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I have been honored with the receipt of your Letter of the 24th. of May, and the Communication enclosed therein, I shall, with great pleasure, lay before the House of Representatives of this Territory, at their next meeting.—A free and innocent passage along the Waters running into the Bay of Mexico, will contribute greatly to the convenience and Interest of many of your fellow Citizens, and...
The Road leading from this Territory thro’ the Chickasaw & chactaw country to Tennessee has become Very insecure. Robberies are frequent, one Citizen has recently been killed, and two others wounded. The robberies are supposed to have been committed by a party of abandoned white-men who alternately infest the Mississippi River & the road; the other Depredations may be attributed to a few...
I have only time by this days mail, to acknowledge the Receipt of your agreeable favors of the 17th and 18th of July, and to add, that I will with all possible dispatch, give you all the Information I can acquire, in relation to the Province of Louisiana. I pray you Sir, to receive my sincere congratulations on the success of Mr. Monroe’s mission;—The Island of Orleans and the extensive...
My friend Doctor Lattimore , having it in contemplation to pass thro’ Albermarle, on his way to the Seat of Government, I have taken the liberty to introduce him to your Acquaintance;—You will find the Doctor a well informed, modest man—his political principles are purely republican, and his firmness may be relied upon.— I will refer you to Doctor Lattimore for the State of Affairs in this...
My Letter of the 12th Instant, acknowledged the receipt of your agreeable favours of the 17th & 18th of July;—Since which I have turned my attention, to the several subjects embraced in Queries relative to Louisiana, and I now lay before you, the result of my inquiries and reflections— 1st. What are the best Maps general or particular of the whole or parts of the Province? Copies of them if to...
7 September 1803 , “ Near Natchez .” Has reason to believe “that much of the vacant Land in Louisiana, will be covered by fraudulent grants” before the U.S. takes possession. Don Joseph Vidal, commander of the Spanish post across the river from Natchez, “manifests great solicitude” that his friends in the Mississippi Territory “should possess themselves of Lands in his vicinity .” Has learned...
I persuade myself that my letters of the 12th and 24th of August, have reached you in safety. I have not yet been enabled to procure Romane’s map of Louisiana, and I fear the Geographical sketches which were promised me, by a Gentleman residing at Nachitoches on the Red River will not be forwarded. This Gentleman is a Doctor Sibly, formerly of North Carolina, and a man of good general...
30 September 1803 , “ Near Natchez .” Advised JM in his letter of 7 Sept. that citizens of the Mississippi Territory were surveying lands west of the Mississippi River “with a view … to obtain fraudulent Titles” from Spain. Encloses a copy of his letter to Clark on this subject and Clark’s answer. “It seems that Captain Vidal has no authority to grant Lands or even to authorise a Location, but...
In my letter of the 7th: Instant, I advised you, that many of the Citizens of this Territory, were surveying Lands West of the Mississippi, with a view, as I apprehended, to obtain fraudulent Titles for the same from the Spanish Government. I now enclose you a copy of a Letter, which I addressed to Mr. Clark on this subject, as also of his answer. It seems that Captain Vidal has no authority...
About 20 minutes since, I received a Letter from my friend Docter Sibley, enclosing me a Map of the Country West of the Mississippi, which I hasten to forward to you:—The Doctor’s Letter contains much useful Information, & therefore I have taken the liberty to transmit it for your perusal & must beg you to receive it in confidence.— The Northern Mail is now closing, and the Post-Master allows...
On last evening, I received by the express Mail, your Letter of the 31st. Ultimo, together with its several enclosures. The Appointments with which I have been honored by the President demand from me, the warmest expressions of Gratitude. Impressed as I am with the importance of our newly acquired Territories to the Glory and permanent Interest of my Country, I cannot express to you, the...
18 November 1803, Natchez. “Shortly after closing my despatches of this morning I received the enclosed letter from Mr Clarke to which I returned an answer, a copy of which is likewise enclosed.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 59, TP , Orleans, vol. 2); letterbook copy ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive Journal, vol. 13). RC 1 p.; printed in Rowland, Claiborne Letter Books Dunbar Rowland, ed.,...
Captain Turner, the commanding officer at Fort Adams has just arrived. He tells me that by letters from General Wilkinson dated at Pensacola on the 27th of last month, he learns that in three days the General was to set out from that place by the way of New Orleans for Fort Adams, and would probably arrive there on to morrow. Captain Turner adds that all the troops at Fort Adams in sufficient...
26 November 1803, Natchez. “I have certain information that on the 11th Instant General Wilkinson left Fort St Stephens for Mobile from whence by the way of the Lakes he would proceed to New Orleans and thence to Fort Adams, where his arrival may be soon expected. To my dispatches to the Prefect and Mr. Clark (copies of which I transmitted to you by the last Mail) I have not yet received...
The special messenger whom I despatched to New Orleans on the 18th instant, returned this evening, and brought with him the enclosed communications from Mr Clark and M. Laussat. The French officer, M. Landais, whose arrival at New Orleans was so much wished for by the Prefect, passed thro’ Natchez three days ago; And I presume that, before this time, he has placed in the hands of the French...
30 November 1803 , “ Near Natchez .” Received JM’s communication of 14 Nov. with its enclosures and will pay “faithful attention” to the contents. “I am pleased to find that provision has been made to relieve me from the labours and responsibility of the Revenue Department at New Orleans, and I learn with satisfaction that the President has selected for the Collector Mr. H. B Trist; A...
1 December 1803, Natchez. “This day having proved fair, I embarked, a Company of the Natchez Artillery, another of Riflemen, and one Company of Militia Infantry, in all about one hundred Men, on Board of a Vessel at the Natchez Landing, with orders to Sail immediately for Fort Adams.” Impressed a schooner into public service; this schooner will assist in transporting troops and stores to New...
2 December 1803, Natchez. “The Mail this evening brought me a Letter from Mr. Clark, which I here inclose with sincere pleasure, as it contains additional grounds of expectation, that the Province of Louisiana &c will be delivered over to us without the necessity of our having recourse to Hostile extremities. As there is I believe no doubt but that Mr. Landais brought with him the original...
I arrived here this evening and had the pleasure to meet General Wilkinson. I find that the boats &c, are not yet ready for embarkation, but the General supposes he will be able to make a movement on the 6th instant. On my route hither, I met the express mail from New Orleans, and received by that conveyance a communication from Mr Clark of which the enclosed is a copy. I congratulate you,...
The General is apparently making every possible preparation to embark immediately, but I fear we shall not be able to proceed tomorrow as was expected. The boats are not yet all covered, but will probably be completed this evening. I feel a great anxiety to be at New Orleans. But I find it is no easy task to put even a small army into motion. I am happy at the pleasing prospect now before us...
The transports as fast as they are completed receive their lading: and there is a prospect of a final embarkation tomorrow evening. I am daily learning the serious expence of military preparations; and shall therfore pray to my god, more fervently than ever, that our country may never be forced to the ruinous necessity of extensive armaments. In preparing transports, equipping soldiery and...
7 December 1803, Fort Adams. “Yesterday evening and until about noon this day we had so heavy a fall of rain as greatly to retard our embarkation. The General however expects that we shall be able to proceed in the course of tomorrow. “I understand that there is a small corps of rifle men on their way hither from Jefferson County. But I should Suppose that the volunteers already here together...
It is with singular Satisfaction, we announce to you the peaceful Transfer of the Province of Louisiana by the Commissioners of Spain to the Commissary of the French Republic, communicated to us by that officer in a Letter, received last Evening (bearing Date the 30. ulto) a Copy of which we transmit you, under Cover, together with his Proclamation, issued on the Occasion, to which we have...
8 December 1803, Fort Adams. “I am still at this place. An embarkation is talked of tomorrow; but so many preparatory arrangements yet remain to be performed that I much fear a longer delay. Our militia were mustered this evening and amount to about 200. I wish for myself, no greater force, in addition to the regular troops, and I presume that, in this opinion, the General will accord. The...
Before my departure from this Post, I cannot deny myself the pleasure of addressing to you a private and inofficial Letter.— Information of the Mission to New-Orleans , with which you honored me, I received on the evening of the 17’th Ultimo, and the measures which I have taken since that period, have been faithfully detailed to you by my Communications to the Department of State.—The...
I arrived here this evening about 24 hours after the Troops had disembarked. They had favorable weather, and a short passage from Fort Adams. My detention was occasioned by an accident on the River; The Schooner in which I sailed ran aground at Point Coupee; and I had to proceed hither, with the other Gentlemen on board, in a small Boat much crowded and exposed to the weather. I have however...
The letter from the American Commissioners will inform you that we are now in possession of this City; and I hasten to inform you of the measures which I have taken as Governor of Louisiana. A proclamation of which the enclosed is a copy was issued by me immediately after the surrender of the province. You will observe that it is silent concirning the Militia (a subject deeply interesting to...
20 December 1803, New Orleans. “We have the satisfaction to announce to you, that the province of Louisiana was this day surrendered to the United States by the Commissioner of France; and to add that the flag of our Country was raised in this City amidst the acclamations of the inhabitants. “The enclosed is a copy of an instrument of writing which was signed and exchanged by the Commissioners...
Since my last I have been as busily engaged as circumstances would admit, in making such arrangements for the temporary government of this province as I esteemed most consonant to the intentions of the President, and the expectations of the inhabitants. The difficulties I meet with in this undertaking are peculiarly embarrassing on account of the neglected state in which I found the colony....
Our Letter of the 20th Inst. informed you of the Delivery of Louisiana to the United States, and we now inclose an original Copy of the Process Verbal , or minutes of the transaction, which was signed on the occasion by the Commissioners of France and of the United States. The Barracks Magazines Hospital, and public Store Houses in this City, yet remain in the occupancy of the Spanish...
The tranquillity in which I found this province is uninterrupted: and every appearance promises a continuation of it. This is the season of festivity here; and I am pleased to find that the Change of government gives additional spirit to the public amusements. It gives me great satisfaction to learn from every side the favorable inclinations of the people; and their confidence in the justice...
Since our Letter of the 27. ulto but little Progress has been made in the Business of the Commission. Orders have been issued, by Mr Laussat for the Delivery of the Posts of Concord, Atakapas & Opelousas , to such American Officers as have been selected for those stations, and we are waiting like Orders for the Surrender of the Post of Natchitoches on Red River and those in upper Louisiana....
The Orders from the French Commissioner, for the Delivery of the Posts at Natchitoches and those in upper Louisiana, of which we have been in Expectation for some Days, are not yet received. The Delay has arisen from the Tardiness of the Spanish Commissioners. We are informed however by Mr Laussat, that he has, at Length, received from the Marquis de Casa Calvo, the necessary Instructions to...
I have the honor to enclose you a copy of the ordinance for establishing a court of Justice in this City, which was alluded to in my last communication. I have only to repeat that this measure was essential to the interests of the City, and was called for by the voice of the society, and I persuade myself that the proceedings of this Tribunal will be marked with justice and moderation. I also...
A few days previous to my departure from Fort Adams, I had the honor to address to you a private letter , which I hope has reached you in safety. Since my arrival in this City, my official communications to the Department of State have informed you of all events of importance, and thro’ that channel I shall endeavour to keep you fully advised of such political occurrences as are worthy of...
Since my last letter, I have organized in this City four Companies of volunteer militia; they are armed with public muskets, and appear to possess an ardent military spirit, and a sincere attachment to the United States. On yesterday I received an address from the free people of colour , the original of which I now enclose for your perusal. To this address I made a verbal response: they were...
No alteration has taken place since our last, of which you have a duplicate under cover, excepting the receipt of the necessary orders, for the delivery of all the Spanish Posts in upper Louisiana, and at Nachitoches and it’s dependencies. But we have to apprize you of an unexpected occurrence of a most unpleasant nature. Early yesterday morning we were formally advised by Mr. Daniel Clarke,...
The French vessel which I mentioned to you in my last letter, has been brought to at Plaquemines, but not having yet received an official report from the officer, I am unable to give you a particular account of the passengers. The period allowed by the Treaty for the withdrawing of the French and Spanish forces from the ceded Territory expires on this day, and still little or no preparation is...
A vessel arrived at this port a few days since with fifty African negroes for sale. Being unwilling to permit so barbarous a traffic, if my powers authorized me to prevent it, I immediately applied to a Mr. Leonard the late Spanish Contádore at this place, a man of great integrity of character for information as to the laws and customs of Spain relating to the African trade, and received from...
On yesterday we had nearly witnessed in this city a serious riot. A guard of Spanish soldiers, being on duty at the house of the Marquis De Casa Calvo, (who was himself absent) and very much intoxicated, made an attack upon a sailor who was passing the street. The citizens interfered and beat off the guard. One citizen was slightly wounded and a Spanish soldier very much beatten. Early...
New Orleans is, at this time perfectly tranquil, and I hear of no disturbances in any part of the Province. The inhabitants generally manifest great solicitude for a form of government, and the merchants of this City in particular, await with great anxiety some commercial provisions. I believe a decided majority of the inhabitants continue well disposed to the Government of the United States;...
In our Letter of the 16th ultimo, we informed you that we have just then received Information, of the Arrival in the River, of a Vessel with French Troops from St. Domingo. It Appeared by the first Accounts, that a great Mortality had prevailed on Board, and we were Apprehensive of her being infected by some Contagious distemper; It now Appears, that her Company consists of Officers, Surgeons,...
I continue without any advices from the Department of State since my arrival in this city. Two mails from the seat of Government are now due. The failure is attributed to the high waters in the wilderness between Natchez and Nashville. Mr. Grainger has made great improvements in the Post establishment, and greatly accelerated the passage of the mails; but as it is impossible for him to...
You will receive under cover herewith a duplicate of our last of the 7th current, also a copy of a Report made to us by Docr. Watkins Physician of the Port, relative to the Situation of the People on Board the French Transport from St Domingo, and the arrangements to be made for them at Placquemines. On the first of the present Month we received a Letter from the French Commissioner a copy of...
I have the pleasure to inform you that good order continues to prevail in this City, and I believe throughout the Province. The people manifest great anxiety for some fixed Government, but evidence at present great respect for the existing authorities. In my Judicial capacity I receive daily applications; I put off every case that can possibly admit of delay, in full expectation, that in two...
18 February 1804, New Orleans. “Since my letter of this morning, the northern mail has arrived, but brought me no dispatches from the Department of State. “The merchants of this City are very much discontented with their present situation; it was generally expected that the mail would have brought on the revenue act for Louisiana, and in consequence of disappointment, an influential man here,...
20 February 1804, New Orleans. “The citizens of Louisiana passing by water to the United States or to Europe, have requested of me passports or letters of protection. No instructions having been given me on this subject, I have acted with some reluctance; but upon the exercise of my best judgment I thought the request was reasonable, and have given to such applicant an instrument of writing,...
Mr. Isaac Briggs and Mr. Robert Williams are now in this City, and propose taking their passage (by Water) for the Seat of Government in two or three Days. I cannot omit so favorable an opportunity to write you an unofficial and private Letter.—The causes which induce these Gentlemen to leave Natchez, they will themselves explain. I do sincerely regret the excuse for their departure, but under...
The mail due on last evening from the northward arrived, but brought me no official dispatches. I fear the post has become an uncertain conveyance, and under this impression I shall cause duplicate copies to be taken of all my official communications to you, and will forward them by Mr. Isaac Briggs, who will leave this city for the seat of Government in two or three days. No unpleasant event...
Since our last of the 14 current, of which a Duplicate was forwarded by the last Mail; the French national Brig the Argo has dropped down the River, to Placquemines, for the Purpose, as we understand, of taking on Board the People, who came in the Brig Express from St. Nicholas Mole, and proceeding to France. We hope in Consequence thereof, to be relieved from the accumulating Embarrassments...