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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I have just received your Favour of the 18th. I thank you for the Steps you took with the Duke of Dorset, and with Mr. Adams; and hope they will prove effectual. I arrived here extreamly well, not at all hurt or fatigued by the Carriage I us’d, which I found generally very gentle. I embark this Evening for Cowes with Mr. Houdon. I have seen that M. du Plessis twice. He appears a Man of some...
I have lately received your Favour of Dec. 23. The Diplomas I hope are got to hand before this time. I am much oblig’d by your taking care of my Encyclopedie. Mr. Hopkinson will account with you for it. I am glad to learn that every thing is quiet in Europe, and like to continue so. I hope the same will be the case here; tho’ Boutdefeus are not wanting among us, who by inflammatory Writings in...
Mr. Franklin presents his respectful Compliments to Mr. Jefferson, and requests he would be so good as to ask either of the Imperial and Sardinian Ambassadors the Favour of forwarding the enclos’d Letters, of which they will make no Difficulty. Mr. F. also recommends Dr. Ingenhauss to Mr. Jefferson, as a proper Correspondent in case he should have any thing to insinuate to that Court. Dr. F’s...
Mr. Hopkinson has communicated to me a Letter of yours with a Proposal of a Mr. Pissot’s respecting his Editions of English Books. I am much oblig’d by your thinking of my Grandson on this Occasion; And if Mr. Pissot will send over a Dozen of each Work as a Trial, I will take Care that the Terms propos’d shall be punctually comply’d with. Our Disputes here about the new Constitution are...
These People are so accustomed to see every thing done by Sollicitation of Interest, or what they call Protection, and nothing without it, that they hardly conceive it possible to obtain the Payment even of a just Debt but by means of Persons whom they suppose to have Influence enough to support and enforce their Pretensions. We should naturally suppose that the proper time for asking such Aid...
I obey with Pleasure the Order of the Philosophical Society, in transmitting to you the enclos’d Proof of their Respect for you, and of the honour they have done themselves, in chusing you one of their Members. With this you will receive several Diplomas for foreign Gentlemen in different Parts of Europe, which I imagine you may convey to them thro’ the Ministers of different Courts residing...
Mr. Frazer , who will have the honour of delivering this Line to your Excellency, is a Gentleman of respectable Character here, and as such I beg leave to recommend him to your Civilities. He has in France a young Sister, who was left there some time since in a Convent for Improvement in her Education, and has it seems been seduc’d to resolve on remaining there; and on abandoning her Relations...
I take this Opportunity of sending you another Copy of the propos’d new federal Constitution, and of acquainting you that the Box containing the Encyclopedia for me and Mr. Hopkinson is just come to hand in good Order. With great Respect and Esteem I am, Your Excellency’s most obedient & most humble Servant, RC ( DLC ). Not recorded in SJL but entered in SJL Index and, therefore, probably...
Dr. Franklin requests Mr. Jefferson to do what he thinks is proper on the subject of the Letter inclosed, and afterwards to make answer to the writer. RC ( DLC ); in William Temple Franklin’s hand. Enclosure not identified.
I received your Favour of Oct. 5. by Messrs. Fitzhughs, with the Letters and Pacquets you were so kind as to forward to me by those Gentlemen, who have winter’d with us, and are but lately set out for Virginia. I will read du Plessis’s Papers as soon as I can find a little time; and say some thing of them in a future Letter. As to public Affairs, the Congress has not been able to assemble more...