You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Claiborne, William C. C.

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 5

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Claiborne, William C. C."
Results 151-200 of 536 sorted by date (ascending)
In my official Letter of the third of June, I informed you of a small Assemblage of Citizens in New-Orleans, whose object was to forward an Address to Congress, relative to their local Government. Since that period, Mr. Edward Livingston has been engaged in framing the Memorial, and preparing the Citizens of this place & its vicinity for the reception of the principles which it contains. I...
1 July 1804, New Orleans. “In the forenoon of this day a number of the citizens of this place and some of the farmers in its vicinity assembled for the purpose of considering a memorial to Congress previously drawn by a committee. The memorial is attributed to Mr. Edward Livingston, and is said to be a good piece of composition; the object of it (I learn) is to obtain the immediate...
My official Letters to the Secretary of State, have advised you, of Mr. Livingston’s exertions to promote a Memorial to Congress, the object of which is to obtain the immediate recognition of Louisiana as a Member State of the Union. Mr. Livingston is supported by Messrs. Evan Jones and Daniel Clark, and there is no doubt but they will be joined by many french Inhabitants.—I have not seen the...
3 July 1804, New Orleans. “The Free People of Colour have manifested some dissatisfaction at not receiving an invitation to the meeting of citizens who adopted the memorial to Congress. A piece addressed to the Freemen of Colour and signed by an influential character among them, inviting a meeting in order that they might consult together as to their rights, and the propriety on their part of...
5 July 1804, New Orleans. “The birth-day of our country was passed here, in great harmony and hilarity: High mass was celebrated at the Cathedral church, at 7 in the morning and a prayer offered for the continuance of the happiness and prosperity of the United States. Two appropriate orations the one in the American, the other in the French language were delivered at the Hotel de ville to a...
7 July 1804, New Orleans. “The late slight appearance of discontent among the people of Colour, of which in my last letter I advised you, excited some alarm among the white Citizens , and has determined them to have no more meetings , after the one contemplated on tomorrow, and at that I suppose, but few will attend. “The Louisianians have as little mischief in their dispositions, and as much...
12 July 1804, New Orleans. “The letter which was handed to a printer for publication inviting a meeting of the free people of Colour for the purpose of Memorializing Congress, occasioned an inquietude among the White inhabitants which is just now beginning to subside. The Municipality of New-Orleans expressed a wish that I should punish the Mulatto man who handed the letter to the printer with...
13 July 1804, New Orleans. “The Memorial to Congress, of which I have lately Spoken in several of my official letters, is in circulation, and has obtained many signatures. I have seen one sheet of the original manuscript; it is in the hand writing of Edward Livingston, and the whole was no doubt written by that gentleman, by and with the advice of Daniel Clark and Evan Jones. “The Memorial is...
14 July 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you the last number of the Moniteur , printed in this city. It contains an account of the proceedings of a number of citizens who had assembled for the purpose of praying Congress for redress of their grievances, and also a singular publication from the Marquis of Casa Calvo together with an address signed (it is said) by many of the ancient and...
15 July 1804, New Orleans. “Scarcely a week passes by, but something occurs to create anxiety, and to occasion me trouble. “On yesterday, in commemoration of the destruction of the Bastile a number of Frenchmen assembled to pass the day in joy and festivity. They hoisted the French flag and sung their favourite national songs. The waving of the flag excited the jealousy of the Americans , and...
25 July 1804, New Orleans. “In my letter of the 14th. instant I enclosed you a copy of the Moniteur (No. 422) containing an address from a number of the citizens of Louisiana to the Marquis of Casa Calvo accompanied by certain remarks from the Marquis. “The enclosure No. 1, is a literal translation of the remarks of the Marquis and that No. 2, is a copy of a letter which I this day addressed...
25 July 1804, New Orleans. “On this afternoon, I received by express from Captain Turner a dispatch, of which the enclosures are copies. “Nothing can be more certain, than that the possession of the West bank of the Mississippi by the United States is a source of discontent to the Officers and Satellites of the Spanish Monarchy now in Louisiana, and I learn that the sensibilities of the public...
26 July 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a paper containing a Memorial to Congress, of which I have heretofore advised you. It is generally acknowledged, that Mr. Edward Livingston is the author of this production, and indeed he himself avows it. Mr. Daniel Clark is to carry the memorial to several Districts and to solicit Signatures. He sets out on his mission (I learn) on tomorrow, and...
27 July 1804, New Orleans. “I received on this morning an answer to my letter of the 25th instant to the Marquis of Casa Calvo, and having procured a translation thereof, for my own use, I now enclose you the original Copy . “The answer of the Marquis developes in part the views of his court in relation to Louisiana; every exertion has been and will be made to conciliate and perpetuate the...
30 July 1804, New Orleans. “Your letters of the 19th. & 26th of June , together with their enclosures I have had the honor to receive. “I shall inform Mr. Pedesclaux, and M. De Clouet of the reasons which induced the President of the United States not to interfere in their cases, and shall refer the former to Congress for a further prosecution of his claim, should he still think it...
1 August 1804, New Orleans. “More than two months ago, I received information that a small French privateer, in company with two brigs, the one under French and the other Spanish Colours had entered the Mississippi. “The brigs anchored in the river below Plaquemines , and the privateer with my permission passed that Fort , and came to, about two leagues below this city. Rumour soon pronounced...
4 August 1804, New Orleans. “Since my letter of the 1st. instant, the Captain of the privateer, has shewn me the papers of the prize brig Active, from which it appears, that she was built at St. Johns New Brunswick, and is the property of William Pagan, Robert Pagan and Thomas Pagan Merchants of said place. “The Active was commanded by a Captain Rasor, and when taken by the Privateer was on...
4 August 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you copies of two letters which I this morning received from Captain Turner the Commandant at Nachitoches. “The Caddo Indians spoken of by Captain Turner is a small tribe situated about 80 or 100 leagues from Nachitoches; their warriors are supposed to amount to between three or four hundred; I shall invite the chief of the nation and five or six of his...
9 August 1804, New Orleans. “In the District of Atakapas where party feuds and much general disquietude prevailed on our taking possession of this Province, I have the pleasure to inform you that the most perfect good order now exists, this favorable change is attributed in some degree to the conduct of a very young but I believe a very deserving young officer of the name of Hopkins, who...
10 August 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 10th. Ultimo. “I am glad to understand your sentiments on the case of St. Julien; the more so as they entirely co-incide with my own. His bail I believe to be good, and even independent of that he and his friends seem so confident of his innocence that there appears at present no grounds to apprehend that...
It is with real concern I announce to you, the death of my esteemed friend H. B. Trist. He died this morning of a malignant yellow fever, after an illness of five days. The loss of this Citizen is a public misfortune, and will occasion much private distress:—He was faithful to the trust with which you honored him, and had he lived a few years longer, would have made ample provision for the...
30 August 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to enclose to you, a correspondence relative to the insurrection at Baton Rouge; consisting of a letter from the Marquis of Casa Calvo to myself, with my answer thereto, and letters of advice to the Secretary of the Mississippi Territory, and the Commandant at Point Coupé. “I am happy to inform you from late intelligence that this unpleasant...
30 August 1804, New Orleans. “In the commencement of my late illness I received from the Commandant of Nachitoches the letter No. 1, enclosing the petition of which No. 2 is a translation, and returned the answer No. 3. These papers would have been forwarded to the Department of State at an earlier period had not the rapid advance of my indisposition totally prevented me from attending to any...
During my late Illness, I had the pleasure to receive your esteemed favours of the 7th., 12th and 17th. of July;—But being then unable to write, I requested my private Secretary Mr. Briggs to inform you of their receipt, and to forward to you, the Names of several Gentlemen as suitable Characters for the Legislative Council.—I regret exceedingly the miscarriage of your Letter to me of the...
A list of the Gentlemen recommended to compose the Legislative Council Benjamin Morgan Dr. John Watkins Dr. Robert Dow William Kenner William Donaldson James Pitot Francis Duplessis & Peter Petit of New-Orleans. James Mather Colonel Bellechasse & Le Breton D’Orgenoy—residing on the Coast between the City and Manshac. Dr. John Sibley of Nachitoches. William Wykoff & Theophilus Collins of...
1 September 1804, New Orleans. “I have this moment received from Captain Turner, Commandant at Nachitoches, the enclosed letter from a Mr. Davenport to Doctor Sibley, and hasten to transmit it to you. “This letter appears in some degree to confirm the information heretofore given by Captain Turner, (already forwarded to the Department of State) relative to a decree of the Spanish Government...
Having been informed that Doctor John Watkins had declined the appointment of Surgeon to the Garrison of New Orleans, permit me to name to you Doctor Oliver H. Spencer as qualified in the opinion of those who know him to fill that Station. Doctor Spencer is a young man of promising talents: his skill, industry and attention in the practise of medecine and his amiable deportment in private life...
8 September 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to enclose you a copy of a letter which I addressed to the Marquis of Casa Calvo, upon the subject of the alarm excited at Nachitoches, in consequence of the reports from Nacogdoches , together with a translation of his answer thereto. “I should at an earlier period have addressed the Marquis on this subject, but was prevented by my late...
8 September 1804, New Orleans. “Enclosed is a translation of a letter to me from the Marquis of Casa Calvo, which will shew you the favorable disposition of the Governor-General of Cuba, towards the commerce of the United States, and the desire he feels to prevent Privateers from making sale of their prizes within the limits of his Government. “I have the pleasure to inform you, that the most...
Since my last letter to you, I have greatly recovered my health, and I have the pleasure to add, that Mrs. Claiborne is now pronounced by her Physicians to be out of danger.—The fever continues to prevail here; but within a few days it has assumed a milder shape, and in several instances has yielded to medicine. The mortality during the last month was principally confined to Strangers;—but on...
I have filled up the blank Commissions, which you committed to my Care, with the Name of John Thibaut of New-Orleans, & I now enclose the Bond he has given, and the Oaths he has taken & subscribed , in manner as the Law directs.— Mr. John Thibaut is a Native Frenchman, and was highly recommended to me as a Man of Integrity and Information; He resided four years in the U. States, & for the last...
16 September 1804, New Orleans. “Enclosed is a copy of a circular Letter I have addressed to the several civil commandants in Lower Louisiana. “I am not certain, but the Act of Congress does, on the first of October, virtually withdraw all Judicial Powers from the Authorities now existing in this Province; But in order to prevent those Scenes of anarchy and confusion which might arise in the...
This City continues the Seat of Disease:—On the 16th. Instant died of the prevailing fever my private Secretary Joseph Briggs, on yesterday Mr. John Gelston late of New-York, and on this Morning Mr. Benjamin West late of Philadelphia.— My own family is heavily afflicted; Mrs. Claiborne continues ill, and her Brother (Mr. Lewis) is expected to die in the course of the Day.—The distress of the...
21 September 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a petition addressed to me, and signed by a number of respectable Inhabitants of this City: You will discover, there is some apprehension of an Insurrection among the Negro’s, and that much alarm exists. Altho’ I am not myself of opinion, that we are in as eminent danger as the Memorialists seem to think, I have nevertheless taken every means of...
21 September 1804, New Orleans. “From the great havock which the diseases of this Climate, have recently made among Strangers, and the frequent embezzlement of the property of deceased Persons by unprincipled Men, I have been induced to make special provision for the care of the Estates of certain Intestates. A Copy of my Ordinance in this subject is enclosed, and I hope it will meet the...
23 September 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose for your perusal a late Letter to me from the Marquis of Casa Calvo, relative to the Insurrection in West Florida, together with a Copy of my Answer thereto. “ The Marquis has considerable Influence among the old Inhabitants of this Province, and being on that account particularly desirous that a good understanding between us should exist, I have...
25 September 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a communication, which I have this Day received from the Commandant of the District of Nachitoches. I fear some of the Indian Tribes West of the Missisippi are disposed to be troublesome, and if as is stated, they are encouraged by the Spaniards to war against the U. States, there is no doubt, but the Lives and property of the Citizens on our...
In my Letter of the 25th. I mentioned the Illness of Mrs. Claiborne, and my little Daughter: They have since been called to the Abodes of rest and happiness. My misfortunes have been uncommonly great; to loose in the same Day my whole family was indeed a heavy affliction. But my God willed it, and I must submit with fortitude and Resignation. I have received your Letter of the 30th. Ultimo,...
I have recently experienced the heaviest of Afflictions.—It has pleased Allmighty God to call to the abode of Rest my whole family.—On the evening of the 25th. Instant my only child, a sweet little Daughter under three years of Age, breathed her last, and in the morning ensuing Mrs. Claiborne closed a Life , with the continuance of which my happiness was intimately connected.—Every medical...
1 October 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to introduce to your acquaintance Messrs. Derbigney, Sauve, and Detrahan, and to request that you would be so obliging as to present them to the President. These Gentlemen have been selected by many of their fellow Citizens to bear a Memorial to Congress, which treats upon subjects interesting to Louisiana, and to make such explanations as may be...
1 October 1804, New Orleans. “Mr. Darbigney will deliver to you, a little Box containing a Model of a Cotton Machine, upon a new and improved Plan, and for which Mr. Obadiah Crawford a Citizen of the Mississippi Territory, solicits a Patent as the Inventor. “If Mr. Crawford’s invention should be deemed worthy of the encouragement he asks, I will esteem it a favor, if you would enclose the...
2 October 1804, New Orleans. Acknowledges JM’s 30 Aug. 1804 letter enclosing his commission as governor of Orleans Territory. Asks JM to tell the president how sensible of the honor he is and that he will strive to merit continuance of the president’s confidence. “On this morning the Oaths of Office was administered to me, by Mr. Pitot Mayor of this City, and a Copy of a short Address which I...
3 October 1804, New Orleans. “On Tomorrow Messrs. Derbigney, Sauve and Detrahan (the Agents of a part of the Louisianians) to Congress, take their passage for Washington, via New York, on board the Ship Louisiana. “These Gentlemen go with high expectations of being gratified in all their Wishes—they are encouraged to expect entire success, by the opinions of Mr. Edd. Livingston, who continues...
5 October 1804, New Orleans. “Your Letter dated ‘Virginia August 28th.,’ reached me on the evening of the third instant. “A number of Spanish Officers are yet in Louisiana, and there is no doubt with me, but they encourage the Discontents which arise here. I shall take an early opportunity to intimate to the Marquis of Cassa Calvo, that the continuance of these Officers in our Territory, ‘so...
By the last Mail, I could only acknowledge the receipt of your esteemed favour of the 30th. August;—But I shall now do myself the pleasure to reply to it more particularly. On receiving the Appointment of Governor of this Territory, I feel sensibly the honor confered, and shall be the more solicitous to deserve a Continuance of your Confidence;—I am however firmly persuaded that the office...
8 October 1804, New Orleans. “I have by Letter advised each Member of the Legislative Council of his Appointment, and requested his Acceptance: two answers have been returned; the one from Doctor Watkins; the other from Mr. Jones, & both of which are herein enclosed. Doctor Watkins Accepts, and will make a valuable Member; But Mr. Jones declines, and the Reasons which influence him will, I...
13 October 1804 , “ Near Nw. Orleans .” “Feeling myself very unwell, I have left the City, with a view of passing a few Days in the Country. “I have not learned whether or not the different Councellors will accept; so soon as I receive information on this point, I will forward you the Christian names of the Gentlemen nominated. Mr. Evan Jones has published his Letter of resignation in the...
16 October 1804, New Orleans. “I return’d to this City on this Morning, and find my Health much benefited from my late, tho short, Excursion into the Country. The Sugarcrops are very promising, and the Labour of the planter, will be rewarded abundantly. The Citizens, whom I visited, appear’d to enjoy Health and Contentment, and I was well pleas’d with their friendly Hospitality. I also...
19 October 1804, New Orleans. “On the 19th. instant, a Duel was to have been fought between a French Citizen, and a British Subject, who are temporarily residing in this City: by some means, however, this affair of Honor did not take place, but on the same day, the French-man was can[e]’d by the Englishman in the Streets, and, this Circumstance had very nearly produced on Yesterday, some...
20 October 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a copy of a letter which I addressed to the Marquis of Casa Calvo on the 9th instant, relating to the continuance of certain Spanish Officers in this Territory, as also a translation of his answer. “I am persuaded that these foreigners are not well disposed to the interest of the U. States, and I thought it a duty to express my disapprobation to...