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    • Coxe, Tench
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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[…] 10 To abolish the drawbacks of the foreign or impost duty upon all manufactures from grain, upon butter, cheese, wet provisions, oil, whalebone, fish. (Quere, also the manufactures from wood). 11 To abolish the draw backs of the foreign or impost Duty upon all manufactures necessary in the building, equipping, or repairing of merchant Vessels and Ships of war (or at least certain of them)...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to inform Mr. Jefferson that Dutch Bills remain difficult to procure, and that English Bills can be obtained at 162½ ⅌ Ct. being a Discount of £4.3.4 Curry. upon the £100 Stg. Mr. Coxe continues to think it extremely hazardous to remit by bills on Holland. Indeed he takes the liberty to say he would by no means risque them. Mr. Jefferson will be able to procure such part...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to inclose to Mr. Jefferson one of the most striking productions he has ever read. The Author fled from the place in which it was written and has become an inhabitant of the U.S. Mr. Coxe has promised to return it carefully. He is very sorry to inform Mr. Jefferson that the Pragers are not drawing nor can he find any Bills on Holland. He had some communication with Mr....
In the course of my reflexions on the subject on which I had the honor in my last letter respectfully to address you, it has occurred to me, that it is in my power to submit to you an unsought and decided evidence of public opinion in a republican circle. I beg leave to assure you, that the original letter to me, from which the inclosed is faithfully extracted is in my possession. It will...
[ Philadelphia, 3 Sep. 1787 . Recorded in SJL as received 13 Dec. 1787. Not found.]
Mr. Coxe has the honor to inform Mr. Jefferson, that the silver crown of six livres Tournois is worth in the French W. Indies nine livres of the Colonies and that the livre Tournois according to the par of french coins is deemed conformable with that fact—that is 30s. of the Colonies are worth 20s. of France. Mr. C. will read the letter with care and have the honor to return it in person to...
A large mail was received yesterday at the Treasury office in which was contained the enclosed letter. Presuming upon the care of the postmaster I did not look at the Superscription of the letter with much attention, and opened it as if to the Secretary of the Treasury. On reaching the 3d. or 4th. line, which has relation to a subject unconnected with the business of this department I was led...
The idea I lately took the liberty to suggest may have appeared visionary and strange, but on much reflexion I am convinced that it is the interest of the United States that such a measure should be adopted either by the Government, or by the mercantile interest varying the form of course so as to render it proper for them. I beg leave to submit the reasons. We are now dependent upon one...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to inform Mr. Jefferson, that no plat, or draught of the seven ranges is to be found in the Treasury, nor do any of the gentlemen remember to have seen one. It appears highly probable that such a paper accompanied the Report of the Board to Congress, and that it may be on the old files of the late Secy. of Congress (Mr. Thompson) or possibly in the War office, as the...
H. Miller. Muhlbg No. 1. H. M. Supervisor of the Reve. Latimer No. 2. The collector of the Customs, Phila. Mc.pherson N. 3. The naval officer, Philada. Jackson N. 4. The Surveyor of the port of Phila. T.Ross } Coxe Ashe N. 5 The
I have the honor to inclose you a return of the piscatory articles exported from the United States in one year, one month, and ten days, excepting fourteen quarterly returns from twelve ports which have not yet been received. Among these are Boston, Newyork Charleston and five small ports of Massachusetts and Main. From the irregular Manner in which the first returns were made it was...
The vacancy produced in the Treasury department by the death of the Comptroller has occasioned me to take the liberty of making this communication to you. It will not appear unnatural, that a person in my situation should be led, by the relation the offices of the Treasury bear to each other, to entertain a wish for the appointment, and I should, at as early a moment as decorum permitted, have...
It is manifest to every person, who reflects on the affairs of the United States, that the present season rather offers a new, than a defective mass of commercial advantages. The acquisition of a large monied capital, and of a universal credit, public & private, have relieved us from the British monopoly, or at least afforded the sure means and this is a revolution in trade . To give activity...
Cotton The present crisis again draws into consideration the important agricultural production which is the subject of the inclosed pages. It is the interest of the United States to consider at this juncture, the domestic means of supply. If war is to ensue, or the principle of our non importation law is to be maintained or extended, manufactures are rendered proportionally necessary to our...
The situation of the United States has become very uncomfortable, and presents disagreeable prospects as to revenue, internal order & harmony, foreign trade, supplies and the maintenance of peace. It is a time for every honest latitude in the freedom of discussion. When public authority is present and entirely respected , the faithful and well disposed citizen may disclose his hopes &...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to inform Mr. Jefferson, that the House of Pragers are not drawing at this time. They expect advices of Shipments from Virginia in which event they will draw. Mr. Jacob G. Koch a dutch house is drawing at 3/—or 36/90 of a dollar ⅌ Guilder, but tho Mr. Coxe does not doubt his goodness, he cannot say he knows enough to induce a decided recommendation. Mr. Vaughan expresses...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to inclose to the Secretary of State the account of all the payments for lands, which have been made to the United States prior to this day being Drs. 687,563 70/100. The contract for land intended to have been made between the United States and Messrs. Flint and Parker, as will appear by reference to their letter of 18th. Octr. 1787 and to the resolution of Congress of...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to enclose to the Secretary of State a letter from the Attorney Genl. of the Bahamas to Mr. C’s brother, who had written to him upon some business of the Vessels of the U.S. taken into Providence. Mr. J. D. Coxe wishes, that a knowledge of Mr. Franks’s communication may be confined to the principal Officers of the Government, and that the letter may be returned in the...
I take the liberty of mentioning to you that I am informed Genl. Muhlenberg has given to one of the assistants in his office a declaration on writing, that he is willing to retire from the Collectorship. Under this circumstance, I hope it will not be deemed indelicate in me to ask the honor of your consideration as a candidate for such vacancy. As the office has a direct relation to the...
Mr. Coxe has the honor to enclose to Mr. Jefferson some notes upon navigation marked [A] which he prepared at the request of the Chairman on the Navigation Committee. That subject being now refer’d to Mr. Jefferson by the house of representatives Mr. Coxe takes the liberty of depositing these papers with him in the hope that they may be of some use. Mr. C. also has the honor to enclose a...
I had the honor to inclose you some time ago a letter from the hon. Jas. Maddison Jr. Esqr. of Virga. and at the same time mentioned that a little time would necessarily elapse before I could have the pleasure of explaining myself on the business, which induced me to take the liberty of troubling you. The person who presents this to you, Mr. Andw. Mitchell will take the liberty of requesting...
I do myself the honor to transmit to you the pamphlet on the Colony Commerce of Great Britain , which you were so kind as to lend me. It was not untill six oClock yesterday afternoon, that I could find it, when I was sorry to learn you had set out, as it was my intention to have paid my respects to you before your departure. I beg your acceptance of the other pamphlet , which will be found in...
I have the honor to return to You the Opinion (of the 3d. instant,) prepared for the President, on the subject of the Sea-letters, to which my instructions shall conform. Applications for these documents having been made by Merchants of Philadelphia, for Vessels lying in several other Ports, I thought it best to transmit by yesterday’s Southern and Northern Mails a few of the letters to...
I wrote by the mail of last evening in reply to your letter of the 17th. that the two places might not be left unattended to. The offer made to me, certain parts of your letter & a publication in the Washington Intelligencer , I think of the 12th., have caused serious reflexions in my mind. I am perfectly acquainted with the sentiments of Pennsa. on one side & I think well informed on the...
You are one of the last persons to whom it is necessary to observe how comfortable are the exchanges of the heart among those who are united in principles at once virtuous and noble. I feel all that belong to such circumstances in the perusal of your letter of the 13 th ult o It is true that I aspired to be the fellow laborer (juvenile and modest) with superior men. I have been amply repaid by...
Mr. T. Coxe requests that Mr. Jefferson will do him the honor to inform him, whether it appears by the records of the Department of State that a commission, as Inspector of the Revenue for the port of Balte., has been transmitted to Danl. Delozier , lately appointed Surveyor of that port. Mr. Coxe can not find that such a commission has ever been received by the officer, or by the Treasury. In...
I have the pleasure of your letter by Dr. B . and feel great pleasure at the partial measures, which you inform me have been taken. As much is done here for the time in the other parts of the affair as I expected, and no deficiency in any respect will take place on the part of the person here on that day that half of what you mention shall arrive. I wish Dr. B had brought Me three, or even one...
When I had the pleasure of my last interview with you, it was mentioned, that two gentlemen would see me upon the Business, which had been the subject of our previous conferences . But from that time to this I have never heard from or seen either them or any other person on that interesting business. I have no knowledge of what is proposed to be done, but every day convinces me not merely of...
I have for some time entertained an opinion that it would be an useful Service to the United States to demonstrate to every man of Candor in the British Nation the very great errors and deviations from fact, which are to be found in Lord Sheffields pamphlet. I have also believed that it would inspire confidence in the minds of our countrymen, and of the foreign nations, who are in alliance...
Your letters for Mr. Pinckney, Mr. Monroe &ca. were all carefully forwarded. I should have given you this information before, but I wanted to send you the four papers (in the enclosed pamphlets) under the Signature of “ Juricola .” I have said to individuals, without reserve, in public and private life, that they were mine, as I have no more reserve in discussions thro the press, than in a...