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Having understood that there were several Parishes or Districts in Louisiana, whose former Commandants had declined acting under the American Government; that the inhabitants were becoming discontented and in some instances that disorders had ensued, I deemed it adviseable immediately to appoint the necessary Civil Officers, and by some verbal communications to endeavor to impress the minds of...
2 March 1804, New Orleans. “The northern mail arrived on last evening, but brought me no official letters from the Seat of Government. “Perfect tranquility continues to prevail here; but really the burdens of the temporary Government are at present peculiarly hard upon me; and are becoming more so every day. “I am compelled to exercise more authority than I had contemplated. I fear my Decrees...
Mr. Briggs and Mr. Williams of whose arrival in this City, I informed you in my last , have been detained longer than they had calculated on; they will however, sail on tomorrow in a Vessel bound for Philadelphia, but the Captain has promised to land them at Charleston if the wind should admit of it. I think it probable that these gentlemen will reach the seat of Government early in April....
9 March 1804, New Orleans. “The former Spanish Secretary for this Province, Don André [López Armesto] waited upon me this morning, and said that two vessels were now taking in the military Stores of his Catholic Majesty and that between the 15th. and 20th. instant the Troops, Arms &c of Spain will all be embarked for Pensacola.” Received a letter “this morning” from Laussat stating “that the...
In a paper which was received by the last mail from the Seat of Government, it was stated that a law had passed the Senate prohibiting the foreign importation of Slaves into this Province. This intelligence has occasioned great agitation in this city and in the adjacent Settlements. The African trade has hitherto been lucrative, and the farmers are desirous of increasing the number of their...
10 March 1804, New Orleans. Has been informed by Daniel Clark that he considers himself no longer authorized to expend the sums appropriated for the relief of seamen in New Orleans. Presumes Clark is correct and asks “that this humane duty be re-committed” to Clark or another person. “There cannot any where exist a greater necessity for a provision of the kind alluded to, than in this port....
Since our last of the 27. ulto. a Duplicate of which goes under Cover, the Spaniards have sent off a small Part of their Troops; and we have received repeated verbal Assurances from several of their Officers that a final Evacuation by them is fixed for the 20 of the present Month; and appearances seem to indicate the Reality of their Intention. We have received two Letters from the...
Two men of the names of Sutton and May were lately convicted in the Mississippi Territory of piracy and felony, and have since been executed. These men were two of Mason’s party; who committed such frequent outrages on the Mississippi river, and on the Wilderness road. This banditti had become a terror to all persons who navigated the Mississippi river or travelled the Wilderness road, and a...
The meeting of which I advised you in my letter of the 10th inst. has taken place. The assembly was more numerous than I had expected, and was composed principally of respectable merchants of New-Orleans, and farmers in its vicinity; but few Americans were present. The meeting was held at the house of a private gentleman, and conducted with some decorum. Through the polite attention of a...
16 March 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a copy of three Ordinances which I have lately passed; one of which contains a Charter for a Bank. “The establishment of a Bank in this city was much wished for by the inhabitants and I believe will prove of great utility: but I must confess I should not have ventured upon the measure from these considerations alone.” Learned of efforts to make the...
24 March 1804, New Orleans. “I have received your letter of the 20th ultimo and which is the only communication from you that has reached me since my arrival here, and even this was not permitted to pass without being perused by some abandoned person, for the seal was broken when it was handed me. It will indeed be a difficult task, to discover where the abuses in the Post department are...
24 March 1804, New Orleans. “The contents of your private letter gave me great pleasure; the permanent residence of Moralis in Louisiana, I should greatly regret.… “The Marquis De Casa Calvo is the enemy of Moralis, and a hint from me to the Marquis, that Moralis’s removal from Louisiana, would be agreeable, will (I believe) effect the object. “Moralis is a sensible, intrigueing, designing,...
25 March 1804, New Orleans. “In a conversation some days ago, with Major Stephen Minor,” was told “that some men in the Mississippi Territory who had heretofore been most clamorous against the Land Speculation, had now become conspicuous Speculators, and that an officer of the Government , had, (to his own knowledge) been guilty of what he conceived a fraudulent transaction.” Asked Minor to...
30 March 1804, New Orleans. “Since our last of the 11 instant, a Duplicate of which is under cover we have received the Remainder of the public Records of the Province. The Delivery of the Store-Houses and Magazines & the Evacuation of the City by the Spanish Troops are the only important unfinished Objects relating to our Commission.” Enclose a 27 Mar. 1804 letter from Laussat showing “that...
31 March 1804, New Orleans. “The laws regulating the commerce of Louisiana, have been received here and that which relates to the registering of vessels has given great satisfaction. We have also seen the law providing for a temporary Government in the shape it passed the Senate; the prohibiting the importation of Slaves is a source of great dissatisfaction.” Believes the people will express...
3 April 1804, New Orleans. “In consequence of a Deposition forwarded to me by a Mr. Bailey, of which the enclosed No. 1 is a copy, I addressed on the 28th Ultimo to the Marquis De Casa Calvo a letter of which the enclosed No. 2 is a copy, when the answer of the Marquis is received you shall be advised thereof.” Letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosures ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive...
7 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have received an answer to the letter which I addressed to the Marquis De Casa Calvo on the 28th. ultimo; a translation of the answer and of the documents accompanying it are preparing, and when completed, the originals shall be transmitted to you. It seems La Coquette was fitted out at this place, and was permitted to depart after the receipt of assurances from...
8 April 1804, New Orleans. “Enclosed is a copy of an inflamatory production which was posted up at the Markethouse in this City, in the course of last night. “At 8 O’clock this morning I heard of this writing, and immediately caused it to be taken down. The Author is not known, but the general suspicion attaches to some of the late emigrants. “I find that this inflamatory address, is greatly...
9 April 1804, New Orleans. “The Patroles on last night arrested twelve or fifteen Spanish Soldiers and Sailors who were lurking about the City, probably with a design of deserting and they were on this morning delivered to a Spanish officer. “The greater part of the Spanish forces have this moment taken their departure for Pensacola; they were embarked on board of a Ship, and their numbers...
10 April 1804, New Orleans. “Tranquility continues to reign in this city and its vicinity. M. Laussat takes his leave of the Spanish Commissioners on this day; and the day after tomorrow he proposes to pay his last visit to the American Commissioners. His departure therefore it is expected will take place in a few days. The Barracks evacuated by the Spanish troops have been put in our...
10 April 1804, New Orleans. “Last Sunday I made a visit to the Convent in this City and was received by the Nuns with every mark of respect. “To an affectionate and complimentary Address, which was presented me, I returned an answer a Copy of which is enclosed. “I am much pleased with this institution; the Nuns have uniformly supported the most amiable character and the education of female...
11 April 1804, New Orleans. “The inflam’atory address (enclosed you in my letter of the 8th. instant) is very generally censured, and I have been requested by a number of respectable citizens to offer a reward for the discovery of this incendiary and (when discovered) to punish him with severity. Lest however, a consequence might be attached to this unimportant affair both here and in the...
13 April 1804, New Orleans. “On last evening, I received your letter of the 12th. Ultimo. “The difficulties with respect to the Ship from St. Domingo have all passed by. The correspondence between the Commissioners of the United States and M. Laussat Copies of which, have been forwarded to you, will inform you particularly as to that vessel. “I must confess, that my opposition to the approach...
14 April 1804, New Orleans. “The Federal paper containing an account of my letter of the 2nd of January and which I referred to in my last [not found] was forwarded to this City in great numbers; it occasioned for a day or two much talk, and many of the citizens expressed some discontent, at my representing the whole society (as was erroneously stated by the listener in the gallery) as...
14 April 1804, New Orleans. “I now enclose you the answer of the Marquis De Casa Calvo to my letter of the 28th ultimo. Having obtained for my own use a translation of the Marquis’s letter and the documents accompanying it, I have forwarded to you, the originals.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 59, TP , Orleans, vol. 4); letterbook copy ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive Journal, vol. 13). RC 1 p.;...
14 April 1804, New Orleans. “I this morning received information from the officer commanding at Plaquemines, that he had brought to, opposite the Fort a French Privateer of Five Guns, and added that the vessel was in a leaky condition and in want of provisions: Shortly thereafter, I received from M. Laussat a letter upon the subject, a Copy of which No. 1 is enclosed, to which I returned the...
21 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have nothing interesting to communicate, nor would I write you by this mail, were it not to inform you, that the most perfect good order prevails in this city. I find, the most trifling occurrences here, attract attention to the Northward, and that a disposition exists among some people to give to certain events a consequence they do not merit: To prevent...
25 April 1804, New Orleans. “The French privateer mentioned in my letter of the 14th. instant, has just arrived at this port; I enclose you a Copy of the report of Dr. Watkins relative to this vessel, and also, of my instructions to the Harbour Master. “General Wilkinson sailed for New-York on this morning, on board the Ship Louisiana. “It is understood that M. Laussat took his departure on...
3 May 1804, New Orleans. “On last evening I had the Honour to receive your Letters of the 6th of February and 2nd of April. The delay of the first I cannot account for, nor do I know what has become of the communication to General Wilkinson and myself, which was said to be enclosed therein. On opening the Packet the Letter referred to was missing. This induced me to examine the Wafers, there...
8 May 1804, New Orleans. “The enclosed proclamation of the Captain General of Cuba, was transmitted to me, yesterday by the Marquis of Casa Calvo, who has often expressed to me the desire of his Catholic Majesty to observe the Strictest neutrality during the present War. “The emigration from the West Indies to Louisiana continues great; few vessels arrive from that quarter, but are crowded...
10 May 1804, New Orleans. “Mr. Lyon has agreed to reprint, in his paper, the Laws of the United States upon the terms you proposed; but in full expectation that when you are acquainted with the high expenses attending his establishment, you will augment his compensation. Of these expenses Mr. Lyon can inform you in person, and I believe they are infinitely greater than the printers in any...
10 May 1804, New Orleans. “Your letter of the 9th. ultimo, together with its enclosures, I have this moment received and beg you to be assured of my faithful attention thereto. “The Spanish Commissioner the Marquis of Casa Calvo, the late Governor Salcedo, and the Intendant Moralis, are yet here; the Marquis contemplates a long residence; Salcedo is making preparations to retire to the...
I this moment met with the enclosed letter from Mr. Matthew Lyon to his constituents, and I sincerely hope it may be the only Copy that has reached this city. As a Western man, I feel myself under no obligations to Mr. Lyon for his boasted zeal for the Western interest, and although I am not disposed to question the purity of his motives, I am firmly persuaded, that during the last Session, he...
13 May 1804, New Orleans. “I received on this morning the enclosed letter from Captain Turner, the Commandant Civil and Military of the District of Nachitoches on the Red River, and immediately returned an Answer of which the paper, marked A, is a copy. “In my letter to you of the 10h. instant, I mentioned that, the Marquis of Casa Calvo, Governor Salcedo, and the Intendant, Moralis, were...
14 May 1804, New Orleans. “On this morning, I received the enclosed letter from the Commandant of the District of Ouachitas and returned the answer of which the paper marked B is a copy. “You will have discovered, that some time had elapsed after the delivery of Louisiana to the United States, before the posts of Nachitoches and Ouachitas were taken possession of by our troops; This delay...
20 May 1804, New Orleans. “The Treaty ceding Louisiana to Spain in 1762 and her act of acceptance I have not been able to meet with among any of the records in this City. In the Archives of the Cabildo (now in possession of the Municipality) I find no traces of any events prior to the arrival of General O’Reilly. “The proceedings of the Supreme Council of New Orleans (under the Government of...
24 May 1804, New Orleans. “In my letter of the 24th. of January I mentioned the agitation in the public mind which the case of St. Julien (on a charge of murder) had occasioned here, and the line of conduct I had pursued. I now enclose the translation of a late letter to me from the Marquis of Casa Calvo on this subject (No. 1), and a copy of my answer (No. 2.). A copy of the Prefect’s...
24 May 1804, New Orleans. “There exists a great hatred between the Marquis of Casa Calvo and the late Intendant Morales, and at this time their exertions are mutual to ruin each other. “The contest is taking such a direction that, the probability is, one of them will lose the confidence of the Court; My private opinion is that, the Marquis is infinitely the most deserving character, and I...
I received by the last mail a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury in which my Ordinance for the establishment of the Louisiana Bank is greatly censured. My reply to Mr. Gallatin’s letter fully explains the motives and reasons which influenced my conduct on that occasion, and I beg you Sir, to ask Mr. Gallatin for a perusal of it . The Louisiana Bank will probably die of itself: Only one...
29 May 1804, New Orleans. “In the District of Atakapas a very great dispute has arisen between two Priests. A man of the name of Barrier was superceded by M. Laussat, and a priest of the name of Veal named his sucessor. “Lately the Head of the Catholic Church in Louisiana, a Mr. Welsh, recalled Veal declared his powers under M. Laussat nul and reinstated Barrier. “A few Sundays since, the...
30 May 1804, New Orleans. “I was honored on last evening with the receipt of your letter of the 1st. Instant. “I consider peace as the greatest of national blessings, and there is nothing I should more lament than to see my country involved in war with any of the European powers. The formal recession therefore of the King of Spain from his objections to the transfer of Louisiana to the United...
2 June 1804, New Orleans. “I received on last evening a letter from Governor Folch of Pensacola, of which the enclosed No. 1 is a translation, and returned on this morning, an answer, of which the enclosure No. 2. is a copy. I was much disposed to have answered Governor Folch’s letter with some asperity, but thinking that, a Conciliatory Style, would be more agreeable to the Executive, I...
When my old acquaintance Edward Livingston arrived in this City, he seemed determined perseveringly to pursue his profession, with a view of restoring his fortune, and on the subject of politics, he expressed an ardent wish to see the present administration prosper, but declared it to be his interest not to be concerned in public business. His talents, address, connexions, and the high...
3 June 1804, New Orleans. “On yesterday James Pitot and Edward Livingston attended at my office and handed me, the communication, which is herein enclosed; After perusing the same, I replied verbally, that, ‘the people had a right peaceably to assemble together for the purpose of remonstrating against grievances; but it became those who produced such assemblages to be watchful of the public...
7 June 1804, New Orleans. “On my arrival in Louisiana I was frequently applied to by different persons for permission to trade with certain Indian tribes, west of the Mississippi and within the province of Louisiana. “With a view of conciliating the affections of the Indians by preventing unjust and unprincipled men from participating in their trade, I gave instructions to the Commandants of...
9 June 1804, New Orleans. “Captain Turner the Commandant at Nachitoches, in a letter to me dated the 27th. Ultimo, says—‘Every thing is at present tranquil, and the people appear satisfied with their condition.’ He adds—’I learn that, the Spaniards are strengthening the garrison at Nacogdoches; that all persons from Louisiana are prohibited settling on this side of St. Antonio, and no repairs...
16 June 1804, New Orleans. “I have the Honour to enclose you an estimate of the expense which will attend the support of the Government of the Orleans Territory for one year ensuing the 1st of October next. “The Council being appointed by the President, and their ⅌ diem allowance fixed by a Law of Congress, I have supposed their pay would be drawn from the Treasury of the United States; but I...
22 June 1804, New Orleans. “The twenty passports you lately forwarded, are nearly all distributed. The commerce of this City is great and increasing, and I find that the Louisianians are very fond of visiting Europe; I request therefore, that, an additional number of blank passports may be furnished me, or otherwise, I shall not be enabled to present the Louisianians going abroad with a...
27 June 1804, New Orleans. “On yesterday the Marquis of Cassa Calvo (accompanied by his Secretary Don André) made me a visit; we were in private for some time, and conversed freely upon various subjects. “The Marquis had received information from Colonel Grandpré Commandant at Batton Rouge, of a recent riot in the vicinity of that Post, which had occasioned him some inquietude; Colo. Grandpré...
28 June 1804, New Orleans. “Since the heat of Summer commenced, my attention to business has been incessant, but I discover that neither myself or the Gentlemen in my employ, can longer preserve our health, if the Office-hours are not curtailed ; and to enable me to do so , I find myself compelled to engage one and perhaps two additional Clerks. Mr. Briggs my private Secretary, is now sick of...