I rejoice always to hear of your & your good Mother’s Welfare, tho’ I can write but Seldom, Safe Opportunities are Scarce. Looking over some old Papers I find the rough Draft of a Letter which...
ALS : Yale University Library I wrote to you, my dear dear Friends, very lately, and directed my Letter to Cheem in Surrey. Mr Whitefoord tells me that you are removed to Kensington Square, and I fear that my Letter may therefore not find you. I sent it under Cover to Mr William Hodgson, Mercht in Coleman street, which I mention that in case it has not come to hand, you may there enquire for...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I received your very kind Letter by Mr. Whitefoord, with the Books, which I think a judicious Collection, and hope the Reading of them by my Grandson may have a good Effect, in rendring him more worthy of the Happiness you are providing for him, in the Education of your Daughter. I suppose the Letter I had sent to you before Mr Whitefoord came here the...
ALS : Yale University Library I received your pleasing Letter of the 1st of May thro’ the hands of Mr Hodgson, and one since by Mr Oswald. You cannot be more pleas’d in talking about your Children, your Methods of Instructing them, and the Progress they make, than I am in hearing it; and in finding, that instead of following the idle Amusements, which both your Fortune & the Custom of the Age...