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I have been honored with the receipt of your letter of the 21. of March, inclosing a copy of an act of Congress which authorizes the President to accept of such Company or Companies of Volunteers, not exceeding 30,000, as shall make a tender of service. The present state of things on the western side of the Mississippi, as far as I am advised, authorizes a hope that no difficulty will shortly...
When a Secretary for this Territory shall have been named, and entered on the duties of his office, I trust my temporary absence may be permitted;—I could wish to proceed direct to the U. States; but if Mrs. Claiborne’s present State of health, should continue, it would be my desire, to call either at Pensacola, or the Havannah.— If a Citizen of this Territory, should be appointed Secretary, I...
Since my letter of the 3d. instant, I am completely disappointed in my contemplated visit to the United States; I had made all the arrangements for my departure, and even taken my passage—when the unexpected summons for Mr. Graham, as a witness in Burr’s trial, rendered my continuance in the Territory indispensible. I regret the disappointment the more on account of the ill health of Mrs....
I now do myself the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Letter of the 3rd. of February last. Mr. Reibelt was illy fitted for the Management of Indians, & he might himself to be pleased with the Change. I have recently appointed Mr. Reibelt Parish Judge for the Parish of Avoyelle in this Territory; An Office which is respectable, & which will give him six or seven hundred Dollars per...
I have the honor to inclose you, a copy of Some Resolutions which have been adopted by the Legislative Council and House of Representatives of this Territory, in consequence of my message of the 10th. Instant. You will perceive by these documents, that the power of suspending the privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus, is supposed not be vested in the Territorial Legislature; an opinion which...
 The Bearer Mr. Hopkins was charged with public Despatches (of great importance) to the Secretary of State, and I trust will have safely delivered them, when he presents you with this Letter.—  Mr. Hopkins is desirous of obtaining a Commission in the Army of the U. States; He is a young Man of amiable disposition, correct habits, and good Judgment—I can venture, therefore to recommend him to...
My official Communications of yesterday to the Secretary of State, will acquaint you of the unpleasant aspect of Affairs in this quarter.— I persuade myself, that the danger from within will not prove as serious as is apprehended;—But whatever difficulties may arise, you may rely with Confidence, on my best exertions for the defence of my Country and Government. General Wilkinson is of...
Your friendly Letter of the 10th of July reached New-Orleans, during my late absence from that City, and was not received by me, until my return from Nachitoches. This circumstance will I hope, plead my apology for the delay of my answer. Your Letter to Mr. Reibelt has been delivered; that gentleman (with his family) is now in this City—I have not yet seen his Lady, but she is spoken of as a...
My official Letter of this date, to the Secretary at War, will inform you of the state of things in this quarter,—the reasons which occasioned my visit to this Post, and the part I have acted since my arrival. In addressing you therefore at this time, I have only to announce an event, which unpleasant as it may be, is nevertheless proper to acquaint you of.—Lieutenant Lewis of the Army, who I...
After a most disagreeable passage of near three days from the Mississippi, I arrived on yesterday morning at the County Town of Attackapas, much fatigued, very wet (for I was exposed for more than two hours to a heavy rain) and extremely unwell. I am now however at a most charming Situation, and in comfortable quarters; where I have the benefit of a pure Country air, and the most agreeable Sea...
I am now relieved from fever, but am so enfebled that I cannot complete the Journey, which I had contemplated;—Instead of visiting the Country on the Mississippi, as high as Natchez which was originally my intention, I shall pass over to Atakapas & Opelousas, where I shall breathe a healthy air, & where probably my health will soon be restored. The Route by water to Attakapas will be...
I am now in the County of Acadia and my Indisposition having assumed a more serious aspect, I shall avail myself of the hospitality of Mr. Barranger, and continue with him, until my fever (which is still slight) shall have left me. Mr. Barrangers farm is in a high state of cultivation, & his Improvements greatly surpass those of any other Citizen; his house is commodious; built of brick, and...
On this day at 7 O’clock, I sat out from Mr. Fortiers, and arrived at noon, at the house of Mr. Truards, the Judge of the County Court, for the County of German Coast. Judge Truard had invited to his house, the Justices of the Peace, and the other Civil officers of the County, & with whom I had the honor to dine.—The day passed pleasantly away, and I was pleased to find, that the American...
On the 5th. Instant I left the City and passed up on the East side of the Mississippi.—It is only Six months, since I last visited this vicinity, and I discover evidences (within that period) of considerable improvement. Several new Buildings are complited; others repaired, and the fields extended, and laid out with more regularity and taste.— My first day’s travel was only 8 miles to—the...
I am now on my excursion to the Several Counties, and hope to accomplish my Journey in a short time;—Unless indeed I should be arrested by Indisposition which is not improbable, for the Summer’s Heat is oppressive, and dangerous to travelers.— Mr. Graham after a series of misfortune put into the Havanna’, & from whence he sailed for the United States on the 15th. Ultimo—I hope Mr. Graham will...
A few days since, I visited the settlement of Terre-au-Boeuf, so called from a Creek or Bayou on which it is situated, and where formerly the Buffalos ranged.– This Bayou lies to the East of the Mississippi, and is about 22 miles in length; It makes from Lake Born, & communicates with the Mississippi about fifteen miles below New-Orleans; The Bayou is at present nearly dry, but when the River...
A certain Muntford Perryman has been convicted before the District Court for the District of Orleans, of passing conterfeit Notes of the Bank of the United States, knowing them to be counterfeit, and was thereupon sentenced to imprisonment for three years. Under an impression that the said Perryman is a fit object of mercy, we cannot refrain from soliciting in his behalf, your Pardon. The...
I am honored with the receipt of your interesting letter of the 27. of April. The arrangement of our Militia, which was recommended to Congress, was well calculated for the defence of our Country, and it is regretted by me that the system was not approved. The proposition which was submitted to Congress, with a view to the immediate settlement of a part of this Territory by American Citizens ,...
My friend mr. Ribelt who returns to the United States under an apprehension that he has met with some heavy domestic misfortune, can give you much interesting information as to the state of things in this quarter. The Troops ordered to this Territory,— with the aid of the Militia,—are—in my opinion, amply sufficient to repel any force which our Spanish Neighbours could, at present,...
The legislature having adjourned, I feel my mind relieved from much of that anxiety I lately experienced. I nevertheless am abundantly occupied in my office, and am for the present confined to the City. So soon however as I shall cause the laws passed by the legislature to be printed and distributed, it is my intention to visit the several Counties on and adjacent to the Mississippi, with a...
Inclosed are the names of the Gentlemen recommended as Councillors to supply the vacancies occasioned by the resignations of J N Destrehan and P. Sauvé. Mr. Mather is an Englishman by Birth; but has acted in this Territory the part of an American. He was a member of the first Legislative Council, and merits, in my opinion a continuance of your confidence. Mr. La Croix is a frenchman by Birth,...
Mr. Roebelt, who has been appointed United States Factor for the Post of Nachetoches, is now in this City. He is awaiting at this place, his instructions, and seems at this time to be uninformed as to the duties which are expected of him. In his Commission he is named the Factor for the Post of Nachetoches, and it would seem therefrom that his agency would be confined solely to the management...
Major William Nott of Louisiana a native Citizen of the United States and President of the New Orleans Insurance Company, having understood that the Office of Consul for the United States at the Port of Bordeaux, in France would soon become vacant, has solicited me to name him to you as a Candidate for the honor of that appointment. I feel no hesitation in representing Major Nott as meriting...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 28 May 1806, New Orleans. “On yesterday the House of Representatives rejected the resolution of the Council mentioned in my letter of the 26th.; and on this day the two Houses are dispatching business with dispatch and concord. “The Resolution of the Council was passed without reflection, and was evidently the result of passion. As far as I can learn the public...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 28 May 1806, New Orleans. “I pray you to lay before the President of the United States, the inclosed letters from Messrs. Destréhan and Sauvé, resigning their Seats in the Legislative Council; together with copies of my answers thereto. Colonel Bellechasse had also written his letter of resignation—but has since been induced not to forward it. “The services of...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 26 May 1806, New Orleans. “I this day rejected the Bill, of which a copy was inclosed to you in my letter of the 22. instant. This act of mine has given rise to a proceeding no less unexpected than it is unprecedented and exceptionable. The Council have passed a resolution proposing an immediate dissolution of the assembly; assigning for reason—that the Governor...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 22 May 1806, New Orleans. “I inclose for your perusal a copy of another Act of the legislature which I shall reject. This measure was probably suggested by some of the French lawyers, and has become a favorite measure with the majority in the two houses, its rejection therefore will perhaps excite some discontent; but the course my judgment suggests, must be...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 21 May 1806, New Orleans. “I have yielded to the wishes of Governor Grand Pré, and have permitted Passports to be given to such of the Citizens of the United States as may travel through the settlement of Baton Rouge, and who may apply for Passports at my Office. These Passports are without Seal, and signed by my Private Secretary. This is done in order to save...
Mr. Daniel Clark is elected the Delegate to Congress,—the sincere friend to his Country, Doctor Watkins, was supported by the native Citizens of the United States who are in the Legislature,—the votes of the ancient Louisianians were divided between Daniel Clark and Evan Jones. I do not know the course the Delegate may pursue,—he possesses talents, and may if he pleases, be servic’able to the...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 20 May 1806, New Orleans. “Mr. John F. Merriult, a Merchant of this City proposes to visit Madrid with a view of obtaining payment of a debt due him by the Government of Spain. “The claim of Mr. Merriult is considerable; and under an impression that the interference of the American Minister would be favorable to his interest, he proposes to ask of you a letter...
Mr. Graham, who visits the United States by your permission, will be enabled to satisfy your enquiries with respect to this Territory—and particularly as it relates to our local politics. On the return of Mr. Graham, which I hope will be in September next, I intreat your permission (unless the state of things here should render my presence necessary) to visit the United States. I should be...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 16 May 1806, New Orleans. “Mr. Graham, who visits the United States by permission of the President, will be enabled to satisfy your enquiries with respect to the state of things in this Territory. Mr. Graham departs with my regret; his attachment to the interest of his country, and his private virtues secured him my friendship, while his good sense and prudent...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 14 May 1806, New Orleans. “The Secretary of the Territory, Mr. Graham, will depart from hence to the United States in a few days; by him I shall write you fully as to the state of things in this quarter. “The Territorial Legislature will I fear do little good during the present session; they are devided, and one party, the strongest, seems to me to be greatly...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 8 May 1806, New Orleans. “I enclose for your perusal, a copy of a Bill which had passed the two houses of the Legislature; together with a Copy of a message, notifying my disapprobation thereto. “This subject has occasioned much conversation in this place, and is made by some, a ground of complaint against me. As this affair may probably be misrepresented at the...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 29 April 1806, New Orleans. “I am sorry to perceive the divisions which exist in Congress, and particularly among men whose political sentiments were formerly in union, but I have no doubt ⟨but?⟩ that virtuous men and virtuous measures will meet with the support of the Nation. “The personal observations with respect to myself which Mr. Randolph thought proper to...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 16 April 1806, New Orleans. “It is here very generally understood, that the King of Spain has permitted a Settlement on the River Trinity, and established a free Port on the Bay of St: Bernard. The Royal Decree upon this subject is said to be dated in September 1805, and to have been published by the Vice-Roy of Mexico in February last. It is represented to me...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 16 April 1806, New Orleans. “Late accounts from Nachitoches state, that the Spanish Force has been withdrawn from the Sabine, and that the orders given to cross that river and establish a Post near Nachetoches, were countermanded by the Governor General of Taxus; It is probable therefore that, for the present, every thing will remain tranquil on our Frontier....
I cannot hear, without much anxiety, of the great events which are passing in Europe. The whole Continent seems to have acknowledged the superiority of France, and it is probable that England will ultimately submit to the Will of Bounaparte. When Armies are destroyed in a day, and Nations rise and fall in a month,—you will I trust excuse me in expressing my solicitude to hear of the present...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 8 April 1806, New Orleans. “The inclosed correspondence between Governor Grand Pré and myself deserves your perusal. I am inclined to think there is no foundation for the information communicated by Governor Grand Pré, and I rather suppose it is resorted to as a pretext for his late measures. “I have no recent intelligence from Nachitoches; At the date of my...
  I have the honor to introduce to your acquaintance, Major Fortier, an Inhabitant of this City, and a very useful and worthy member of our Society.   Major Fortier has acted as one of my Aid de Camps from the period of my first arrival in this City, to the present day—and I have found in him the character of an active officer, a good american, and an honest amiable young man. With sentiments...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 3 April 1806, New Orleans. “As the situation of this Country is somewhat peculiar, perhaps the subject of the inclosed letters deserves the Consideration of our Government. I am myself at a loss to know why Mr. Deforgues has not put the business upon the footting I proposed to him, or made to me some other proposition than the one contained in his letter. His...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 3 April 1806, New Orleans. “I now enclose you copies of the answers which have been returned by the Council and House of representatives to the Communication which I had the honor to make them on the 25. ultimo. “You will perceive with pleasure the patriotic sentiments of the legislature, and which to me are the more satisfactory because I am persuaded of their...
  On yesterday the House of Representatives recommended, as Councillors, Dominique Bouligny, and Julian Poidrass.—Mr. Bouligny is a young man of Sense, and supports an amiable character;—but in my opinion, Mr. Poidrass is the most deserving man in this Territory;—he was President of the late legislative Council, and acquitted himself with great credit;—he has been a uniform friend to the...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 29 March 1806, New Orleans. “The news from Nachetoches is of an unpleasant nature. Spanish troops to the number of four hundred, accompanied by some Indians, are assembled on the Sabine, and threaten to advance and to maintain the same position (near to Nachetoches) from which a Small spanish Guard was lately driven by Captain Turner under the orders of Major...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 27 March 1806, New Orleans. “On the 24. instant, the House of Assembly formed a Quorum; and on the following day I delivered to them an Address, of which the inclosed is a Copy. “I am anxious to learn the real state of affairs between the United States, and foreign nations—and particularly so, as it relates to Spain. The free navigation of the Mobile, by...
My official letters of this date to the Secretaries of State and War will acquaint you with the state of things in this quarter. The general Assembly of this Territory is now in Session.—I anticipate some difficulty with these young Legislators; but I trust we shall harmonize, and that the result of our deliberations will not be unacceptable to the People. I have informed the House of...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 25 March 1806. “I fear the Garrison of Fort Stoddart will experience serious Inconveniences for the want of supplies; Judge Toulmin, who has just arrived from the Tombigby, informs me, that at the period of his Departure, there was at Fort Stoddard, 25 Barrels of flour, 8 Barrles of Beef, & a small quantity of Spirits; he adds that when this is gone, the Troops...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 18 March 1806, New Orleans. “The enclosed papers will acquaint you with the detention of the Schooner Ann at the Town of Mobile, and of the objection, by the Spanish Agents to the passage of said Vessel to Fort St. Stephen. “I have, heretofore, written to Governor Folch relative to the obstructions offered to our Commerce on the Mobile—and I deem further...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 18 March 1806, New Orleans. “I enclose you a copy of a letter which I yesterday received from the Governor General of Cuba, from which it would seem that the Spanish Government did not expect, speedily, to adjust, with the United States, the Limits of Louisiana.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 59, TP , Orleans, vol. 8). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by...
By Mr. Dean who goes to the City of Washington with public dispatches, I do myself the pleasure to transmit you a Map of a part of this Territory.— It is the most correct of any I have seen, and as such is offered for your acceptance. Mr. Deplantier is now in this City, and proposes, without delay, to locate a portion of the lands granted to General La Fayette.— We hope to be enabled to...