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From a conversation that I had with my brother last evening I find that the Letter I mentioned to you in confidence yesterday had been much misunderstood. I think it my duty to mention this fact that no injustice should be done to any party and that you may not think me rash and precipitate in my judgements— Present me to Mrs. Southard and return me the note franked which accompanies this /...
What! a letter from George I cried when your father put your last epistle in my hand yesterday afternoon? I was surprized for I thought that you ceased to wish to keep up any thing like friendly intercourse with your family and to feel that I was not altogether forgotten in the solitude of my chamber did occasion my heart to spring with joy. I am delighted to observe by the tone of your Letter...
I am very much afraid my Dear Thomas in consequence of your not writing to me according to your promise that you are not going on exactly as I wish I therefore write you not to preach but to entreat that you will be more attentive to your friends and answer their Letters— Your brother is gone to Rockville and his health is very much improved. Mary has grown quite fat and I never saw her look...
According to my promise I write to you again altho’ I do not feel quite sure that you will have time to read my Letters or that they will be more acceptable than the nonsensical scraps of poetry which I used to plague you with last Summer generally by the advice of Charles—but as that mania appears to be over I shall only write you short occasional Letters to let you know how we go on altho’...
Thank you my Dear George for your Letter and the Farce which arrived safely the day before yesterday and which I should have answered yesterday had I not been again confined to my chamber by a return of my Fever and many of the inflamatory symtoms which attended my illness in Boston—I was taken ill the day after I wrote to Hariet and went out too soon which occasioned a return of the Fever...
Having received a very elegant Lace Cap from the Ladies of the Lace school at Newport I write to request that you will do what you think proper while there as to the expression of thanks and the real admiration which the extreme beauty of the work deserves—as it is really equal to the finest European Lace—We leave Boston tomorrow morning and expect to be at New York on Friday night— Give my...
Your Note and packet came safely to me a few days since and I write a few lines merely to say that Mr. Adams has fixed the 4 of October to leave this place for home and that I do not think he will travel very rapidly—I hope Charles took the Letter out of the Post Office at Philadelphia and returned you the fifty Dollars I shall be uneasy until I hear I wish you would see and ask to write down...
I wrote you a very few lines yesterday my dear Charles, with a promise to write to you again immediately and more fully, but I fear that it will not be in my power to say all I wish to say, and for that you will thank your stars—In the first place let me beg you will not suffer Johnson to leave the house to sleep in his barn ; for the consequences might prove fatal to him—In the next let me...
I send this enclosure and add a few lines to state that I shall leave this place on Wednesday for Washington and hope to find Letters from you in New York—We shall go by the way of Hudson and Poughkeepsy— Yours Ever MHi : Adams Papers.
I intended writing to you yesterday but was prevented by a feverish indisposition which I believe was occasioned by the Water—I am much better to day, and hasten to inform you of our movements with which you have not been able to keep pace because they have been so variable— At Mrs. de Wints I was constantly sick during my stay, and appeared to be growing worse every hour—I found afterwards it...
I have been so very sick the last day or two it has been impossible for me to write you I am still very much indisposed but intend to proceed to Albany this Evening in the Steam Boat I believe my illness is occasioned by the keeness of the air which has reproduced most of the symptoms of the last Summers complaint The weather is however much warmer to day and I hope I shall soon be better in...
We have arrived safely here after a tolerably pleasant journey and a very pleasant visit at Borden Town although poor Mrs. Hopkinson was sick the greatest part of the time—I sent Charles on to secure me apartments and Mr Biddle accompanied me to this City in the Steam Boat from Washington—but our passage was boisterous and disagreeable— Charles King informed me last night that he had forwarded...
I was so much hurried when I wrote to you from New York that I am afraid you could scarcely read the scrawl—We left that City yesterday Morning and arrived here at about seven o clock last Evening—Mrs de Wint is much better than she has been and I find her looking very well— In consequence of Mr Kings having enclosed your Letters to me under cover to yourself at New York I have been much...
Having just received a letter from John I wish to know if you are desirous that I should come on before the affairs are settled as I have no interest in the concerns and as I am aware of the difficulties incident to the settlement I think it will be better for me to have nothing to do with it as it is impossible for me to steer clear of breakers however I may wish it I shall proceed to New...
I left my famous case and bottle containing the teeth in the Mahogany desk in my bed room—I will thank you to roll it up in paper and get your brother to seal it at each end to give to dr Huntt who will leave it for me at the City Hotel in New Your in the care of Mr Willerd the Bar Keeper— We are all here as stupid as possible wishing for you and already wanting to be at home—Give my love to...
Mrs. Adams presents her best respects to Mr Rush will be very much obliged to him to have the enclosed Letter delivered to Miss Hellen as soon as convenient after its reception. Mrs. A offers her best Compliments to Mrs. Rush— PHi : Gratz Collection.
From the earnestness of my last Letter I am much afraid that you may think as is often the case with my friends that it proceeded from ill temper—It was most assuredly not with such a motive or in such a disposition that it was written It sprung from the feeling of anxiety which the extreme difficulty of your situation produced and under the idea that Mr Quincy had relinquished his charge...
I yesterday sat down to answer your last Letter, and wrote two, neither of which I have sent, as the nature of my feelings were was such that their expression could not have been agreeable—Altho’ still under it unpleasant impressions, and knowing that neither my opinions or feelings will ought avail, I consider myself in duty bound to write, lest you should misinterpret my silence and deem it...
I did not write you yesterday because I was so much fatigued I was obliged to lie down as soon as I returned from the Capitol—The services were tolerable in the manner peculiar to both the Gentlemen who officiated, and were a happy specimen of the tame and the bombastic—Mr. Port’s prayer was handsomely made for you; and I think the Doctor had a leaning to the Sage of Quincy, which appeared...
You I presume have been so deeply plunged in business that the sudden arrival of your father must have caused you even more joy than common as it in a great measure delivers you from a very responsible and delicate situation—It is however singular that none of the family have written a single word since the death of your Grandfather and that we appear to be cut of from all communication— Every...
This day has brought me an invitation in form to attend at the Capitol tomorrow to witness the ceremonies and I am told that I must go—I shall therefore attend and all the members of the family will attend with me— Mr. Wirt declines the uniting the two characters in the Oration on the plea of not having known your father personally and his Patrick Henry having proved a failure from the same...
I yesterday wrote to you in answer to your Letter and as I suppose it will be agreeable to you to hear from the family frequently I write again to day— Last night there was a Town meeting called in honour of your fathers memory which was immesely crowded and at which Mr. Rush and Governor Barber distinguished themselves very handsomely—It was the wish of these Gentlemen to combine the events...
Ere I touch upon the melancholy subject which at present occupies your mind; allow me to offer the most sincere congratulations on the return of this day, which I had intended to celebrate in common with our family, and the Members of the administration, as a testimony of regard—The event which has so recently occurred, which altho’ painful to the individual feelings of all who had the...
Your Letter with that of Hariet Welsh was received by me a few hours after your father and John had left the City on their way to Boston—with the vain hope as it has proved of still being in time to receive the last blessing of your truly venerated Grandfather—Heaven has ordained otherwise and we must bow submissively to its all wise but inscrutable decrees and in gratitude raise our hearts in...
Mrs. Adams presents her best respects to Mr Southard as Mr Adams has with the greatest Kindness and liberality allowed J J. Boyd to hope that he may obtain a new warrant—Mrs. A. solicits Mr Southard to be equally indulgent to the follies of youth and for the sake of his unhappy papers to the Youth a New Warrant requesting at the same time that he may be sent immediately on board some Vessel if...
The Rival chiefs—who all their life Were striving to be even In death renew their mutual strife By struggling to reach heaven— Two Presidents’ in one short day Behold this People—weep Their fun’rals—none object to pay The last Expence—comes Cheap— MHi : Adams Papers.
Not a smile was seen—Nor a sound heard of joy Tho’ the day was to Gratitude vow’d The brightness of pleasure that ne’er knew alloy Had been dimm’d like the Sun by a cloud The day that a Nation first gave to the world And millions of Freemen—Now blest In its oft welcom’d Course—Saw no banner unfurl’d Save what proud exultation exprest With hearts high in hopes & with Gratitude fill’d The bright...
I am very glad my Dear George find by your Letter which is just received that you are better and if possible still more pleased to learn that you are likely to become very busy as I believe this is the only means to keep you in health— I regret very much not to see you as any journey to the North appears very doubtful this Summer and I am sorry to see your account of your Grandfathers state—It...
I am so uneasy about your state of health my dear George that I beg and entreat you to write me very particularly what is the matter with you—Is it the cough that still affects you if it is I entreat you to come on to me immediately here and stay one Month as it would certainly be advantageous to you to quit Boston at this season which is the worst in the year—I am very serious and shall be...
I enclose you some lines I wrote if you like you may publish them but do not say whose they are and sign them L. We are all well but I am to lazy to write Tell Mrs. Adams I think if she could find an opportunity to send Abby on here it would do her good and give me pleasure—I like your lines on Mrs Marston very much The prize excellent— Yours ever MHi : Adams Papers.