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    • Dearborn, Henry
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Dearborn, Henry" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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I have the honour of inclosing the orders of Govr. Strong, which are as I understand to be considered as a substitute for a compliance with my request for turning out a body of Militia as stated in my Letter of the 5 th Inst. to the Department of War, by the inclosed orders no provision is made for the defence of any part of the District of Maine where the Enemy are now in considerable force....
I confidently hope that the Campaign that has now closed, has afforded sufficient evidence of the necessary of having a regular Army fully competent for all offensive opperations, from fifteen to twenty additional Regiments, ought in my opinnion, to be raised North of the Potomack, what additional force will be necessary to the South, & west, I have found no opinnion. If an adaquate force...
I have received no direct accounts from Norfolk or its vicinity since you left this place, and as I wrote early to Mr. Newton, requesting him to be good enough to communicate all occurrences of any importance, I presume nothing has taken place deserving of notice. If Adml. Berkley was a favourite of the Fox party, as stated by some who pretend to know, and was sent on the Halifax station by...
Unless the Troops destined for Detroit & Niagara, with those on the Eastern shore of Lake Ontario & Upper St Lawrence, aided by the Naval Preparations, now commencing in that quarter, shall be fortunate enough to penetrate Upper Canada, before winter sets in, we shall have the credit of an unfortunate Campaign. After it become [ sic ] necessary to detach a large proportion of the regular...
§ From Henry Dearborn. 29 September 1815, Farrese Inn, Green Spring. “Mrs. Dearborn & myself are on our way to Monticello, we intended paying our respects to yourself and Mrs Madison previous to our visit at Monticello, but being anxious to reach the end of our journey while the good weather continues & before the roads became worse, we have concluded to pass on, and to take the liberty of...
I should not take the liberty of addressing the following observations to yourself; had I not recently heard that the Secretary of War is very unwell. The Court Martial for the trial of Genl. Wilkinson has been in session twenty three days, and for the want of the principle witnesses on the part of the prosecution, no witnesses have yet been examined, the Judge Advocate having declined...
I take the liberty of observing to you that Col Jona Russell of Providence is now here and about sailing for Toninggen, and if no Consul has been appointed for that place Col Russel would be pleased with the appointment, and as his Character is well known to you I presume you will with pleasure confer the appointment desired. If you should think proper to make the appointment, and will please...
Notwithstanding all the objections that have been made to gunboats, they are now call’d for, and I am fully persuaded that they may afford more security and protection to our extensive Seacoast than can be given by any other means we possess. There ought to be at least from sixty to seventy, on the Coast of New England, we have, a great number of ports & harbours with Towns & vilages,...
I was this morning honored with your letter of the 11th. Inst. I trust Sir that you will believe me when I say that I do not possess a sufficient degree of either vanity or ambition to induce me to desire such Military rank or command, as Gentlemen of superior tallents & Information only might aspire to, but to prevent any unnecessary delay or embarrasment, I will suspend any remarks in...
The result of our Elections has given our political opponants the intire direction of our State Government for the present year, what use they will make of the power they possess is uncertain, moderation or prudence, belongs not to their political character, they may however; for once, consider it expedient to attempt some restraint on their feelings & dispositions, I fear they will, but if...
From the unequivocal and positive order received from the Secretary of War, (a copy of which I take the liberty of enclosing) I had no option but implicit obedience. My health had so far improved as to enable me to reassume the command on the 26th. of June, of which I notified the Secretary of War. I received a letter from the Secretary of War dated May 27th. in which I was informed that Majr....
¶ From Henry Dearborn. Letter not found. 13 May 1825. Calendared as a one-page letter in the lists probably made by Peter Force ( DLC : series 7, box 2).