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In a Letter from M r Mather Mayor of N w Orleans , under date of the 23 rd of July , he speaks of the request I had made of him, to inform me of the Authority under which the Spanish Governors removed the Intruders from the Batture , and he says— “I have taken the advised steps to procure the information desired; but shall not be able to get answers from Mesrs Blanque and Moreau Lislet before...
Permit me the honor of introducing to your acquaintance, Mr. Joshua Lewis—one of the Land Commissioners for the district of Orleans. It is reported, that, since the arrival of Morales at the Town of Mobile, the navigation of the Mobile river, by American Vessels, has been objected to:—The report, however, wants confirmation. It is also rumoured, that the Spaniards at Nacogdoches, having taken...
I have received your favours of the 10th. and 14th. of March, and am indeed happy to find that the ungenerous calumnies to which I have been subjected, have not made on your mind impressions unfavorable towards me.—I am aware that abuse , much abuse is the constant attendant on Office, under our Government; I have endeavored to meet it with compossure—But when I perceived a political conduct...
Edward Livingston sailed two days since in a vessel bound to Philadelphia , & from whence he proceeds to the City of Washington.—His object is (as reported) to have a personal conference with you upon several subjects private & political;—Among the former, the case of the Batture will be introduced;—among the latter, the acts of General Wilkinson during the winter of 1806, & of the Territorial...
I am now on my excursion to the Several Counties, and hope to accomplish my Journey in a short time;—Unless indeed I should be arrested by Indisposition which is not improbable, for the Summer’s Heat is oppressive, and dangerous to travelers.— Mr. Graham after a series of misfortune put into the Havanna’, & from whence he sailed for the United States on the 15th. Ultimo—I hope Mr. Graham will...
My Administration here, from the time of my Arrival in Louisiana, to the close of the late provisional Government, has already became an object of some discussion: to this I can have no objection; I wou’d rather court it, were I assur’d, that the Enquiries wou’d be conducted with Candour.—but some publications have appear’d here upon the subject, in which, I do not think Justice has been...
My friend mr. Ribelt who returns to the United States under an apprehension that he has met with some heavy domestic misfortune, can give you much interesting information as to the state of things in this quarter. The Troops ordered to this Territory,— with the aid of the Militia,—are—in my opinion, amply sufficient to repel any force which our Spanish Neighbours could, at present,...
Before my departure from this Post, I cannot deny myself the pleasure of addressing to you a private and inofficial Letter.— Information of the Mission to New-Orleans , with which you honored me, I received on the evening of the 17’th Ultimo, and the measures which I have taken since that period, have been faithfully detailed to you by my Communications to the Department of State.—The...
A certain Muntford Perryman has been convicted before the District Court for the District of Orleans, of passing conterfeit Notes of the Bank of the United States, knowing them to be counterfeit, and was thereupon sentenced to imprisonment for three years. Under an impression that the said Perryman is a fit object of mercy, we cannot refrain from soliciting in his behalf, your Pardon. The...
I now inclose you a copy of the correspondence which prece’ded the meeting between Mr. Clark & myself, & I sincerely hope you may find therein some apology for my conduct. I feel, as if I had been rashly imprudent;—But there are some considerations, which altho’ they do not justify me, yet (in my own opinion) they go far in extenuation.— From my earliest entry into public Life, I have been in...
My feelings have led me to an act which I fear may subject me to your censure. I was engaged on the 8th. instant in a Duel with Mr. Daniel Clark. The affair took place within the Florida line, and at the first fire, I received a ball which passed through my right thigh about ten inches below the hip, and made a considerable contusion in my left. Fortunately the bone was not injured, and altho’...
My letters to the Secretaries of State and War have acquainted you with the state of things in this quarter.— The case of the Batture continues a source of uneasiness to the Louisianians, and unless Mr. Livingston is arrested in his operations, the Port of New Orleans may sustain injury.—This subject was lately before a Grand Jury, and their opinion conveyed in a Presentment, of which the...
Since my letter of the 5th. Instant advising you of the death of my esteemed friend J. W. Gurley, Mr. Robertson has consented to act as Attorney General, but with an intention of holding it no longer, that a suitable Character can be selected to fill the office permanently.— If the appointment of Register of the Land office, which is now vacant, should be confered on Mr. Robertson, I am...
  I have the honor to introduce to your acquaintance, Major Fortier, an Inhabitant of this City, and a very useful and worthy member of our Society.   Major Fortier has acted as one of my Aid de Camps from the period of my first arrival in this City, to the present day—and I have found in him the character of an active officer, a good american, and an honest amiable young man. With sentiments...
On this day at 7 O’clock, I sat out from Mr. Fortiers, and arrived at noon, at the house of Mr. Truards, the Judge of the County Court, for the County of German Coast. Judge Truard had invited to his house, the Justices of the Peace, and the other Civil officers of the County, & with whom I had the honor to dine.—The day passed pleasantly away, and I was pleased to find, that the American...
I have forwarded you by the Ship Fame bound to Baltimore, a small Box containing a few Fossils &c. collected by a Mr. “Richard King on his excursion to the Hot Springs, on the Ouachita River,” and of which I solicit your Acceptance.— Mr. King in his Letter to me, speaking of the Hot Springs—observes—“These Springs form the most extraordinary Phenomenon in the World. The Water is hot almost to...
Since the 12th. Ultimo Messrs. Poidrass Morgan and Watkins have been attending in the City with a view of meeting in Council in conformity to my Proclamation. Messrs. Kenner and Wikoff (who from fear of the Fever had avoided the City) appeared a few days since. These five gentlemen are all who of the original Thirteen named as Councillors thought proper to accept. The situation of things here...
Since my last letter to you, I have greatly recovered my health, and I have the pleasure to add, that Mrs. Claiborne is now pronounced by her Physicians to be out of danger.—The fever continues to prevail here; but within a few days it has assumed a milder shape, and in several instances has yielded to medicine. The mortality during the last month was principally confined to Strangers;—but on...
Mr. Clark has arrived, and every exertion is making to induce him, to take a violent part against the late proceedings here; A splendid Dinner has been given him, at which Edward Livingston presided as President, assisted by Mr Phil: Jones, and Mr. Ross a dismissed Sheriff.—Among the Guests were, the Judges of the Superior Court, and James Workman late Judge of the County of Orleans; The...
I am honored with the receipt of your interesting letter of the 27. of April. The arrangement of our Militia, which was recommended to Congress, was well calculated for the defence of our Country, and it is regretted by me that the system was not approved. The proposition which was submitted to Congress, with a view to the immediate settlement of a part of this Territory by American Citizens ,...
Captain Cammack of the Marine Corps being order’ed to the City of Washington, I cannot avoid testifying to you my entire approbation of his Conduct while on this Station, and recommending him to your notice as an officer of merit and Talents;—He has for some time commanded the Marines at New-Orleans, & while his own Department has been uniformly correct, the most exact discipline has been...
Immediately on the Receipt of your favour of the Instant (which was handed me two days since), I addressed a Letter to the Mayor of New-Orleans , requesting him to Consult M r Moreau Lislet , as to the powers of the former Governors of Louisiana to remove persons who might intrude on the Batture ;— We know that an authority of the kind, was exercised by the
I persuade myself that my letters of the 12th and 24th of August, have reached you in safety. I have not yet been enabled to procure Romane’s map of Louisiana, and I fear the Geographical sketches which were promised me, by a Gentleman residing at Nachitoches on the Red River will not be forwarded. This Gentleman is a Doctor Sibly, formerly of North Carolina, and a man of good general...
At the request of Mr. Julian Poidrass and of Mr. Pierre Derminon, Judge of the Parish of Point Coupie, I have the honor to transmit you the enclosed Address , signed by a number of the respectable Inhabitants (Planters) of Point Coupie, and which I am persuaded conveys a sincere expression of their sentiments on the subject to which it relates. With sentiments of great respect I have the honor...
At the particular request of Peter Pedisclaux, a Recorder of Mortgages, and a Notary public in this city I take the liberty to forward to you, the enclosed petition and the documents accompanying it. On my arrival in this city, I found the offices of Mr. Pedisclaux shut, and himself invested with no appointment under the administration of M. Laussat the Colonial Prefect. Mr. Pedisclaux was an...
A few days since, I visited the settlement of Terre-au-Boeuf, so called from a Creek or Bayou on which it is situated, and where formerly the Buffalos ranged.– This Bayou lies to the East of the Mississippi, and is about 22 miles in length; It makes from Lake Born, & communicates with the Mississippi about fifteen miles below New-Orleans; The Bayou is at present nearly dry, but when the River...
I have the honor to enclose you, an address from the House of Representatives of the Mississippi Territory, and the pleasure to add, that the Sentiments it contains, are in unison with the feelings of a great majority of the Citizens of this Territory.— I am persuaded, an opinion generally prevails in this District, that the Liberty, Peace, & safety of our Country, greatly depend upon the...
I have the pleasure to announce the arrival of Judge Hall; he reached this City three days ago; and on this Morning, I delivered him his Commission, and administered the oaths of Office. The death of Colonel Kirbey is really an event I greatly lament; But I persuade myself his vacancy will soon be filled by an able and judicious Judge.—Mr. Prevost is attentive to his duties, and his decisions...
A list of the Gentlemen recommended to compose the Legislative Council Benjamin Morgan Dr. John Watkins Dr. Robert Dow William Kenner William Donaldson James Pitot Francis Duplessis & Peter Petit of New-Orleans. James Mather Colonel Bellechasse & Le Breton D’Orgenoy—residing on the Coast between the City and Manshac. Dr. John Sibley of Nachitoches. William Wykoff & Theophilus Collins of...
The Office of Surveyor for this Port, having become vacant by the Death of Mr. Andrew Porter, I take the liberty to recommend to you as his Successor Mr. Peter L. B. Duplessis. This Gentleman is a Native Citizen of the United States, and Speaks the French Language in great purity. He was formerly in the employ of my Deceased friend H. B. Trist, who often Spoke of him to me in the most...
After a passage of 46 days from Nashville; I reached this Town, on the Morning of the 23rd. Instant;—during the Voyge, I experienced no misfortune; and Mrs. Claiborne ; myself; and family enjoyed good health. The Affairs of this District, are greatly confused; in a Word, Anarchy is (nearly) the order of the day:—The restoration of Good Order; and regular Government will be an arduous Work; and...
I have recently experienced the heaviest of Afflictions.—It has pleased Allmighty God to call to the abode of Rest my whole family.—On the evening of the 25th. Instant my only child, a sweet little Daughter under three years of Age, breathed her last, and in the morning ensuing Mrs. Claiborne closed a Life , with the continuance of which my happiness was intimately connected.—Every medical...
Since my letter of the 14 th Instant , it has been deemed expedient to proceed against m r Livingston before the Parish court of New Orleans , by way of information , and of which a copy is herewith enclosed. M r
There is not in this Territory, all that political Union, which I could wish; But I verily believe that the Discontents are not extensive, nor do I think them of a serious nature.—The Memorial no doubt, was signed by many Citizens; But I nevertheless do not view that Instrument as a fair expression of the public will.—Twenty persons composed the first meeting; three or four Sketches of a...
By the last Mail I had time only to acknowledge the receipt of your agreeable favour of the 26th of May; but I now propose replying to it more particularly. There can indeed be no question of Doctor Sibley’s good sense and information, nor do I doubt his zeal for the Public Interest. Of the Private Character of the Doctor, I had no personal knowledge, but it having been attacked here with some...
I have this moment understood that Messrs. Girod and Chal , Merchants of this City, have addressed a letter to you, complaining “that I had (to their injury & exclusion) recognized in the Baron of Bastrop, an exclusive right to trade with Citizens at Ouacheta and also with the Indians who might visit that post, which privilege had been heretofore granted to the Baron by the King of Spain”;—The...
I have forwarded a Commission as Councillor to Doctor John Sibley; he is certainly a Man of Information, & is capable of making a good Member of the Legislature. I must confess that I felt trust on seeing the Paragraph concerning the Doctor, which I enclosed you by the last Mail—My personal Acquaintance with him is limited, but as an interesting Correspondent I had respected him, & formed an...
By Mr. Dean who goes to the City of Washington with public dispatches, I do myself the pleasure to transmit you a Map of a part of this Territory.— It is the most correct of any I have seen, and as such is offered for your acceptance. Mr. Deplantier is now in this City, and proposes, without delay, to locate a portion of the lands granted to General La Fayette.— We hope to be enabled to...
I beg you to receive—accompanied with my warm respects—a Treatise written on the Criminal Laws of this Territory. I have the honor to be Your sincere friend— Major Rd. Claiborne takes this opportunity of sending his old and continued affection to Mr. Jefferson. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Mr. Roebelt, who has been appointed United States Factor for the Post of Nachetoches, is now in this City. He is awaiting at this place, his instructions, and seems at this time to be uninformed as to the duties which are expected of him. In his Commission he is named the Factor for the Post of Nachetoches, and it would seem therefrom that his agency would be confined solely to the management...
My official Communications of yesterday to the Secretary of State, will acquaint you of the unpleasant aspect of Affairs in this quarter.— I persuade myself, that the danger from within will not prove as serious as is apprehended;—But whatever difficulties may arise, you may rely with Confidence, on my best exertions for the defence of my Country and Government. General Wilkinson is of...
 I had the Honor a few days since, to receive your Letter of the 10th of July, and its contents shall engage my early attention. By the ensuing Mail therefore, I shall forward you a list of the Buildings (the property of the United States) in this City, together with my opinion as “to the best distribution to be made of them”.—  I learn thro the Medium of the News papers, that a Peace...
In a Letter which I addressed to the Mayor of New-Orleans , under date of the 7 h Instant , I requested him “to ascertain the sums of money expended by the Corporation, since the 20 h of December 1803 , and to transmit an account of the same to you.” I have supposed, that this information might prove useful in the Trial of Livingston’s Suit, and therefore I wish it to be laid before your...
Having been informed that Doctor John Watkins had declined the appointment of Surgeon to the Garrison of New Orleans, permit me to name to you Doctor Oliver H. Spencer as qualified in the opinion of those who know him to fill that Station. Doctor Spencer is a young man of promising talents: his skill, industry and attention in the practise of medecine and his amiable deportment in private life...
The late Indian Agency which has been confered on Doctor John Sibly has occasioned an investigation of his private character, and I discover that it has received many injurious reproaches. Mr. Bradford the Editor of the Orleans Gazette has addressed to me a Letter upon the Subject, which I deem it a duty to lay before you, more especially since in some of my former Letters to you, I spoke...
I have been honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 24th. of May, and the Communication enclosed therein, I shall, with great pleasure, lay before the House of Representatives of this Territory, at their next meeting.—A free and innocent passage along the Waters running into the Bay of Mexico, will contribute greatly to the convenience and Interest of many of your fellow Citizens, and...
I have the honor to enclose you a Copy of the Answer of the Marquis of Casa Calvo to my Letter of the 11th. Instant, and to Subscribe myself— With great respect, Yo: faithful friend DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
A few days previous to my departure from Fort Adams, I had the honor to address to you a private letter , which I hope has reached you in safety. Since my arrival in this City, my official communications to the Department of State have informed you of all events of importance, and thro’ that channel I shall endeavour to keep you fully advised of such political occurrences as are worthy of...
At the particular request of the Superior of the Convent in this city, I have the honor to enclose you a communication from the Ursaline Nuns. These respectable Ladies merit and possess a great share of the public esteem; their conduct is exemplary, and their time is usefully employed in the education of female youth.—During my short residence in this city, I have paid the Nuns very great...
Governor Falch is yet in this City, arranging (as is understood) with the Marquis a plan for improving and strengthening the Garrison at Pensacola. These Gentlemen (I hear) are impressed with an opinion that the U. States will abandon their Claim to West Florida, and that East & West Florida will be given in exchange for the West Bank of the Missisippi;—But this I presume is in conformity to...