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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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    • Hartley, David

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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Hartley, David"
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ALS : British Library; copy: William L. Clements Library The Bearer having been detain’d here, I add this Line to suggest, that if the new Ministry are dispos’d to enter into a General Treaty of Peace, Mr Laurens being set intirely at Liberty may receive such Propositions as they shall think fit to make relative to Time, Place, or any other Particulars, and come hither with them. He is...
LS , copy, and transcript: Library of Congress My Dear Friends late Letters have been long in coming, having met some Delay on the Way. I am told the Communication is now more open. As Captain Tattwell cannot now perform his Engagement specifically by procuring the Release of Captain Harris and his Crew, I think he may be discharged of his Parole by obtaining the Release of some other Captain...
Copy: Library of Congress I received your favour of the 24th. past wherein you have taken the Pains to rectify a Mistake of mine relating to the Aim of your Letters. I accept kindly your Explication and hope you will excuse my error when you reflect, that I know of no Consent given by France to our treating separately for Peace, and that there has been mixt in most of your Conversations &...
ALS : National Maritime Museum I am glad to learn by your Favour of the 19th past, the good Disposition of the Board who are to manage the Exchange. They may depend on the fairest and most candid Proceeding on the Part of the Commissioners here. Our Agent at Nantes, whose Name you desire, is Mr Schweighauser, a Noted Merchant there, who does our Business by Sub-Agents in the other Ports of...
AL : D. A. F. H. H. Hartley Russell (1955), on deposit in the Berkshire Record Office This note is the first extant communication between Franklin and a man who, as correspondent and eventually as peace negotiator, was destined to play a considerable part in his life. David Hartley ( c. 1730–1813), the son of a physician-philosopher well known in his day, was a close friend of Sir George...
ALS and copy: Library of Congress I am glad to learn by the Newspapers that you got safe home, where I hope you found all well. I wish to know whether your Ministers have yet come to a Resolution to exchange the Prisoners they hold in England, according to the Expectations formerly given you. We have here above two hundred who are confin’d in the Drake, where they must be kept, as we have not...
LS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress; transcripts: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives I have just received your Favour of the 3d. Instant. I thank you much for the good News you give me, that “an Order is issued by your Government for the Release of all the American Prisoners everywhere , an Order not partial or conditional , but general and absolute...
Copy: William L. Clements Library I have this moment recd your favour of the 25th past acquainting me with the change in administration. I am sure that in reforming the Constitution wch is sometimes talked of, it wd not be better to make your great offices of State hereditary, than to suffer the inconvenience of such frequent & total changes. Much Faction & Cabal wd be prevented, by having a...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 428. I received the letter you did me the honour of writing to me requesting a recommendation to America of Mr. Joshua Grigby. I have accordingly written one; and having an opportunity the other day, I sent it under cover to Mr. Benjamin Vaughan. The...
AL (draft): Library of Congress I have this Day received your Favours per Capt. Falconer, of which more in my next. With this I send you a number of Newspapers and Pamphlets, by which you will see Things are become serious here. Your Nation must stop short, and change its Measures, or she will lose the Colonies for ever. The Burning of Towns, and firing from Men of War on defenceless Cities...