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I did not until a few days ago receive your Letter of the 26th of March, and I pray you to be assured that its contents shall receive my careful attention. Mr. Briggs is now in this City, and in the Course of a few days the Location and Survey on the Canal of Carondelet, will be made under his immediate direction; and the result shall be transmitted to you without delay. I do not know, that on...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 28 May 1806, New Orleans. “I pray you to lay before the President of the United States, the inclosed letters from Messrs. Destréhan and Sauvé, resigning their Seats in the Legislative Council; together with copies of my answers thereto. Colonel Bellechasse had also written his letter of resignation—but has since been induced not to forward it. “The services of...
16 June 1804, New Orleans. “I have the Honour to enclose you an estimate of the expense which will attend the support of the Government of the Orleans Territory for one year ensuing the 1st of October next. “The Council being appointed by the President, and their ⅌ diem allowance fixed by a Law of Congress, I have supposed their pay would be drawn from the Treasury of the United States; but I...
Captain Turner, the commanding officer at Fort Adams has just arrived. He tells me that by letters from General Wilkinson dated at Pensacola on the 27th of last month, he learns that in three days the General was to set out from that place by the way of New Orleans for Fort Adams, and would probably arrive there on to morrow. Captain Turner adds that all the troops at Fort Adams in sufficient...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 8 May 1806, New Orleans. “I enclose for your perusal, a copy of a Bill which had passed the two houses of the Legislature; together with a Copy of a message, notifying my disapprobation thereto. “This subject has occasioned much conversation in this place, and is made by some, a ground of complaint against me. As this affair may probably be misrepresented at the...
I have the honor to inclose you a duplicate copy of my letter of the 13. Instant. The Citizens recommended as Councillors are, for the most part, men of Talents and Integrity; indeed, with the exception of Mr. Jones, there is not one whose appointment would give me regret; but having witnessed the unfriendly disposition of this Gentleman to the American Government, I should be sorry to see him...
24 November 1804, New Orleans. “A Letter I have just received from Captain Turner the Commandant at Natchitoches informs of the return to that Post of certain Negroes that had escaped to Nacogdoches: The recent conduct of the Spanish Authorities on the occasion is such as I could wish, and may in some measure be attributed to the prompt interference of the Marquis of Casa Calvo. “The News from...
I am now relieved from fever, but am so enfebled that I cannot complete the Journey, which I had contemplated;—Instead of visiting the Country on the Mississippi, as high as Natchez which was originally my intention, I shall pass over to Atakapas & Opelousas, where I shall breathe a healthy air, & where probably my health will soon be restored. The Route by water to Attakapas will be...
14 April 1804, New Orleans. “I now enclose you the answer of the Marquis De Casa Calvo to my letter of the 28th ultimo. Having obtained for my own use a translation of the Marquis’s letter and the documents accompanying it, I have forwarded to you, the originals.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 59, TP , Orleans, vol. 4); letterbook copy ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive Journal, vol. 13). RC 1 p.;...
20 May 1804, New Orleans. “The Treaty ceding Louisiana to Spain in 1762 and her act of acceptance I have not been able to meet with among any of the records in this City. In the Archives of the Cabildo (now in possession of the Municipality) I find no traces of any events prior to the arrival of General O’Reilly. “The proceedings of the Supreme Council of New Orleans (under the Government of...
This City continues the Seat of Disease:—On the 16th. Instant died of the prevailing fever my private Secretary Joseph Briggs, on yesterday Mr. John Gelston late of New-York, and on this Morning Mr. Benjamin West late of Philadelphia.— My own family is heavily afflicted; Mrs. Claiborne continues ill, and her Brother (Mr. Lewis) is expected to die in the course of the Day.—The distress of the...
7 December 1803, Fort Adams. “Yesterday evening and until about noon this day we had so heavy a fall of rain as greatly to retard our embarkation. The General however expects that we shall be able to proceed in the course of tomorrow. “I understand that there is a small corps of rifle men on their way hither from Jefferson County. But I should Suppose that the volunteers already here together...
A Mail from Washington, by the way of Fort Stoddart arrived on this morning, but has brought me no official Communications. Mr. Julien Poydras, (who is avowedly friendly to the General and local Administration) has been elected by the Territorial Legislature a Delegate to Congress, for the ensuing two years; Doctor Watkins, was the candidate in opposition & is understood here, to have received...
25 November 1802, Natchez. Encloses “an Original Copy of a Communication (together with a translation thereof)” received “this morning” from the governor general of Louisiana, in answer to Claiborne’s 28 Oct. letter. Letterbook copy and copy of enclosure ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive Journal); Tr ( DNA : RG 233, President’s Messages, 7A-D1); Tr of enclosure ( DLC : Jefferson Papers)....
19 November 1809, New Orleans. His official letters to Gallatin will give details of the rascality of William Brown, the local customs collector who has absconded with a large sum of public money. The office thus vacated is lucrative, and the collector can reside a mile from the city during the summer so that “he may calculate on enjoying health.” Sounded out Benjamin Morgan to see if he would...
I have the honor to inclose you, a copy of Some Resolutions which have been adopted by the Legislative Council and House of Representatives of this Territory, in consequence of my message of the 10th. Instant. You will perceive by these documents, that the power of suspending the privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus, is supposed not be vested in the Territorial Legislature; an opinion which...
1 October 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to introduce to your acquaintance Messrs. Derbigney, Sauve, and Detrahan, and to request that you would be so obliging as to present them to the President. These Gentlemen have been selected by many of their fellow Citizens to bear a Memorial to Congress, which treats upon subjects interesting to Louisiana, and to make such explanations as may be...
I have the honor to enclose you a paper containing a late Report of the Adjutant General of this Territory upon the subject of the militia ; It will shew you the great difficulty which will attend the rendering of that force efficient.— Assured as I am, that in your retirement the welfare of your Country will be most dear to you, I shall do myself the pleasure from time to time, to acquaint...
The letter from the American Commissioners will inform you that we are now in possession of this City; and I hasten to inform you of the measures which I have taken as Governor of Louisiana. A proclamation of which the enclosed is a copy was issued by me immediately after the surrender of the province. You will observe that it is silent concirning the Militia (a subject deeply interesting to...
20 December 1803, New Orleans. “We have the satisfaction to announce to you, that the province of Louisiana was this day surrendered to the United States by the Commissioner of France; and to add that the flag of our Country was raised in this City amidst the acclamations of the inhabitants. “The enclosed is a copy of an instrument of writing which was signed and exchanged by the Commissioners...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 10 August 1805, New Orleans . “I now transmit you a Copy of the Marquis’s answer (marked No 1) to my Letter of the 3rd. Inst. You will perceive Sir, that Morales has authority to continue his Sales in West Florida; that he contemplates residing in this City, and proposes to issue Official orders from hence , as Intendant of East and West Florida . I consider a...
The special messenger whom I despatched to New Orleans on the 18th instant, returned this evening, and brought with him the enclosed communications from Mr Clark and M. Laussat. The French officer, M. Landais, whose arrival at New Orleans was so much wished for by the Prefect, passed thro’ Natchez three days ago; And I presume that, before this time, he has placed in the hands of the French...
3 November 1804, New Orleans. “On yesterday I received a letter from the Deputy Collector of which the enclosd No 1 is a Copy, informing of the arrival in the Mississippi of a vessell with a number of Frenchmen onboard, who had captured Said vessell on the high seas under particular circumstances. “I determined that under the Treaty, it would be improper to permit this vessell to find an...
23 September 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose for your perusal a late Letter to me from the Marquis of Casa Calvo, relative to the Insurrection in West Florida, together with a Copy of my Answer thereto. “ The Marquis has considerable Influence among the old Inhabitants of this Province, and being on that account particularly desirous that a good understanding between us should exist, I have...
5 April 1805, New Orleans . “A Late letter from Captain Turner of Natchitoches contains the following Paragraph, ‘I fear the return of the Negroes who had escaped to Nacogdoches will not remedy the evil; the Commandant who restored them has been arrested for so doing, and his Successor has positive orders to carry the Royal Decree concerning fugitive Slaves into effect; my informant is a...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 4 December 1805, New Orleans. “I have had no late intelligence from Mr. Graham; it is probable he has met with some detention at Pensacola, for it is (I presume) well known to you, that dispatch in business is not a trait in the spanish character. “I am sorry to inform you that much confusion exists in the County of Atachapas; the Citizens in that quarter are...
8 January 1802, Natchez. Reports that “nothing very interesting” has occurred since his letter of 20 Dec. Territorial legislature transacts business slowly, but with care and prudence. “Political disquietude is nearly exiled,” and the judiciary is the sole subject of popular discontent. Regrets that territorial Supreme Court is “so deficient in Law Knowledge.” The chief justice “was...
2 March 1804, New Orleans. “The northern mail arrived on last evening, but brought me no official letters from the Seat of Government. “Perfect tranquility continues to prevail here; but really the burdens of the temporary Government are at present peculiarly hard upon me; and are becoming more so every day. “I am compelled to exercise more authority than I had contemplated. I fear my Decrees...
8 December 1803, Fort Adams. “I am still at this place. An embarkation is talked of tomorrow; but so many preparatory arrangements yet remain to be performed that I much fear a longer delay. Our militia were mustered this evening and amount to about 200. I wish for myself, no greater force, in addition to the regular troops, and I presume that, in this opinion, the General will accord. The...
Inclosed are the names of the Gentlemen recommended as Councillors to supply the vacancies occasioned by the resignations of J N Destrehan and P. Sauvé. Mr. Mather is an Englishman by Birth; but has acted in this Territory the part of an American. He was a member of the first Legislative Council, and merits, in my opinion a continuance of your confidence. Mr. La Croix is a frenchman by Birth,...
The late removal from the Batture in front of the Suburb St. Mary , of certain Persons, who had taken possession of the same subsequent to the third of March 1807, has been cause of great satisfaction to the Legislative Council & House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans, whose thanks upon the occasion, to the President of the U. States, as expressed in a joint Resolution of the two...
I have lately had but too much occasion to Solicit from your feelings a tribute of condolence for the private misfortunes which have marked my residence in this Country. Once more I have to resume the unfortunate recital by announcing to you the Death of my Brother in Law, and private Secretary, Mr. Micajah G. Lewis, who on Tuesday last, was killed in a Duel near this City. You have no doubt...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 15 March 1806, New Orleans. “The Carrier of the Mail of the United States, from hence to Fort Stoddart, by the way of the Lake, is now in my office, and reports—that, on his arrival at the Town of Mobile, he waited upon Governor Folche, who informed him that the mail would not be permitted to pass by water—upon which the Carrier asked and received permission to...
Mr. James M. Bradford, the Editor of the Orleans Gazette proposing to visit Washington, and having expressed a desire to pay his respects in Person to the President of the United States, I have taken the liberty to introduce him to your Acquaintance; his pursuits have led him to a knowledge of the Territory, and you will find him possessed of much local Information. Mr. Bradford’s political...
10 February 1805, New Orleans . “Colonel De Lassus formerly Lieutenant Governor of Upper Louisiana (with thirty Spanish Soldiers) is now in this City on his way to Pensacola; his Arrival was Announced to me by a Letter from the Marquis of Casa Calvo, of which the enclosure No 1 is a translation, and to which I returned the Answer No 2. The delay attending the evacuation of the Ceded Territory...
27 January 1805, New Orleans. “The Last Northern Mail met with a misfortune. The Rider reported that (about twelve leagues from this City) he was thrown from his Horse in the Night, and when he overtook him the Portmanteau was missing. It was found a few days ago by an Inhabitant floating in the Mississippi near the shore and was immediately forwarded by the Civil Commandant of the District to...
Mr. John Ward Gurley, Attorney General for this Territory was on the 3rd. Instant killed in a Duel by Mr. Jones, the Gentleman who lately married Mrs. Mary Trist;—the dispute was of a private nature; there however is no doubt, but party politicks, promoted this unfortunate affair.—The death of this excellent Citizen is by me most sincerely regreted; I found him faithful to the Government and...
On last evening, I had the honor to receive your much esteemed favor of the 7th. Ultimo, together with its enclosures;—the Letters to the President of the Council, and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Mississippi Territory, have been carefully delivered, and were received with great pleasure by the Gentlemen, to whom they were addressed.— The Resolutions which the Legislature...
13 May 1804, New Orleans. “I received on this morning the enclosed letter from Captain Turner, the Commandant Civil and Military of the District of Nachitoches on the Red River, and immediately returned an Answer of which the paper, marked A, is a copy. “In my letter to you of the 10h. instant, I mentioned that, the Marquis of Casa Calvo, Governor Salcedo, and the Intendant, Moralis, were...
9 April 1804, New Orleans. “The Patroles on last night arrested twelve or fifteen Spanish Soldiers and Sailors who were lurking about the City, probably with a design of deserting and they were on this morning delivered to a Spanish officer. “The greater part of the Spanish forces have this moment taken their departure for Pensacola; they were embarked on board of a Ship, and their numbers...
14 May 1804, New Orleans. “On this morning, I received the enclosed letter from the Commandant of the District of Ouachitas and returned the answer of which the paper marked B is a copy. “You will have discovered, that some time had elapsed after the delivery of Louisiana to the United States, before the posts of Nachitoches and Ouachitas were taken possession of by our troops; This delay...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 4 January 1806, “Near New Orleans.” “Having, for the most part, effected the objects which occasioned my visit to the Atachapas and Apalousas, I am now on my return, and will be at my Post early on Tomorrow. My Private Secretary, who has met me on this Evening, communicated the substance of several important dispatches from you, which were received during my...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 27 September 1805, Concordia . “In consequence of a letter, I received on last Evening from Mr. Graham, of which the enclosed is a Copy, I shall set out on this Morning for New Orleans. “I cannot conjecture the unpleasant Rumors alluded to by Mr. Graham; but I persuade myself they will not prove of serious importance. I am indeed illy fitted for a Journey; my...
30 November 1803 , “ Near Natchez .” Received JM’s communication of 14 Nov. with its enclosures and will pay “faithful attention” to the contents. “I am pleased to find that provision has been made to relieve me from the labours and responsibility of the Revenue Department at New Orleans, and I learn with satisfaction that the President has selected for the Collector Mr. H. B Trist; A...
27 March 1803 , “ Near Natchez .” Acknowledges receipt of JM’s 14 Feb. letter with its enclosure on the evening of 24 Mar. Forwarded the New Orleans packet to Hũlings by express on 25 Mar. “It is reported that several french Officers have arrived at Orleans and Certain information received of the sailing of the fleet with the army for Louisiana.” He will learn if the report is true when the...
Your friendly Letter of the 10th of July reached New-Orleans, during my late absence from that City, and was not received by me, until my return from Nachitoches. This circumstance will I hope, plead my apology for the delay of my answer. Your Letter to Mr. Reibelt has been delivered; that gentleman (with his family) is now in this City—I have not yet seen his Lady, but she is spoken of as a...
A late arrest of a Spanish officer in this City by the Civil authority, has occasioned much agitation here, and excited in a great degree, the displeasure of the Marquis of Casa Calvo, and of Governor Folch. I have not time by this Mail, to furnish the Secretary of State with the particulars of this affair, but I pray you to be assured, that the conduct of the constituted authorities has been...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 5 December 1805, New Orleans. “Mr. Graham has this moment returned from Pensacola, and brought me Governor Folch’s reply to my communication of the 31. of October last. “The answer is not as explicit as I could have wished; but it is probable that the difficulties to which our commerce is at present subjected at Mobile may soon be removed. I will inclose you a...
  On yesterday the House of Representatives recommended, as Councillors, Dominique Bouligny, and Julian Poidrass.—Mr. Bouligny is a young man of Sense, and supports an amiable character;—but in my opinion, Mr. Poidrass is the most deserving man in this Territory;—he was President of the late legislative Council, and acquitted himself with great credit;—he has been a uniform friend to the...
The enclosures No. 1 & 2 are Letters I lately received from Governor Folch, and that No. 3 a Copy of the Answer I have returned. Governor Folch in these Communications has discovered an irritability of temper, which the occasion did not call for, nor could I avoid taking exception to the Stile in which he thought proper to address me. The Embargo , always disagreeable to our neighbours of...