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Mr. Graham, who visits the United States by your permission, will be enabled to satisfy your enquiries with respect to this Territory—and particularly as it relates to our local politics. On the return of Mr. Graham, which I hope will be in September next, I intreat your permission (unless the state of things here should render my presence necessary) to visit the United States. I should be...
Since my last Letter, I have filled the Blank in the Marshalls commission, with the Name of Francis Joseph Le’Breton Dorgonoy, and administered to him the Oaths of office.—This Gentleman is a Native of Louisiana; an independent Farmer, and possessing (as is stated to me) inflexible Integrity. Mr. Dorgonoy is also an American in sentiment and feeling; he has of late given umbrage to some...
I have filled up the blank Commissions, which you committed to my Care, with the Name of John Thibaut of New-Orleans, & I now enclose the Bond he has given, and the Oaths he has taken & subscribed , in manner as the Law directs.— Mr. John Thibaut is a Native Frenchman, and was highly recommended to me as a Man of Integrity and Information; He resided four years in the U. States, & for the last...
Mr. Isaac Briggs and Mr. Robert Williams are now in this City, and propose taking their passage (by Water) for the Seat of Government in two or three Days. I cannot omit so favorable an opportunity to write you an unofficial and private Letter.—The causes which induce these Gentlemen to leave Natchez, they will themselves explain. I do sincerely regret the excuse for their departure, but under...
I am sorry that I have remained thus long from my Post; But it really was not in my power sooner to have left Tennessee;—On tomorrow however, I shall certainly take my departure for the Missisippi Territory:—The Western Waters are uncommonly low, and I anticipate a long Voyage, but the season of the year, is favorable, and if the health of myself, and family should be preserved, my passage...
In consequence of my late visit to Opelousas, your Letters of the 9th. and 17th. July, did not reach me, until my return to this City which was on the evening of the 25th. Ultimo;—This circumstance, will I hope, plead my apology, for the delay, of my answer.— Your ideas, relative to the projected Canal between the Mississippi, and the Bayou St. John, have been privately and inofficially...
My official letters of this date to the Secretaries of State and War will acquaint you with the state of things in this quarter. The general Assembly of this Territory is now in Session.—I anticipate some difficulty with these young Legislators; but I trust we shall harmonize, and that the result of our deliberations will not be unacceptable to the People. I have informed the House of...
A Mr. Lafon is now engaged in surveying the Land on the Canal of Carondolet;—He supposes that about eight or nine Hundred acres may be had, nearly half of which he says is excellent Land, and not subject to be overflowed. Mr. Briggs has been very unwell, and could not in person attend the surveying— I am Dear Sir with great Respect Your faithful friend DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Mr. Briggs and Mr. Williams of whose arrival in this City, I informed you in my last , have been detained longer than they had calculated on; they will however, sail on tomorrow in a Vessel bound for Philadelphia, but the Captain has promised to land them at Charleston if the wind should admit of it. I think it probable that these gentlemen will reach the seat of Government early in April....
The Articles sent you by Captain Lewis, left this City some Days ago; and were put on board the Ship Comet; they were addressed to the Care of the Collector at Baltimore; and he was requested to forward them by Land to the City of Washington. The Skins were carefully repacked, and the necessary measures taken to preserve them. The little Animal and the Birds were all well, and I sincerely hope...
Your letter dated on the 16th. of August at Monticello, has been duly received. My official communications to the Secretary’s of State & War, will have informed you of the trial and conviction of four Alabama Indians charged with murder. The Court, the Attorney General & myself entertaining doubts how far the act of Congress, which points out the mode of trying Indians for offences committed...
Since my letter of the 3d. instant, I am completely disappointed in my contemplated visit to the United States; I had made all the arrangements for my departure, and even taken my passage—when the unexpected summons for Mr. Graham, as a witness in Burr’s trial, rendered my continuance in the Territory indispensible. I regret the disappointment the more on account of the ill health of Mrs....
About 20 minutes since, I received a Letter from my friend Docter Sibley, enclosing me a Map of the Country West of the Mississippi, which I hasten to forward to you:—The Doctor’s Letter contains much useful Information, & therefore I have taken the liberty to transmit it for your perusal & must beg you to receive it in confidence.— The Northern Mail is now closing, and the Post-Master allows...
At the request of Colo: Liblong late an Officer in the Spanish service, and one of the most respectable and Antient Inhabitants of this City, I have the honor to enclose for your acceptance, a Tragedy in manuscript, of which the Colonel is himself the Author.—I do not know, that this production as relates to the stile & manner, possesses any peculiar merit; But when we bear in mind, that the...
I am now in the County of Acadia and my Indisposition having assumed a more serious aspect, I shall avail myself of the hospitality of Mr. Barranger, and continue with him, until my fever (which is still slight) shall have left me. Mr. Barrangers farm is in a high state of cultivation, & his Improvements greatly surpass those of any other Citizen; his house is commodious; built of brick, and...
Your friendly Letter of the 13th. of last Month, I had the honor to receive, on the 1st. Instant, accompanied with a Letter from the Secretary of State, enclosing me a Commission, as Governor of the Mississippi Territory.—I acknowledge with Gratitude, my Obligations to you, for this high proof of Confidence and Esteem, and, I trust, that every Act of my public Life, will evince my great...
I arrived at this place two Days since, & had intended to pass in this vicinity a Week or 10 Days;—But finding from the Northern papers the hostile aspect of our Affairs with Great Britain, and supposing it possible , that my presence in New-Orleans may be necessary, I shall, without delay, repair to my post. The late Act of British Aggression has excited in this Territory the same feeling...
My friend Doctor Lattimore , having it in contemplation to pass thro’ Albermarle, on his way to the Seat of Government, I have taken the liberty to introduce him to your Acquaintance;—You will find the Doctor a well informed, modest man—his political principles are purely republican, and his firmness may be relied upon.— I will refer you to Doctor Lattimore for the State of Affairs in this...
In conformity to the request of the Legislative Council & House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans , I have the honor to transmit you certain Resolutions , expressive of their high sence of “your long, faithful & important public services,” & of their grateful recollection of your interference in the case of the Bature , the preservation of which as a Public Common, is considered...
My official Letters to the Secretary of State, have advised you, of Mr. Livingston’s exertions to promote a Memorial to Congress, the object of which is to obtain the immediate recognition of Louisiana as a Member State of the Union. Mr. Livingston is supported by Messrs. Evan Jones and Daniel Clark, and there is no doubt but they will be joined by many french Inhabitants.—I have not seen the...
It is with real concern I announce to you, the death of my esteemed friend H. B. Trist. He died this morning of a malignant yellow fever, after an illness of five days. The loss of this Citizen is a public misfortune, and will occasion much private distress:—He was faithful to the trust with which you honored him, and had he lived a few years longer, would have made ample provision for the...
I have the Honour to enclose you a copy of my address to the Legislative Council, and of the answer returned thereto. The meeting of the Council has had already a happy effect; the few Intriguers who have laboured to stop the wheels of Government are greatly discouraged, and the well disposed Citizens highly satisfied. The only anxiety I now feel is, that the means I resorted to, to form a...
In my last Letter , I anticipated the resignation of Mr. Seth Lewis , the Chief Justice of this Territory;—I was yesterday informed by that Gentleman , that his resignation had actually been forwarded. If Judge Jackson of Tennessee (the Gentleman I named to you in my last Letter) should not be offer’ed the Appointment of a Judge for this Territory, or be unwilling to accept, permit me Sir, to...
I left New Orleans on the 20th Ultimo, and reached this place on Yesterday;—on my Journey I was taken extreemly ill;—for seven days my Fevers were incessant and my Death was esteemed a probable event. But it has pleased God to prolong my life, and I now feel as if my Health would soon be restored.—I left New Orleans with a view of visiting the several Counties, and assisting personally in...
I am honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 16. of January; and its enclosure has been delivered to the Speaker of the House of Representatives. I have also received from the department of State, Commissions for four members of the Council; the fifth member is not yet notified to me—but I trust his Commission will arrive previous to the meeting of the Legislature, which will be on the...
After a most disagreeable passage of near three days from the Mississippi, I arrived on yesterday morning at the County Town of Attackapas, much fatigued, very wet (for I was exposed for more than two hours to a heavy rain) and extremely unwell. I am now however at a most charming Situation, and in comfortable quarters; where I have the benefit of a pure Country air, and the most agreeable Sea...
By an Act of the late Congress, the District of Palmira, in this State, being discontinued, and all the Waters, Shores and Inlets lying within Tennessee, being annexed (from and after the 30th day of June next) to the District of Massac ’ on the Ohio , it has become an Object of much Importance, to the Merchants & Traders of this State, that a deserving and judicious Citizen should be...
In compliance with the Request contained in your Letter of the 10th of July, I now have the Honor to enclose you a Statement of the Buildings in this City, “which devolved on the United States,” together with my opinion “of the best distribution to be made of them.—The Government House I presume ought as heretofore to be appropriated for the accommodation of the Executive, and that convenient...
When a Secretary for this Territory shall have been named, and entered on the duties of his office, I trust my temporary absence may be permitted;—I could wish to proceed direct to the U. States; but if Mrs. Claiborne’s present State of health, should continue, it would be my desire, to call either at Pensacola, or the Havannah.— If a Citizen of this Territory, should be appointed Secretary, I...
The State of things in New Orleans continue in uncertainty. The Prefect is yet in that City; but not in the exercise of authority. A Vessel from Philadelphia, laden with military Stores, and destined for Fort Adams is now in the Mississippi;—It is said, the Prefect requested the Spanish Government not to permit this Vessel to pass New-Orleans, & was answered, that the free navigation of the...
I have the pleasure to inform you, that the Laws of this Territory, is are enforced in every part of the Territory directed to be occupied by the Presidents Proclamation of the 27 th of October , except a small District around the Town & Fort of Mobile ;—There a Spanish Force is stationed, and must remain undisturbed, until the further Orders of my Government. I hope however these orders, will...
I am this Moment honerd with your Letter of the 26th. of May, and will reply particularly to it, by the Post next ensuing. The Mail arrived in a disordered State; many of the Letters were wet, (as was the packet directed to me) but I do not learn, that any were lost. Your Letter to Doctor Sibley, I shall forward to Nachitoches on Tomorrow.—The little animal mentioned in my Letter of the 6th is...
Of late there has been a defference between the Mayor of this City, and the officer commanding the Troops: The correspondence which ensued, I now have the Honor to enclose You, in conformity to the particular request of the Mayor , who is desirous that his conduct on the occasion should be known to you.— My official Letters to the Secretary of State, will acquaint you with the state of things...
Since my last letter, I have made with Colonel Freeman an arrangement concerning the regular Guards, which I trust will put an end to those complaints heretofore exhibited by the Citizens. The troops stationed here, have I believe conducted themselves as well as an army ever did similarly situated; but it is impossible for any Commander to maintain Discipline among men posted in a City , where...
During my late Illness, I had the pleasure to receive your esteemed favours of the 7th., 12th and 17th. of July;—But being then unable to write, I requested my private Secretary Mr. Briggs to inform you of their receipt, and to forward to you, the Names of several Gentlemen as suitable Characters for the Legislative Council.—I regret exceedingly the miscarriage of your Letter to me of the...
Mr. Daniel Clark is elected the Delegate to Congress,—the sincere friend to his Country, Doctor Watkins, was supported by the native Citizens of the United States who are in the Legislature,—the votes of the ancient Louisianians were divided between Daniel Clark and Evan Jones. I do not know the course the Delegate may pursue,—he possesses talents, and may if he pleases, be servic’able to the...
I have the honor to enclose you attested Copies of a Petition to Congress from sundry Inhabitants of Orleans , and also of certain Resolutions entered into by the Legislative Council & House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans upon the subject of the Batture . These Documents support all the facts on which you relied, in directing possession to be taken of the Batture by the Marshal...
On yesterday in this City, there was great rejoicing—The Citizens generally evinced a grateful recollection of the period which annexed Louisiana to the United States, & thro’out the Day there was a degree of harmony which afforded me singular pleasure. —The paper enclosed will give you some account of the particulars.—You may be assured Sir, that the great body of this people, are becoming...
Permit me the honor to introduce to your acquaintance, M r Poidrass , the Delegate from Orleans to the Congress of the United States . M r Poidrass possesses a great share of the esteem and confidence of his fellow Citizens, and has uniformly used his influence in support of the measures of the General Government. As relates to this Territory, there is no one more interested in its welfare...
By the last Mail, I could only acknowledge the receipt of your esteemed favour of the 30th. August;—But I shall now do myself the pleasure to reply to it more particularly. On receiving the Appointment of Governor of this Territory, I feel sensibly the honor confered, and shall be the more solicitous to deserve a Continuance of your Confidence;—I am however firmly persuaded that the office...
The Mail has this moment arrived, and brought me your Letter of the 28th. of October.— The Communication you made to Mr. Gelston fell into proper hands, and has been used as you intended.—As the Mail will leave this early in the morning, I shall defer replying particularly to your Letter until next week.— Accept Dear Sir assurances of my respectful attachment DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have heard with great regret, that you should have been disturbed in your Retirement, by that restless and I fear most unprincipled man Edward Livingston . The Affair of the Batture , has assumed a Shape I had not anticipated; But whatever View of it may be taken, I feel assured (if the principles of immutable Justice should prevail) that the pretensions of Mr Livingston will be found...
On last evening, I received your Letter of the 3rd of April , enclosing your Answer to an Address, from the House of Representatives of this Territory, and which , I shall, with great pleasure, forward to the Speaker of that Body.— With assurances of my highest respect;—I have the honor to subscribe myself—Your faithful friend, and most obt. Hble. Servant RC ( DLC ); in a clerk’s hand, signed...
On the 5th. Instant I left the City and passed up on the East side of the Mississippi.—It is only Six months, since I last visited this vicinity, and I discover evidences (within that period) of considerable improvement. Several new Buildings are complited; others repaired, and the fields extended, and laid out with more regularity and taste.— My first day’s travel was only 8 miles to—the...
Your Letter of the 29th of October has been received, and its enclosure delivered to the Gentleman to whom it was directed.—Mr Reibelt is certainly a very learned Man, and as far as I know a very honest one;—But he is illy calculated to fill an office under a Republican Government, nor indeed do I know any situation in which he could be so useful to Society, as in Character of an Instructer of...
I have received your Letter of the 2nd. Ultimo, together with its several enclosures.— Your Letter to Mr. Brown was immediately delivered;—that to Colonel Kirbey is returned to you, & whose death I presume you have by this time been informed of.— Mr. Brown has mentioned to me his Intention to decline serving either as Judge or Secretary; the Salary is not sufficient to support him comfortably,...
I have been honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 25th. Ultimo , together with a Report of a Committee of Congress, which accompanyed it . So far as may depend upon my Agency, no exertions shall be wanting to carry into effect in this Territory, the Militia System adopted by the National Legislature, “and in a manner the best calculated to insure such a degree of military discipline...
Your letter of the 12th. Ultimo (covering copies of the orders of the Secretary’s of War & of the Navy relative to the deserters which had been forcibly taken from the District of Baton Rouge) has been received; & in reply to a late letter from Governor Grand Pré, in which he expressed a Solicitude, to learn the orders of the President, relative to that transaction , I did on the 11th....
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 24 January 1806, New Orleans. “I have the honor to enclose you a Copy of a statement made me on Oath, by Stephen a free black man; I do not credit it in whole; I however, have no doubt, but that the free people of Color have been tampered with, and that some of them are devoted to the spanish Interest. “Mr. Morales is yet in this City, and should I not an [ sic...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 5 July 1805, New Orleans. “In a former Letter, I advised you of the departure of Captain Carmick for Pensacola with a communication from me to Governor Folch upon the Subject of the Post Road through West Florida. Captain Carmick was detained much longer than was expected, and has returned without Governor Folch’s Answer. A Copy of Captain Carmicks Letter to me...