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Documents filtered by: Author="Claiborne, William C. C."
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Having understood that there were several Parishes or Districts in Louisiana, whose former Commandants had declined acting under the American Government; that the inhabitants were becoming discontented and in some instances that disorders had ensued, I deemed it adviseable immediately to appoint the necessary Civil Officers, and by some verbal communications to endeavor to impress the minds of...
2 March 1804, New Orleans. “The northern mail arrived on last evening, but brought me no official letters from the Seat of Government. “Perfect tranquility continues to prevail here; but really the burdens of the temporary Government are at present peculiarly hard upon me; and are becoming more so every day. “I am compelled to exercise more authority than I had contemplated. I fear my Decrees...
Mr. Briggs and Mr. Williams of whose arrival in this City, I informed you in my last , have been detained longer than they had calculated on; they will however, sail on tomorrow in a Vessel bound for Philadelphia, but the Captain has promised to land them at Charleston if the wind should admit of it. I think it probable that these gentlemen will reach the seat of Government early in April....
9 March 1804, New Orleans. “The former Spanish Secretary for this Province, Don André [López Armesto] waited upon me this morning, and said that two vessels were now taking in the military Stores of his Catholic Majesty and that between the 15th. and 20th. instant the Troops, Arms &c of Spain will all be embarked for Pensacola.” Received a letter “this morning” from Laussat stating “that the...
In a paper which was received by the last mail from the Seat of Government, it was stated that a law had passed the Senate prohibiting the foreign importation of Slaves into this Province. This intelligence has occasioned great agitation in this city and in the adjacent Settlements. The African trade has hitherto been lucrative, and the farmers are desirous of increasing the number of their...
10 March 1804, New Orleans. Has been informed by Daniel Clark that he considers himself no longer authorized to expend the sums appropriated for the relief of seamen in New Orleans. Presumes Clark is correct and asks “that this humane duty be re-committed” to Clark or another person. “There cannot any where exist a greater necessity for a provision of the kind alluded to, than in this port....
Since our last of the 27. ulto. a Duplicate of which goes under Cover, the Spaniards have sent off a small Part of their Troops; and we have received repeated verbal Assurances from several of their Officers that a final Evacuation by them is fixed for the 20 of the present Month; and appearances seem to indicate the Reality of their Intention. We have received two Letters from the...
Two men of the names of Sutton and May were lately convicted in the Mississippi Territory of piracy and felony, and have since been executed. These men were two of Mason’s party; who committed such frequent outrages on the Mississippi river, and on the Wilderness road. This banditti had become a terror to all persons who navigated the Mississippi river or travelled the Wilderness road, and a...
The meeting of which I advised you in my letter of the 10th inst. has taken place. The assembly was more numerous than I had expected, and was composed principally of respectable merchants of New-Orleans, and farmers in its vicinity; but few Americans were present. The meeting was held at the house of a private gentleman, and conducted with some decorum. Through the polite attention of a...
16 March 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a copy of three Ordinances which I have lately passed; one of which contains a Charter for a Bank. “The establishment of a Bank in this city was much wished for by the inhabitants and I believe will prove of great utility: but I must confess I should not have ventured upon the measure from these considerations alone.” Learned of efforts to make the...
24 March 1804, New Orleans. “I have received your letter of the 20th ultimo and which is the only communication from you that has reached me since my arrival here, and even this was not permitted to pass without being perused by some abandoned person, for the seal was broken when it was handed me. It will indeed be a difficult task, to discover where the abuses in the Post department are...
24 March 1804, New Orleans. “The contents of your private letter gave me great pleasure; the permanent residence of Moralis in Louisiana, I should greatly regret.… “The Marquis De Casa Calvo is the enemy of Moralis, and a hint from me to the Marquis, that Moralis’s removal from Louisiana, would be agreeable, will (I believe) effect the object. “Moralis is a sensible, intrigueing, designing,...
25 March 1804, New Orleans. “In a conversation some days ago, with Major Stephen Minor,” was told “that some men in the Mississippi Territory who had heretofore been most clamorous against the Land Speculation, had now become conspicuous Speculators, and that an officer of the Government , had, (to his own knowledge) been guilty of what he conceived a fraudulent transaction.” Asked Minor to...
30 March 1804, New Orleans. “Since our last of the 11 instant, a Duplicate of which is under cover we have received the Remainder of the public Records of the Province. The Delivery of the Store-Houses and Magazines & the Evacuation of the City by the Spanish Troops are the only important unfinished Objects relating to our Commission.” Enclose a 27 Mar. 1804 letter from Laussat showing “that...
31 March 1804, New Orleans. “The laws regulating the commerce of Louisiana, have been received here and that which relates to the registering of vessels has given great satisfaction. We have also seen the law providing for a temporary Government in the shape it passed the Senate; the prohibiting the importation of Slaves is a source of great dissatisfaction.” Believes the people will express...
3 April 1804, New Orleans. “In consequence of a Deposition forwarded to me by a Mr. Bailey, of which the enclosed No. 1 is a copy, I addressed on the 28th Ultimo to the Marquis De Casa Calvo a letter of which the enclosed No. 2 is a copy, when the answer of the Marquis is received you shall be advised thereof.” Letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosures ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive...
7 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have received an answer to the letter which I addressed to the Marquis De Casa Calvo on the 28th. ultimo; a translation of the answer and of the documents accompanying it are preparing, and when completed, the originals shall be transmitted to you. It seems La Coquette was fitted out at this place, and was permitted to depart after the receipt of assurances from...
8 April 1804, New Orleans. “Enclosed is a copy of an inflamatory production which was posted up at the Markethouse in this City, in the course of last night. “At 8 O’clock this morning I heard of this writing, and immediately caused it to be taken down. The Author is not known, but the general suspicion attaches to some of the late emigrants. “I find that this inflamatory address, is greatly...
9 April 1804, New Orleans. “The Patroles on last night arrested twelve or fifteen Spanish Soldiers and Sailors who were lurking about the City, probably with a design of deserting and they were on this morning delivered to a Spanish officer. “The greater part of the Spanish forces have this moment taken their departure for Pensacola; they were embarked on board of a Ship, and their numbers...
10 April 1804, New Orleans. “Tranquility continues to reign in this city and its vicinity. M. Laussat takes his leave of the Spanish Commissioners on this day; and the day after tomorrow he proposes to pay his last visit to the American Commissioners. His departure therefore it is expected will take place in a few days. The Barracks evacuated by the Spanish troops have been put in our...
10 April 1804, New Orleans. “Last Sunday I made a visit to the Convent in this City and was received by the Nuns with every mark of respect. “To an affectionate and complimentary Address, which was presented me, I returned an answer a Copy of which is enclosed. “I am much pleased with this institution; the Nuns have uniformly supported the most amiable character and the education of female...
11 April 1804, New Orleans. “The inflam’atory address (enclosed you in my letter of the 8th. instant) is very generally censured, and I have been requested by a number of respectable citizens to offer a reward for the discovery of this incendiary and (when discovered) to punish him with severity. Lest however, a consequence might be attached to this unimportant affair both here and in the...
13 April 1804, New Orleans. “On last evening, I received your letter of the 12th. Ultimo. “The difficulties with respect to the Ship from St. Domingo have all passed by. The correspondence between the Commissioners of the United States and M. Laussat Copies of which, have been forwarded to you, will inform you particularly as to that vessel. “I must confess, that my opposition to the approach...
14 April 1804, New Orleans. “The Federal paper containing an account of my letter of the 2nd of January and which I referred to in my last [not found] was forwarded to this City in great numbers; it occasioned for a day or two much talk, and many of the citizens expressed some discontent, at my representing the whole society (as was erroneously stated by the listener in the gallery) as...
14 April 1804, New Orleans. “I now enclose you the answer of the Marquis De Casa Calvo to my letter of the 28th ultimo. Having obtained for my own use a translation of the Marquis’s letter and the documents accompanying it, I have forwarded to you, the originals.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 59, TP , Orleans, vol. 4); letterbook copy ( Ms-Ar : Claiborne Executive Journal, vol. 13). RC 1 p.;...
14 April 1804, New Orleans. “I this morning received information from the officer commanding at Plaquemines, that he had brought to, opposite the Fort a French Privateer of Five Guns, and added that the vessel was in a leaky condition and in want of provisions: Shortly thereafter, I received from M. Laussat a letter upon the subject, a Copy of which No. 1 is enclosed, to which I returned the...
21 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have nothing interesting to communicate, nor would I write you by this mail, were it not to inform you, that the most perfect good order prevails in this city. I find, the most trifling occurrences here, attract attention to the Northward, and that a disposition exists among some people to give to certain events a consequence they do not merit: To prevent...
25 April 1804, New Orleans. “The French privateer mentioned in my letter of the 14th. instant, has just arrived at this port; I enclose you a Copy of the report of Dr. Watkins relative to this vessel, and also, of my instructions to the Harbour Master. “General Wilkinson sailed for New-York on this morning, on board the Ship Louisiana. “It is understood that M. Laussat took his departure on...
3 May 1804, New Orleans. “On last evening I had the Honour to receive your Letters of the 6th of February and 2nd of April. The delay of the first I cannot account for, nor do I know what has become of the communication to General Wilkinson and myself, which was said to be enclosed therein. On opening the Packet the Letter referred to was missing. This induced me to examine the Wafers, there...
8 May 1804, New Orleans. “The enclosed proclamation of the Captain General of Cuba, was transmitted to me, yesterday by the Marquis of Casa Calvo, who has often expressed to me the desire of his Catholic Majesty to observe the Strictest neutrality during the present War. “The emigration from the West Indies to Louisiana continues great; few vessels arrive from that quarter, but are crowded...