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    • Claiborne, William C. C.
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Claiborne, William C. C." AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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14 April 1804, New Orleans. “I this morning received information from the officer commanding at Plaquemines, that he had brought to, opposite the Fort a French Privateer of Five Guns, and added that the vessel was in a leaky condition and in want of provisions: Shortly thereafter, I received from M. Laussat a letter upon the subject, a Copy of which No. 1 is enclosed, to which I returned the...
21 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have nothing interesting to communicate, nor would I write you by this mail, were it not to inform you, that the most perfect good order prevails in this city. I find, the most trifling occurrences here, attract attention to the Northward, and that a disposition exists among some people to give to certain events a consequence they do not merit: To prevent...
25 April 1804, New Orleans. “The French privateer mentioned in my letter of the 14th. instant, has just arrived at this port; I enclose you a Copy of the report of Dr. Watkins relative to this vessel, and also, of my instructions to the Harbour Master. “General Wilkinson sailed for New-York on this morning, on board the Ship Louisiana. “It is understood that M. Laussat took his departure on...
3 May 1804, New Orleans. “On last evening I had the Honour to receive your Letters of the 6th of February and 2nd of April. The delay of the first I cannot account for, nor do I know what has become of the communication to General Wilkinson and myself, which was said to be enclosed therein. On opening the Packet the Letter referred to was missing. This induced me to examine the Wafers, there...
8 May 1804, New Orleans. “The enclosed proclamation of the Captain General of Cuba, was transmitted to me, yesterday by the Marquis of Casa Calvo, who has often expressed to me the desire of his Catholic Majesty to observe the Strictest neutrality during the present War. “The emigration from the West Indies to Louisiana continues great; few vessels arrive from that quarter, but are crowded...
10 May 1804, New Orleans. “Mr. Lyon has agreed to reprint, in his paper, the Laws of the United States upon the terms you proposed; but in full expectation that when you are acquainted with the high expenses attending his establishment, you will augment his compensation. Of these expenses Mr. Lyon can inform you in person, and I believe they are infinitely greater than the printers in any...
10 May 1804, New Orleans. “Your letter of the 9th. ultimo, together with its enclosures, I have this moment received and beg you to be assured of my faithful attention thereto. “The Spanish Commissioner the Marquis of Casa Calvo, the late Governor Salcedo, and the Intendant Moralis, are yet here; the Marquis contemplates a long residence; Salcedo is making preparations to retire to the...
I this moment met with the enclosed letter from Mr. Matthew Lyon to his constituents, and I sincerely hope it may be the only Copy that has reached this city. As a Western man, I feel myself under no obligations to Mr. Lyon for his boasted zeal for the Western interest, and although I am not disposed to question the purity of his motives, I am firmly persuaded, that during the last Session, he...
13 May 1804, New Orleans. “I received on this morning the enclosed letter from Captain Turner, the Commandant Civil and Military of the District of Nachitoches on the Red River, and immediately returned an Answer of which the paper, marked A, is a copy. “In my letter to you of the 10h. instant, I mentioned that, the Marquis of Casa Calvo, Governor Salcedo, and the Intendant, Moralis, were...
14 May 1804, New Orleans. “On this morning, I received the enclosed letter from the Commandant of the District of Ouachitas and returned the answer of which the paper marked B is a copy. “You will have discovered, that some time had elapsed after the delivery of Louisiana to the United States, before the posts of Nachitoches and Ouachitas were taken possession of by our troops; This delay...
20 May 1804, New Orleans. “The Treaty ceding Louisiana to Spain in 1762 and her act of acceptance I have not been able to meet with among any of the records in this City. In the Archives of the Cabildo (now in possession of the Municipality) I find no traces of any events prior to the arrival of General O’Reilly. “The proceedings of the Supreme Council of New Orleans (under the Government of...
24 May 1804, New Orleans. “In my letter of the 24th. of January I mentioned the agitation in the public mind which the case of St. Julien (on a charge of murder) had occasioned here, and the line of conduct I had pursued. I now enclose the translation of a late letter to me from the Marquis of Casa Calvo on this subject (No. 1), and a copy of my answer (No. 2.). A copy of the Prefect’s...
24 May 1804, New Orleans. “There exists a great hatred between the Marquis of Casa Calvo and the late Intendant Morales, and at this time their exertions are mutual to ruin each other. “The contest is taking such a direction that, the probability is, one of them will lose the confidence of the Court; My private opinion is that, the Marquis is infinitely the most deserving character, and I...
I received by the last mail a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury in which my Ordinance for the establishment of the Louisiana Bank is greatly censured. My reply to Mr. Gallatin’s letter fully explains the motives and reasons which influenced my conduct on that occasion, and I beg you Sir, to ask Mr. Gallatin for a perusal of it . The Louisiana Bank will probably die of itself: Only one...
29 May 1804, New Orleans. “In the District of Atakapas a very great dispute has arisen between two Priests. A man of the name of Barrier was superceded by M. Laussat, and a priest of the name of Veal named his sucessor. “Lately the Head of the Catholic Church in Louisiana, a Mr. Welsh, recalled Veal declared his powers under M. Laussat nul and reinstated Barrier. “A few Sundays since, the...
30 May 1804, New Orleans. “I was honored on last evening with the receipt of your letter of the 1st. Instant. “I consider peace as the greatest of national blessings, and there is nothing I should more lament than to see my country involved in war with any of the European powers. The formal recession therefore of the King of Spain from his objections to the transfer of Louisiana to the United...
2 June 1804, New Orleans. “I received on last evening a letter from Governor Folch of Pensacola, of which the enclosed No. 1 is a translation, and returned on this morning, an answer, of which the enclosure No. 2. is a copy. I was much disposed to have answered Governor Folch’s letter with some asperity, but thinking that, a Conciliatory Style, would be more agreeable to the Executive, I...
When my old acquaintance Edward Livingston arrived in this City, he seemed determined perseveringly to pursue his profession, with a view of restoring his fortune, and on the subject of politics, he expressed an ardent wish to see the present administration prosper, but declared it to be his interest not to be concerned in public business. His talents, address, connexions, and the high...
3 June 1804, New Orleans. “On yesterday James Pitot and Edward Livingston attended at my office and handed me, the communication, which is herein enclosed; After perusing the same, I replied verbally, that, ‘the people had a right peaceably to assemble together for the purpose of remonstrating against grievances; but it became those who produced such assemblages to be watchful of the public...
7 June 1804, New Orleans. “On my arrival in Louisiana I was frequently applied to by different persons for permission to trade with certain Indian tribes, west of the Mississippi and within the province of Louisiana. “With a view of conciliating the affections of the Indians by preventing unjust and unprincipled men from participating in their trade, I gave instructions to the Commandants of...
9 June 1804, New Orleans. “Captain Turner the Commandant at Nachitoches, in a letter to me dated the 27th. Ultimo, says—‘Every thing is at present tranquil, and the people appear satisfied with their condition.’ He adds—’I learn that, the Spaniards are strengthening the garrison at Nacogdoches; that all persons from Louisiana are prohibited settling on this side of St. Antonio, and no repairs...
16 June 1804, New Orleans. “I have the Honour to enclose you an estimate of the expense which will attend the support of the Government of the Orleans Territory for one year ensuing the 1st of October next. “The Council being appointed by the President, and their ⅌ diem allowance fixed by a Law of Congress, I have supposed their pay would be drawn from the Treasury of the United States; but I...
22 June 1804, New Orleans. “The twenty passports you lately forwarded, are nearly all distributed. The commerce of this City is great and increasing, and I find that the Louisianians are very fond of visiting Europe; I request therefore, that, an additional number of blank passports may be furnished me, or otherwise, I shall not be enabled to present the Louisianians going abroad with a...
27 June 1804, New Orleans. “On yesterday the Marquis of Cassa Calvo (accompanied by his Secretary Don André) made me a visit; we were in private for some time, and conversed freely upon various subjects. “The Marquis had received information from Colonel Grandpré Commandant at Batton Rouge, of a recent riot in the vicinity of that Post, which had occasioned him some inquietude; Colo. Grandpré...
28 June 1804, New Orleans. “Since the heat of Summer commenced, my attention to business has been incessant, but I discover that neither myself or the Gentlemen in my employ, can longer preserve our health, if the Office-hours are not curtailed ; and to enable me to do so , I find myself compelled to engage one and perhaps two additional Clerks. Mr. Briggs my private Secretary, is now sick of...
In my official Letter of the third of June, I informed you of a small Assemblage of Citizens in New-Orleans, whose object was to forward an Address to Congress, relative to their local Government. Since that period, Mr. Edward Livingston has been engaged in framing the Memorial, and preparing the Citizens of this place & its vicinity for the reception of the principles which it contains. I...
1 July 1804, New Orleans. “In the forenoon of this day a number of the citizens of this place and some of the farmers in its vicinity assembled for the purpose of considering a memorial to Congress previously drawn by a committee. The memorial is attributed to Mr. Edward Livingston, and is said to be a good piece of composition; the object of it (I learn) is to obtain the immediate...
3 July 1804, New Orleans. “The Free People of Colour have manifested some dissatisfaction at not receiving an invitation to the meeting of citizens who adopted the memorial to Congress. A piece addressed to the Freemen of Colour and signed by an influential character among them, inviting a meeting in order that they might consult together as to their rights, and the propriety on their part of...
5 July 1804, New Orleans. “The birth-day of our country was passed here, in great harmony and hilarity: High mass was celebrated at the Cathedral church, at 7 in the morning and a prayer offered for the continuance of the happiness and prosperity of the United States. Two appropriate orations the one in the American, the other in the French language were delivered at the Hotel de ville to a...
7 July 1804, New Orleans. “The late slight appearance of discontent among the people of Colour, of which in my last letter I advised you, excited some alarm among the white Citizens , and has determined them to have no more meetings , after the one contemplated on tomorrow, and at that I suppose, but few will attend. “The Louisianians have as little mischief in their dispositions, and as much...
12 July 1804, New Orleans. “The letter which was handed to a printer for publication inviting a meeting of the free people of Colour for the purpose of Memorializing Congress, occasioned an inquietude among the White inhabitants which is just now beginning to subside. The Municipality of New-Orleans expressed a wish that I should punish the Mulatto man who handed the letter to the printer with...
13 July 1804, New Orleans. “The Memorial to Congress, of which I have lately Spoken in several of my official letters, is in circulation, and has obtained many signatures. I have seen one sheet of the original manuscript; it is in the hand writing of Edward Livingston, and the whole was no doubt written by that gentleman, by and with the advice of Daniel Clark and Evan Jones. “The Memorial is...
14 July 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you the last number of the Moniteur , printed in this city. It contains an account of the proceedings of a number of citizens who had assembled for the purpose of praying Congress for redress of their grievances, and also a singular publication from the Marquis of Casa Calvo together with an address signed (it is said) by many of the ancient and...
15 July 1804, New Orleans. “Scarcely a week passes by, but something occurs to create anxiety, and to occasion me trouble. “On yesterday, in commemoration of the destruction of the Bastile a number of Frenchmen assembled to pass the day in joy and festivity. They hoisted the French flag and sung their favourite national songs. The waving of the flag excited the jealousy of the Americans , and...
25 July 1804, New Orleans. “In my letter of the 14th. instant I enclosed you a copy of the Moniteur (No. 422) containing an address from a number of the citizens of Louisiana to the Marquis of Casa Calvo accompanied by certain remarks from the Marquis. “The enclosure No. 1, is a literal translation of the remarks of the Marquis and that No. 2, is a copy of a letter which I this day addressed...
25 July 1804, New Orleans. “On this afternoon, I received by express from Captain Turner a dispatch, of which the enclosures are copies. “Nothing can be more certain, than that the possession of the West bank of the Mississippi by the United States is a source of discontent to the Officers and Satellites of the Spanish Monarchy now in Louisiana, and I learn that the sensibilities of the public...
26 July 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you a paper containing a Memorial to Congress, of which I have heretofore advised you. It is generally acknowledged, that Mr. Edward Livingston is the author of this production, and indeed he himself avows it. Mr. Daniel Clark is to carry the memorial to several Districts and to solicit Signatures. He sets out on his mission (I learn) on tomorrow, and...
27 July 1804, New Orleans. “I received on this morning an answer to my letter of the 25th instant to the Marquis of Casa Calvo, and having procured a translation thereof, for my own use, I now enclose you the original Copy . “The answer of the Marquis developes in part the views of his court in relation to Louisiana; every exertion has been and will be made to conciliate and perpetuate the...
30 July 1804, New Orleans. “Your letters of the 19th. & 26th of June , together with their enclosures I have had the honor to receive. “I shall inform Mr. Pedesclaux, and M. De Clouet of the reasons which induced the President of the United States not to interfere in their cases, and shall refer the former to Congress for a further prosecution of his claim, should he still think it...
1 August 1804, New Orleans. “More than two months ago, I received information that a small French privateer, in company with two brigs, the one under French and the other Spanish Colours had entered the Mississippi. “The brigs anchored in the river below Plaquemines , and the privateer with my permission passed that Fort , and came to, about two leagues below this city. Rumour soon pronounced...
4 August 1804, New Orleans. “Since my letter of the 1st. instant, the Captain of the privateer, has shewn me the papers of the prize brig Active, from which it appears, that she was built at St. Johns New Brunswick, and is the property of William Pagan, Robert Pagan and Thomas Pagan Merchants of said place. “The Active was commanded by a Captain Rasor, and when taken by the Privateer was on...
4 August 1804, New Orleans. “I enclose you copies of two letters which I this morning received from Captain Turner the Commandant at Nachitoches. “The Caddo Indians spoken of by Captain Turner is a small tribe situated about 80 or 100 leagues from Nachitoches; their warriors are supposed to amount to between three or four hundred; I shall invite the chief of the nation and five or six of his...
9 August 1804, New Orleans. “In the District of Atakapas where party feuds and much general disquietude prevailed on our taking possession of this Province, I have the pleasure to inform you that the most perfect good order now exists, this favorable change is attributed in some degree to the conduct of a very young but I believe a very deserving young officer of the name of Hopkins, who...
10 August 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 10th. Ultimo. “I am glad to understand your sentiments on the case of St. Julien; the more so as they entirely co-incide with my own. His bail I believe to be good, and even independent of that he and his friends seem so confident of his innocence that there appears at present no grounds to apprehend that...
30 August 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to enclose to you, a correspondence relative to the insurrection at Baton Rouge; consisting of a letter from the Marquis of Casa Calvo to myself, with my answer thereto, and letters of advice to the Secretary of the Mississippi Territory, and the Commandant at Point Coupé. “I am happy to inform you from late intelligence that this unpleasant...
30 August 1804, New Orleans. “In the commencement of my late illness I received from the Commandant of Nachitoches the letter No. 1, enclosing the petition of which No. 2 is a translation, and returned the answer No. 3. These papers would have been forwarded to the Department of State at an earlier period had not the rapid advance of my indisposition totally prevented me from attending to any...
1 September 1804, New Orleans. “I have this moment received from Captain Turner, Commandant at Nachitoches, the enclosed letter from a Mr. Davenport to Doctor Sibley, and hasten to transmit it to you. “This letter appears in some degree to confirm the information heretofore given by Captain Turner, (already forwarded to the Department of State) relative to a decree of the Spanish Government...
8 September 1804, New Orleans. “I have the honor to enclose you a copy of a letter which I addressed to the Marquis of Casa Calvo, upon the subject of the alarm excited at Nachitoches, in consequence of the reports from Nacogdoches , together with a translation of his answer thereto. “I should at an earlier period have addressed the Marquis on this subject, but was prevented by my late...
8 September 1804, New Orleans. “Enclosed is a translation of a letter to me from the Marquis of Casa Calvo, which will shew you the favorable disposition of the Governor-General of Cuba, towards the commerce of the United States, and the desire he feels to prevent Privateers from making sale of their prizes within the limits of his Government. “I have the pleasure to inform you, that the most...
16 September 1804, New Orleans. “Enclosed is a copy of a circular Letter I have addressed to the several civil commandants in Lower Louisiana. “I am not certain, but the Act of Congress does, on the first of October, virtually withdraw all Judicial Powers from the Authorities now existing in this Province; But in order to prevent those Scenes of anarchy and confusion which might arise in the...