You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Claiborne, William C. C.
  • Recipient

    • Jefferson, Thomas

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Claiborne, William C. C." AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 1-50 of 142 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Since my letter of the 14 th Instant , it has been deemed expedient to proceed against m r Livingston before the Parish court of New Orleans , by way of information , and of which a copy is herewith enclosed. M r
In the suit brought by Edward Livingston Against Le Breton D’orgenoy late marshal of the District of Orleans , The Honorable m r Hall , Judge of the District of Louisiana , has decided, the dispossessing of m r Livingston of the Batture , by order of the late President to be illegal, & he directs the Plaintiff to be reinstated in his possession.—The Public Sentiment on this occasion is...
I have the honor to enclose you a Copy of a Communication, I made on yesterday to the Territorial Legislature;—The Batture has not been introduced; But that shall be made the Subject of a Special message.— General Hampton left this a few days since for Baton Rouge ;— It is reported that on his Journey, he purchased the greater part of Mr D. Clarks landed property, and that the Consideration...
I have the pleasure to inform you, that the Laws of this Territory, is are enforced in every part of the Territory directed to be occupied by the Presidents Proclamation of the 27 th of October , except a small District around the Town & Fort of Mobile ;—There a Spanish Force is stationed, and must remain undisturbed, until the further Orders of my Government. I hope however these orders, will...
You will no doubt have seen the Proclamation by the President , which made it my duty to take possession of the Country extending from the Mississipi to the Perdido , in the name & in behalf of the United States .—In the discharge of that duty I now occupy the Fort of Baton Rouge , its dependencies & the Several adjoining Districts.—On my arrival at Baton Rouge, I had reason to apprehend...
Since my last Letter , I have made an agreeable Tour thro’ the Eastern States:—The encrease of population,—the progress of agriculture and manufactures—in a word, the prosperity of the Country, exceeded any thing, I had formed an idea of! The United States are in truth great and powerful, nor is there a Nation on earth, that has so much cause to approbate its Rulers.— Livingston , I learn, has...
In a Letter from M r Mather Mayor of N w Orleans , under date of the 23 rd of July , he speaks of the request I had made of him, to inform me of the Authority under which the Spanish Governors removed the Intruders from the Batture , and he says— “I have taken the advised steps to procure the information desired; but shall not be able to get answers from Mesrs Blanque and Moreau Lislet before...
I have the honor to enclose you attested Copies of a Petition to Congress from sundry Inhabitants of Orleans , and also of certain Resolutions entered into by the Legislative Council & House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans upon the subject of the Batture . These Documents support all the facts on which you relied, in directing possession to be taken of the Batture by the Marshal...
In a Letter which I addressed to the Mayor of New-Orleans , under date of the 7 h Instant , I requested him “to ascertain the sums of money expended by the Corporation, since the 20 h of December 1803 , and to transmit an account of the same to you.” I have supposed, that this information might prove useful in the Trial of Livingston’s Suit, and therefore I wish it to be laid before your...
Immediately on the Receipt of your favour of the Instant (which was handed me two days since), I addressed a Letter to the Mayor of New-Orleans , requesting him to Consult M r Moreau Lislet , as to the powers of the former Governors of Louisiana to remove persons who might intrude on the Batture ;— We know that an authority of the kind, was exercised by the
I have heard with great regret, that you should have been disturbed in your Retirement, by that restless and I fear most unprincipled man Edward Livingston . The Affair of the Batture , has assumed a Shape I had not anticipated; But whatever View of it may be taken, I feel assured (if the principles of immutable Justice should prevail) that the pretensions of Mr Livingston will be found...
In conformity to the request of the Legislative Council & House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans , I have the honor to transmit you certain Resolutions , expressive of their high sence of “your long, faithful & important public services,” & of their grateful recollection of your interference in the case of the Bature , the preservation of which as a Public Common, is considered...
I have the honor to enclose you a paper containing a late Report of the Adjutant General of this Territory upon the subject of the militia ; It will shew you the great difficulty which will attend the rendering of that force efficient.— Assured as I am, that in your retirement the welfare of your Country will be most dear to you, I shall do myself the pleasure from time to time, to acquaint...
I received your friendly note of the 30 th of November, enclosing a Letter to a Gentleman at the Arkansaw , which I immediately transmitted.— The Legislature of this Session Territory is now in session, and I have the honor to enclose for your perusal an address which I made to them a few days since.—You will excuse I hope Sir, the Liberty I propose to take with a Letter you did me the favour...
Believing that the discussion which the question as to the right of property in the Batture in front of the Suburb S t Mary , has given rise to, will not be uninteresting to you, I have the pleasure to enclose M r Thierry’s Answer to M r Duponceau ’s last Pamphlet. With the best wishes for your Health & happiness— RC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “M r
At the request of Colo: Liblong late an Officer in the Spanish service, and one of the most respectable and Antient Inhabitants of this City, I have the honor to enclose for your acceptance, a Tragedy in manuscript, of which the Colonel is himself the Author.—I do not know, that this production as relates to the stile & manner, possesses any peculiar merit; But when we bear in mind, that the...
Permit me the honor to introduce to your acquaintance, M r Poidrass , the Delegate from Orleans to the Congress of the United States . M r Poidrass possesses a great share of the esteem and confidence of his fellow Citizens, and has uniformly used his influence in support of the measures of the General Government. As relates to this Territory, there is no one more interested in its welfare...
Your Letter of the 29th of October has been received, and its enclosure delivered to the Gentleman to whom it was directed.—Mr Reibelt is certainly a very learned Man, and as far as I know a very honest one;—But he is illy calculated to fill an office under a Republican Government, nor indeed do I know any situation in which he could be so useful to Society, as in Character of an Instructer of...
In a former Letter, I mentioned the Opinions of certain Lawyers of Philadelphia, upon the subject of the Batture, which Mr Livingston was promulgating in this City for the purpose of influencing the public sentiment.—I now enclose a private Copy of “A Memoire par M. Du Ponceau, Jurisconsulte á Philadelphie,” together with a Response in Manuscript by Mr Thiery Editor of the Louisiana Courier.—I...
Your letter dated on the 16th. of August at Monticello, has been duly received. My official communications to the Secretary’s of State & War, will have informed you of the trial and conviction of four Alabama Indians charged with murder. The Court, the Attorney General & myself entertaining doubts how far the act of Congress, which points out the mode of trying Indians for offences committed...
Desirous to ascertain the real state of General Fayette’s Land warrants, I lately applied for information to the Register Mr. Van Pradelles, who has favored me with a Letter, of which, I now enclose a copy for your perusal.—I shall in a few Days, see Mr. Duplantier, & will urge his unremitted attention to the claims of General Fayette, until the locations are all made, and the Titles...
In consequence of my late visit to Opelousas, your Letters of the 9th. and 17th. July, did not reach me, until my return to this City which was on the evening of the 25th. Ultimo;—This circumstance, will I hope, plead my apology, for the delay, of my answer.— Your ideas, relative to the projected Canal between the Mississippi, and the Bayou St. John, have been privately and inofficially...
I have had the honor to receive your Letter of the 6th. of May, advising me of the additional restraints imposed by Congress on Coasting Vessels, with a view of preventing those evasions of the embargo Laws, which “the worthless part of Society,” have of late so successfully practiced.—Pending the interdiction of our Commercial Intercourse with foreign Nations, it is not probable that...
Edward Livingston sailed two days since in a vessel bound to Philadelphia , & from whence he proceeds to the City of Washington.—His object is (as reported) to have a personal conference with you upon several subjects private & political;—Among the former, the case of the Batture will be introduced;—among the latter, the acts of General Wilkinson during the winter of 1806, & of the Territorial...
I have the honor to enclose you an address from the Legislative Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans, and to subscribe myself with Sentiments of great respect & Esteem yo: mo: obt. servt DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Since my letter of the 5th. Instant advising you of the death of my esteemed friend J. W. Gurley, Mr. Robertson has consented to act as Attorney General, but with an intention of holding it no longer, that a suitable Character can be selected to fill the office permanently.— If the appointment of Register of the Land office, which is now vacant, should be confered on Mr. Robertson, I am...
Mr. John Ward Gurley, Attorney General for this Territory was on the 3rd. Instant killed in a Duel by Mr. Jones, the Gentleman who lately married Mrs. Mary Trist;—the dispute was of a private nature; there however is no doubt, but party politicks, promoted this unfortunate affair.—The death of this excellent Citizen is by me most sincerely regreted; I found him faithful to the Government and...
The late removal from the Batture in front of the Suburb St. Mary , of certain Persons, who had taken possession of the same subsequent to the third of March 1807, has been cause of great satisfaction to the Legislative Council & House of Representatives of the Territory of Orleans, whose thanks upon the occasion, to the President of the U. States, as expressed in a joint Resolution of the two...
My letters to the Secretaries of State and War have acquainted you with the state of things in this quarter.— The case of the Batture continues a source of uneasiness to the Louisianians, and unless Mr. Livingston is arrested in his operations, the Port of New Orleans may sustain injury.—This subject was lately before a Grand Jury, and their opinion conveyed in a Presentment, of which the...
At the request of Mr. Julian Poidrass and of Mr. Pierre Derminon, Judge of the Parish of Point Coupie, I have the honor to transmit you the enclosed Address , signed by a number of the respectable Inhabitants (Planters) of Point Coupie, and which I am persuaded conveys a sincere expression of their sentiments on the subject to which it relates. With sentiments of great respect I have the honor...
In a letter which I had the honor to address you from Natchez, I inclosed an extract from the Journal of the House of Representatives of this Territory, in which Messrs. Guerin & Levandeau were recommended as Councellors in the Room of James Mather Senior resigned.—I believe in the Letter alluded to, I took the liberty to recommend Mr. Levandeau, as best meriting your confidence;—But since my...
I now inclose you a copy of the correspondence which prece’ded the meeting between Mr. Clark & myself, & I sincerely hope you may find therein some apology for my conduct. I feel, as if I had been rashly imprudent;—But there are some considerations, which altho’ they do not justify me, yet (in my own opinion) they go far in extenuation.— From my earliest entry into public Life, I have been in...
I arrived at this place two Days since, & had intended to pass in this vicinity a Week or 10 Days;—But finding from the Northern papers the hostile aspect of our Affairs with Great Britain, and supposing it possible , that my presence in New-Orleans may be necessary, I shall, without delay, repair to my post. The late Act of British Aggression has excited in this Territory the same feeling...
Captain Cammack of the Marine Corps being order’ed to the City of Washington, I cannot avoid testifying to you my entire approbation of his Conduct while on this Station, and recommending him to your notice as an officer of merit and Talents;—He has for some time commanded the Marines at New-Orleans, & while his own Department has been uniformly correct, the most exact discipline has been...
I have received your letter of the 3rd. of May together with its inclosure.— Judge Sprigg departed from this City on the 23rd. of May for New York; he had not then resigned, & was undetermined, whether or not he should return as Judge; he was at one period extremely obnoxious to a party here, (of Americans) who can render any Man’s life disagreeable, & received of course a great share of their...
I continue confined to my room, and experience considerable pain—but the wound now suppurates profusely and my Surgeon gives me reason to believe that in 3 weeks I shall be enabled to walk—I fear however that the warmth of the weather will considerably retard my recovery. The business of my office will meet with no derangement by my present confinement—My private Secretary makes out under my...
My feelings have led me to an act which I fear may subject me to your censure. I was engaged on the 8th. instant in a Duel with Mr. Daniel Clark. The affair took place within the Florida line, and at the first fire, I received a ball which passed through my right thigh about ten inches below the hip, and made a considerable contusion in my left. Fortunately the bone was not injured, and altho’...
Mr. Clark has arrived, and every exertion is making to induce him, to take a violent part against the late proceedings here; A splendid Dinner has been given him, at which Edward Livingston presided as President, assisted by Mr Phil: Jones, and Mr. Ross a dismissed Sheriff.—Among the Guests were, the Judges of the Superior Court, and James Workman late Judge of the County of Orleans; The...
I have been honored with the receipt of your letter of the 21. of March, inclosing a copy of an act of Congress which authorizes the President to accept of such Company or Companies of Volunteers, not exceeding 30,000, as shall make a tender of service. The present state of things on the western side of the Mississippi, as far as I am advised, authorizes a hope that no difficulty will shortly...
When a Secretary for this Territory shall have been named, and entered on the duties of his office, I trust my temporary absence may be permitted;—I could wish to proceed direct to the U. States; but if Mrs. Claiborne’s present State of health, should continue, it would be my desire, to call either at Pensacola, or the Havannah.— If a Citizen of this Territory, should be appointed Secretary, I...
Since my letter of the 3d. instant, I am completely disappointed in my contemplated visit to the United States; I had made all the arrangements for my departure, and even taken my passage—when the unexpected summons for Mr. Graham, as a witness in Burr’s trial, rendered my continuance in the Territory indispensible. I regret the disappointment the more on account of the ill health of Mrs....
I now do myself the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Letter of the 3rd. of February last. Mr. Reibelt was illy fitted for the Management of Indians, & he might himself to be pleased with the Change. I have recently appointed Mr. Reibelt Parish Judge for the Parish of Avoyelle in this Territory; An Office which is respectable, & which will give him six or seven hundred Dollars per...
 The Bearer Mr. Hopkins was charged with public Despatches (of great importance) to the Secretary of State, and I trust will have safely delivered them, when he presents you with this Letter.—  Mr. Hopkins is desirous of obtaining a Commission in the Army of the U. States; He is a young Man of amiable disposition, correct habits, and good Judgment—I can venture, therefore to recommend him to...
My official Communications of yesterday to the Secretary of State, will acquaint you of the unpleasant aspect of Affairs in this quarter.— I persuade myself, that the danger from within will not prove as serious as is apprehended;—But whatever difficulties may arise, you may rely with Confidence, on my best exertions for the defence of my Country and Government. General Wilkinson is of...
Your friendly Letter of the 10th of July reached New-Orleans, during my late absence from that City, and was not received by me, until my return from Nachitoches. This circumstance will I hope, plead my apology for the delay of my answer. Your Letter to Mr. Reibelt has been delivered; that gentleman (with his family) is now in this City—I have not yet seen his Lady, but she is spoken of as a...
My official Letter of this date, to the Secretary at War, will inform you of the state of things in this quarter,—the reasons which occasioned my visit to this Post, and the part I have acted since my arrival. In addressing you therefore at this time, I have only to announce an event, which unpleasant as it may be, is nevertheless proper to acquaint you of.—Lieutenant Lewis of the Army, who I...
After a most disagreeable passage of near three days from the Mississippi, I arrived on yesterday morning at the County Town of Attackapas, much fatigued, very wet (for I was exposed for more than two hours to a heavy rain) and extremely unwell. I am now however at a most charming Situation, and in comfortable quarters; where I have the benefit of a pure Country air, and the most agreeable Sea...
I am now relieved from fever, but am so enfebled that I cannot complete the Journey, which I had contemplated;—Instead of visiting the Country on the Mississippi, as high as Natchez which was originally my intention, I shall pass over to Atakapas & Opelousas, where I shall breathe a healthy air, & where probably my health will soon be restored. The Route by water to Attakapas will be...
I am now in the County of Acadia and my Indisposition having assumed a more serious aspect, I shall avail myself of the hospitality of Mr. Barranger, and continue with him, until my fever (which is still slight) shall have left me. Mr. Barrangers farm is in a high state of cultivation, & his Improvements greatly surpass those of any other Citizen; his house is commodious; built of brick, and...
On this day at 7 O’clock, I sat out from Mr. Fortiers, and arrived at noon, at the house of Mr. Truards, the Judge of the County Court, for the County of German Coast. Judge Truard had invited to his house, the Justices of the Peace, and the other Civil officers of the County, & with whom I had the honor to dine.—The day passed pleasantly away, and I was pleased to find, that the American...