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I arrived here this evening and had the pleasure to meet General Wilkinson. I find that the boats &c, are not yet ready for embarkation, but the General supposes he will be able to make a movement on the 6th instant. On my route hither, I met the express mail from New Orleans, and received by that conveyance a communication from Mr Clark of which the enclosed is a copy. I congratulate you,...
The General is apparently making every possible preparation to embark immediately, but I fear we shall not be able to proceed tomorrow as was expected. The boats are not yet all covered, but will probably be completed this evening. I feel a great anxiety to be at New Orleans. But I find it is no easy task to put even a small army into motion. I am happy at the pleasing prospect now before us...
The transports as fast as they are completed receive their lading: and there is a prospect of a final embarkation tomorrow evening. I am daily learning the serious expence of military preparations; and shall therfore pray to my god, more fervently than ever, that our country may never be forced to the ruinous necessity of extensive armaments. In preparing transports, equipping soldiery and...
7 December 1803, Fort Adams. “Yesterday evening and until about noon this day we had so heavy a fall of rain as greatly to retard our embarkation. The General however expects that we shall be able to proceed in the course of tomorrow. “I understand that there is a small corps of rifle men on their way hither from Jefferson County. But I should Suppose that the volunteers already here together...
It is with singular Satisfaction, we announce to you the peaceful Transfer of the Province of Louisiana by the Commissioners of Spain to the Commissary of the French Republic, communicated to us by that officer in a Letter, received last Evening (bearing Date the 30. ulto) a Copy of which we transmit you, under Cover, together with his Proclamation, issued on the Occasion, to which we have...
8 December 1803, Fort Adams. “I am still at this place. An embarkation is talked of tomorrow; but so many preparatory arrangements yet remain to be performed that I much fear a longer delay. Our militia were mustered this evening and amount to about 200. I wish for myself, no greater force, in addition to the regular troops, and I presume that, in this opinion, the General will accord. The...
I arrived here this evening about 24 hours after the Troops had disembarked. They had favorable weather, and a short passage from Fort Adams. My detention was occasioned by an accident on the River; The Schooner in which I sailed ran aground at Point Coupee; and I had to proceed hither, with the other Gentlemen on board, in a small Boat much crowded and exposed to the weather. I have however...
The letter from the American Commissioners will inform you that we are now in possession of this City; and I hasten to inform you of the measures which I have taken as Governor of Louisiana. A proclamation of which the enclosed is a copy was issued by me immediately after the surrender of the province. You will observe that it is silent concirning the Militia (a subject deeply interesting to...
20 December 1803, New Orleans. “We have the satisfaction to announce to you, that the province of Louisiana was this day surrendered to the United States by the Commissioner of France; and to add that the flag of our Country was raised in this City amidst the acclamations of the inhabitants. “The enclosed is a copy of an instrument of writing which was signed and exchanged by the Commissioners...
Since my last I have been as busily engaged as circumstances would admit, in making such arrangements for the temporary government of this province as I esteemed most consonant to the intentions of the President, and the expectations of the inhabitants. The difficulties I meet with in this undertaking are peculiarly embarrassing on account of the neglected state in which I found the colony....
Our Letter of the 20th Inst. informed you of the Delivery of Louisiana to the United States, and we now inclose an original Copy of the Process Verbal , or minutes of the transaction, which was signed on the occasion by the Commissioners of France and of the United States. The Barracks Magazines Hospital, and public Store Houses in this City, yet remain in the occupancy of the Spanish...
The tranquillity in which I found this province is uninterrupted: and every appearance promises a continuation of it. This is the season of festivity here; and I am pleased to find that the Change of government gives additional spirit to the public amusements. It gives me great satisfaction to learn from every side the favorable inclinations of the people; and their confidence in the justice...
Since our Letter of the 27. ulto but little Progress has been made in the Business of the Commission. Orders have been issued, by Mr Laussat for the Delivery of the Posts of Concord, Atakapas & Opelousas , to such American Officers as have been selected for those stations, and we are waiting like Orders for the Surrender of the Post of Natchitoches on Red River and those in upper Louisiana....
The Orders from the French Commissioner, for the Delivery of the Posts at Natchitoches and those in upper Louisiana, of which we have been in Expectation for some Days, are not yet received. The Delay has arisen from the Tardiness of the Spanish Commissioners. We are informed however by Mr Laussat, that he has, at Length, received from the Marquis de Casa Calvo, the necessary Instructions to...
I have the honor to enclose you a copy of the ordinance for establishing a court of Justice in this City, which was alluded to in my last communication. I have only to repeat that this measure was essential to the interests of the City, and was called for by the voice of the society, and I persuade myself that the proceedings of this Tribunal will be marked with justice and moderation. I also...
Since my last letter, I have organized in this City four Companies of volunteer militia; they are armed with public muskets, and appear to possess an ardent military spirit, and a sincere attachment to the United States. On yesterday I received an address from the free people of colour , the original of which I now enclose for your perusal. To this address I made a verbal response: they were...
No alteration has taken place since our last, of which you have a duplicate under cover, excepting the receipt of the necessary orders, for the delivery of all the Spanish Posts in upper Louisiana, and at Nachitoches and it’s dependencies. But we have to apprize you of an unexpected occurrence of a most unpleasant nature. Early yesterday morning we were formally advised by Mr. Daniel Clarke,...
The French vessel which I mentioned to you in my last letter, has been brought to at Plaquemines, but not having yet received an official report from the officer, I am unable to give you a particular account of the passengers. The period allowed by the Treaty for the withdrawing of the French and Spanish forces from the ceded Territory expires on this day, and still little or no preparation is...
A vessel arrived at this port a few days since with fifty African negroes for sale. Being unwilling to permit so barbarous a traffic, if my powers authorized me to prevent it, I immediately applied to a Mr. Leonard the late Spanish Contádore at this place, a man of great integrity of character for information as to the laws and customs of Spain relating to the African trade, and received from...
On yesterday we had nearly witnessed in this city a serious riot. A guard of Spanish soldiers, being on duty at the house of the Marquis De Casa Calvo, (who was himself absent) and very much intoxicated, made an attack upon a sailor who was passing the street. The citizens interfered and beat off the guard. One citizen was slightly wounded and a Spanish soldier very much beatten. Early...
New Orleans is, at this time perfectly tranquil, and I hear of no disturbances in any part of the Province. The inhabitants generally manifest great solicitude for a form of government, and the merchants of this City in particular, await with great anxiety some commercial provisions. I believe a decided majority of the inhabitants continue well disposed to the Government of the United States;...
In our Letter of the 16th ultimo, we informed you that we have just then received Information, of the Arrival in the River, of a Vessel with French Troops from St. Domingo. It Appeared by the first Accounts, that a great Mortality had prevailed on Board, and we were Apprehensive of her being infected by some Contagious distemper; It now Appears, that her Company consists of Officers, Surgeons,...
I continue without any advices from the Department of State since my arrival in this city. Two mails from the seat of Government are now due. The failure is attributed to the high waters in the wilderness between Natchez and Nashville. Mr. Grainger has made great improvements in the Post establishment, and greatly accelerated the passage of the mails; but as it is impossible for him to...
You will receive under cover herewith a duplicate of our last of the 7th current, also a copy of a Report made to us by Docr. Watkins Physician of the Port, relative to the Situation of the People on Board the French Transport from St Domingo, and the arrangements to be made for them at Placquemines. On the first of the present Month we received a Letter from the French Commissioner a copy of...
I have the pleasure to inform you that good order continues to prevail in this City, and I believe throughout the Province. The people manifest great anxiety for some fixed Government, but evidence at present great respect for the existing authorities. In my Judicial capacity I receive daily applications; I put off every case that can possibly admit of delay, in full expectation, that in two...
18 February 1804, New Orleans. “Since my letter of this morning, the northern mail has arrived, but brought me no dispatches from the Department of State. “The merchants of this City are very much discontented with their present situation; it was generally expected that the mail would have brought on the revenue act for Louisiana, and in consequence of disappointment, an influential man here,...
20 February 1804, New Orleans. “The citizens of Louisiana passing by water to the United States or to Europe, have requested of me passports or letters of protection. No instructions having been given me on this subject, I have acted with some reluctance; but upon the exercise of my best judgment I thought the request was reasonable, and have given to such applicant an instrument of writing,...
The mail due on last evening from the northward arrived, but brought me no official dispatches. I fear the post has become an uncertain conveyance, and under this impression I shall cause duplicate copies to be taken of all my official communications to you, and will forward them by Mr. Isaac Briggs, who will leave this city for the seat of Government in two or three days. No unpleasant event...
Since our last of the 14 current, of which a Duplicate was forwarded by the last Mail; the French national Brig the Argo has dropped down the River, to Placquemines, for the Purpose, as we understand, of taking on Board the People, who came in the Brig Express from St. Nicholas Mole, and proceeding to France. We hope in Consequence thereof, to be relieved from the accumulating Embarrassments...
Having understood that there were several Parishes or Districts in Louisiana, whose former Commandants had declined acting under the American Government; that the inhabitants were becoming discontented and in some instances that disorders had ensued, I deemed it adviseable immediately to appoint the necessary Civil Officers, and by some verbal communications to endeavor to impress the minds of...
2 March 1804, New Orleans. “The northern mail arrived on last evening, but brought me no official letters from the Seat of Government. “Perfect tranquility continues to prevail here; but really the burdens of the temporary Government are at present peculiarly hard upon me; and are becoming more so every day. “I am compelled to exercise more authority than I had contemplated. I fear my Decrees...
9 March 1804, New Orleans. “The former Spanish Secretary for this Province, Don André [López Armesto] waited upon me this morning, and said that two vessels were now taking in the military Stores of his Catholic Majesty and that between the 15th. and 20th. instant the Troops, Arms &c of Spain will all be embarked for Pensacola.” Received a letter “this morning” from Laussat stating “that the...
In a paper which was received by the last mail from the Seat of Government, it was stated that a law had passed the Senate prohibiting the foreign importation of Slaves into this Province. This intelligence has occasioned great agitation in this city and in the adjacent Settlements. The African trade has hitherto been lucrative, and the farmers are desirous of increasing the number of their...
10 March 1804, New Orleans. Has been informed by Daniel Clark that he considers himself no longer authorized to expend the sums appropriated for the relief of seamen in New Orleans. Presumes Clark is correct and asks “that this humane duty be re-committed” to Clark or another person. “There cannot any where exist a greater necessity for a provision of the kind alluded to, than in this port....
Since our last of the 27. ulto. a Duplicate of which goes under Cover, the Spaniards have sent off a small Part of their Troops; and we have received repeated verbal Assurances from several of their Officers that a final Evacuation by them is fixed for the 20 of the present Month; and appearances seem to indicate the Reality of their Intention. We have received two Letters from the...
Two men of the names of Sutton and May were lately convicted in the Mississippi Territory of piracy and felony, and have since been executed. These men were two of Mason’s party; who committed such frequent outrages on the Mississippi river, and on the Wilderness road. This banditti had become a terror to all persons who navigated the Mississippi river or travelled the Wilderness road, and a...
The meeting of which I advised you in my letter of the 10th inst. has taken place. The assembly was more numerous than I had expected, and was composed principally of respectable merchants of New-Orleans, and farmers in its vicinity; but few Americans were present. The meeting was held at the house of a private gentleman, and conducted with some decorum. Through the polite attention of a...
16 March 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a copy of three Ordinances which I have lately passed; one of which contains a Charter for a Bank. “The establishment of a Bank in this city was much wished for by the inhabitants and I believe will prove of great utility: but I must confess I should not have ventured upon the measure from these considerations alone.” Learned of efforts to make the...
24 March 1804, New Orleans. “I have received your letter of the 20th ultimo and which is the only communication from you that has reached me since my arrival here, and even this was not permitted to pass without being perused by some abandoned person, for the seal was broken when it was handed me. It will indeed be a difficult task, to discover where the abuses in the Post department are...
24 March 1804, New Orleans. “The contents of your private letter gave me great pleasure; the permanent residence of Moralis in Louisiana, I should greatly regret.… “The Marquis De Casa Calvo is the enemy of Moralis, and a hint from me to the Marquis, that Moralis’s removal from Louisiana, would be agreeable, will (I believe) effect the object. “Moralis is a sensible, intrigueing, designing,...
25 March 1804, New Orleans. “In a conversation some days ago, with Major Stephen Minor,” was told “that some men in the Mississippi Territory who had heretofore been most clamorous against the Land Speculation, had now become conspicuous Speculators, and that an officer of the Government , had, (to his own knowledge) been guilty of what he conceived a fraudulent transaction.” Asked Minor to...
30 March 1804, New Orleans. “Since our last of the 11 instant, a Duplicate of which is under cover we have received the Remainder of the public Records of the Province. The Delivery of the Store-Houses and Magazines & the Evacuation of the City by the Spanish Troops are the only important unfinished Objects relating to our Commission.” Enclose a 27 Mar. 1804 letter from Laussat showing “that...
31 March 1804, New Orleans. “The laws regulating the commerce of Louisiana, have been received here and that which relates to the registering of vessels has given great satisfaction. We have also seen the law providing for a temporary Government in the shape it passed the Senate; the prohibiting the importation of Slaves is a source of great dissatisfaction.” Believes the people will express...
3 April 1804, New Orleans. “In consequence of a Deposition forwarded to me by a Mr. Bailey, of which the enclosed No. 1 is a copy, I addressed on the 28th Ultimo to the Marquis De Casa Calvo a letter of which the enclosed No. 2 is a copy, when the answer of the Marquis is received you shall be advised thereof.” Letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosures ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive...
7 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have received an answer to the letter which I addressed to the Marquis De Casa Calvo on the 28th. ultimo; a translation of the answer and of the documents accompanying it are preparing, and when completed, the originals shall be transmitted to you. It seems La Coquette was fitted out at this place, and was permitted to depart after the receipt of assurances from...
8 April 1804, New Orleans. “Enclosed is a copy of an inflamatory production which was posted up at the Markethouse in this City, in the course of last night. “At 8 O’clock this morning I heard of this writing, and immediately caused it to be taken down. The Author is not known, but the general suspicion attaches to some of the late emigrants. “I find that this inflamatory address, is greatly...
9 April 1804, New Orleans. “The Patroles on last night arrested twelve or fifteen Spanish Soldiers and Sailors who were lurking about the City, probably with a design of deserting and they were on this morning delivered to a Spanish officer. “The greater part of the Spanish forces have this moment taken their departure for Pensacola; they were embarked on board of a Ship, and their numbers...
10 April 1804, New Orleans. “Tranquility continues to reign in this city and its vicinity. M. Laussat takes his leave of the Spanish Commissioners on this day; and the day after tomorrow he proposes to pay his last visit to the American Commissioners. His departure therefore it is expected will take place in a few days. The Barracks evacuated by the Spanish troops have been put in our...
10 April 1804, New Orleans. “Last Sunday I made a visit to the Convent in this City and was received by the Nuns with every mark of respect. “To an affectionate and complimentary Address, which was presented me, I returned an answer a Copy of which is enclosed. “I am much pleased with this institution; the Nuns have uniformly supported the most amiable character and the education of female...
11 April 1804, New Orleans. “The inflam’atory address (enclosed you in my letter of the 8th. instant) is very generally censured, and I have been requested by a number of respectable citizens to offer a reward for the discovery of this incendiary and (when discovered) to punish him with severity. Lest however, a consequence might be attached to this unimportant affair both here and in the...