You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Franklin, Benjamin
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 2581-2601 of 2,601 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 87
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Extract printed in Benjamin Vaughan, ed., Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces . . . Written by Benj. Franklin . . . (London, 1779), pp. 552–4. The Congress met at a time when all minds were so exasperated by the perfidy of General Gage, and his attack on the country people, that propositions of attempting an accommodation were not much relished; and it has been with difficulty...
ALS : Yale University Library I received with great Pleasure my dear Friends very kind Letter of April 19, as it informed me of his Welfare, and that of the amiable Family in Jermyn Street. I am much obliged by the Information of what pass’d in Parliament after my departure; in return I will endeavor to give you a short Sketch of the State of Affairs here. I found at my arrival all America...
ALS : Library of Congress; copy: Pierpont Morgan Library This famous letter was unquestionably not sent. The positive evidence is that the original remained with Franklin’s papers. The negative evidence is that Strahan later gave no sign that he had received such a blast: when he responded on September 6 to a letter, now lost, from Franklin two days after this one, and when he wrote again on...
ALS (draft): American Philosophical Society Pay the Ballance of my Account to John Sargent Esqr. whose Receipt shall be your Discharge. I am, Gentlemen Your old Friend and humble Servant Why BF wrote as of London the reader must guess. No record of this transaction appears in his Jour. or Ledger, and all we know about it is contained in the note itself and in the following document. The...
ALS (draft): American Philosophical Society I have written to Messrs. Browns and Collinson to pay the Ballance of my Acct to you; and I beg you to take the Trouble of receiving and keeping it for me, or my Children. It may possibly soon be all I shall have left: as my American Property consists chiefly of Houses in our Seaport Towns, which your Ministry have begun to burn, and I suppose are...
Copy: American Philosophical Society I received your kind congratulations with infinite pleasure, as I learn by them that you and yours are well. I long much to see once more my native Country, and my friends there, and none more than my dear Caty and her family. Mr. Green I hope will allow an old man of 70 to say he loves his wife, it is an innocent affection. I have great Obligations to him...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I wrote to you some time since, having heard from one of the Delegates that you were at Warwick, and I supposed it must be with that good Family, so I directed my Letter to you there; I hope you receiv’d it. I have since received your kind Letter of May 14. with one from dear Mrs. Green. I sympathise most sincerely with you and the People of my native Town...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I wonder’d it was so long before I heard from you. The Packet it seems was brought down to Philadelphia, and carry’d back to Burlington before it came hither. I am glad to learn by your Letters that you are happy in your new Situation, and that tho’ you ride out sometimes, you do not neglect your Studies. You are now in that time of Life which is the...
Extract: Papers of the Earl of Dartmouth deposited in the Staffordshire County Record Office I have just received your Favor of April 5. giving me an Account of the Progress of my Suit. I called at your House just before I came away to settle Matters with You, and it was no small Disappointment to me that I did not meet with You. I did then propose returning in October, but I find Things here...
ALS : Moravian Archives, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania I am much oblig’d by your kind Congratulations on my Return; and I rejoice to hear that the Brethren are well and prosper. I am persuaded that the Congress will give no Encouragement to any to molest your People on Account of their Religious Principles; and tho’ much is not in my Power, I shall on every Occasion exert my self to discountenance...
Unfinished draft: Library of Congress During his voyage to Philadelphia Franklin made the observations on the sea that appear above under April 10. On May 16 he promised in a letter to Priestley to communicate to him “a valuable philosophical discovery” that he had made on the voyage; years later William Temple Franklin conjectured, in a note on that letter, that the discovery was related to...
ALS : Marietta College Library; copy: Harvard University Library I have just now heard by Mr. Adams, that you are come out of Boston, and are at Warwick in Rhodeisland Government: I suppose it must be at good Mr. and Mrs. Green’s, to whom present my affectionate Respects. I write this Line just to let you know I am return’d well from England; that I found my Family well; but have not found the...
Reprinted from William Darlington, Memorials of John Bartram and Humphry Marshall . . . (Philadelphia, 1849), p. 521. I received your favour of the 13th inst. I think, with you, that the non-importation and non-exportation, well adhered to, will end the controversy in our favour. But, as Britain has begun to use force, it seems absolutely necessary that we should be prepared to repel force by...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; draft: American Philosophical Society I have just now been urged to apply to you in behalf of a Stranger who is suppos’d to have spoken some disrespectful Words of you, and who is apprehensive of the Resentment of your Company, as he is told they are exceedingly exasperated against him. He declares that the Words ascrib’d to him, are much...
Printed in Benjamin Vaughan, ed., Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces . . . Written by Benj. Franklin . . . (London, 1779), pp. 550–1. You will have heard before this reaches you, of a march stolen by the regulars into the country by night, and of their expedition back again. They retreated 20 miles in [6] hours. The Governor had called the Assembly to propose Lord North’s...
ALS : Central Library, Sheffield The background of this letter was conversations between the two men during Franklin’s last months in London. Burke’s record of their final meeting, even though not committed to paper until years later, is revealing enough to be worth extensive quotation. “As far as a man, so locked up as Dr. Franklin, could be expected to communicate his ideas, I believe he...
ALS : Yale University Library I arrived here well the 5th. after a pleasant Passage of 6 Weeks. I met with a most cordial Reception, I should say from all Parties, but that all Parties are now extinguish’d here. Britain has found means to unite us. I had not been here a Day before I was unanimously elected by our Assembly a Delegate to the Congress, which met the 10th and is now sitting. All...
ALS : Mrs. Arthur Loeb, Philadelphia (1955) This short letter is tantalizingly uninformative. It touches on the two personal relationships that were in crisis when Franklin returned to America, with his son and with his oldest political ally; but it throws little light on either. Its contents make clear that it was in answer to a letter now missing, in which Galloway congratulated Franklin on...
ALS : Harvard University Library I arrived here on Friday Evening, and the next morning was unanimously chosen by the General Assembly a Delegate for the ensuing Congress, which is to meet on Wednesday. You will have heard before this reaches you of the Commencement of a Civil War; the End of it perhaps neither myself, nor you, who are much younger, may live to see. I find here all Ranks of...
ALS : Darmouth Dartmouth College Library What as far as we know was the first letter Franklin wrote after landing was not to his son or sister or some close friend, as might be expected, but to an Englishman who three months earlier seems to have been no more than a casual acquaintance. In late February, when Hartley asked for information, Franklin furnished it in a formal, third-person note,...
Printed in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society . . ., II (1786), 325. On his voyage to America Franklin was wondering about the sea around him. Soon after setting down his speculation on the speed of ships (the preceding document) he, or perhaps his grandson under his direction, began to record the temperature of the water. For the first four days it varied little, and perhaps...