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You reproach me without a cause and I dare say you got your Letter the very day after you wrote—My time has however been very much occupied in sitting for a picture which is not a quarter finished and which it is probable will employ me the whole summer— You complain without reason of your Letter to me which was by no means bad tho’ it was odd but I do not know what you mean by saying you were...
I enclose you some lines which were written very hastily yesterday morning immediately after receiving the news of the death of poor Florida Pope after nine months of severe suffering—She was beautiful and a child of the fairest promise and there is some thing remarkable in the serenity and sweetness which closed her dying moments—She was calm collected and happy and distributed her little...
I received your Letter of the 7th yesterday Evening and was very happy to learn that you sustained the rigours of the Climate so well as I have involuntarily felt some apprehensions lest you should have suffered in consequence of your residence for so long a time in one so much warmer and milder—Poor Charles left us two days ago and I think with deeper regret even than usual—under an...
I enclose you some lines I wrote if you like you may publish them but do not say whose they are and sign them L. We are all well but I am to lazy to write Tell Mrs. Adams I think if she could find an opportunity to send Abby on here it would do her good and give me pleasure—I like your lines on Mrs Marston very much The prize excellent— Yours ever MHi : Adams Papers.
I am so much concerned my Dear George to learn from your last letter what a state of suffering you were in that I have been anxiously looking for a second letter to assure us of your recovery—We learn from the newspapers that the cold has been intense and I fear you do not take precautions to guard against its extreme severity— We are here in the midst of the busy bustling scene of a session...
The frequent and violent attacks of sickness which assail me my Dear George render me a wretched correspondent as the few days of comparative health which I enjoy are attended with a degree of debility which incapacitates me from any exertion of thought or rather of sedentary occupation without reproducing disagreeable sensations in my head and eyes.— We perceive with much delight an entire...
Your father wrote you a Letter yesterday in which he desires you to remain with your Grandfather to which I readily consented although with a pang which has absolutely made me sick such delight had I in the anticipation of your visit—My duties as it regards my children have always by some circumstance or other been rendered particularly painful and the sacrifices required have been almost...
As I am much afraid that I shall not accomplish the plan proposed in my last Letter to John you will have an opportunity to take a part at the last exhibition in preference to the one you mention in October as should your father be able to go on he will probably not stay more than a fort night and that might not suit the time fixed— Your Letters to me leave me so little to answer that I can...
I send you another sheet of the dialogue but it is so badly done I am quite ashamed of it. If it serves to excite your curiosity to read it in the original my object will be attained— We are all well and presume you are enjoying your self at Quincy with your Grandfather to whom I request you will remember me and be assured of the affection of your Mother & MHi : Adams Papers.
I was much pleased with the flow of good spirits which your last Letter indicated my Dear George more particularly as I considered it a strong evidence of returning health which I hope will now be substantially confirmed— That you will make a good Soldier if you aim at distinction in that line I have no doubt—but the Company into which you have entered is much more famed for dissipation than...
I do not recollect whether I answered your last Letter my memory not being remarkably good and keeping no account of dates but I rather think I did not in consequence of your father having undertaken it. I thank you for your attention in sending me the North American Review but your father has it at the Office now, so that it will not be worth your while to take that trouble any longer You...
I am very sorry to learn from your Letter to Charles my dear George that you had hurt your eye. I have certainly been suffering from sympathy for I never had such an inflamation in my eyes before in my life— We are again expecting the good General to take up his abode with us until his departure for France which I confess I shall hail with joy—I admire the old gentleman but no admiration can...
I am so uneasy about your state of health my dear George that I beg and entreat you to write me very particularly what is the matter with you—Is it the cough that still affects you if it is I entreat you to come on to me immediately here and stay one Month as it would certainly be advantageous to you to quit Boston at this season which is the worst in the year—I am very serious and shall be...
I yesterday received your melancholy Letter my Dear George informing me of the low state of Mrs. Welshs health and the painful anticipation of the family of her speedy demise—I always had a high opinion of Mrs. Welsh since I had the pleasure of first making her acquaintance and have always been very sensible of her kindness to myself and my children—The external polish of life acquired by...
As I presume you will have accomplished your journey ere this epistle arrives, and that you will have enjoyed the amicable greetings of your friends, and have in some measure fallen into your old habits, I may venture without the apprehension of recalling too tender ideas , to relate some of the circumstances which have occurred since you left us. Poor Colvert has lost one of his Children...
Your Letter of the 15 which I received yesterday has caused me the greatest alarm, and anxiety—Mr. Appleton when he returned from Cambridge told me he thought you looked pale, and thin but he believed it was only the effect of hard study—and some time since they wrote me from Quincy that in consequence of having been to Serenade Dr Kirkland on his return home you had taken a very bad cold...
Your Letter has remained unanswered some time in consequence of the illness of Mary which has been pretty severe tho’ short she is now convalscent and I hope will soon be well— I propose to leave Town for Frederick on Thursday next where I shall probably remain ten days after which I shall go to Baltimore to the Wedding of Susan Buchanan who is to be married on the 21st. we shall only stay one...
As it is possible my dear George that you may hear a rumour that your father was drowned I hasten to write you a few lines to assure you that he is safe although he did run some risk this morning in one of his swimming expeditions. In crossing the river this morning in a small crazy boat in company with Anthony the boat filled with water and upset when about half over but he fortunately had...
You I presume have been so deeply plunged in business that the sudden arrival of your father must have caused you even more joy than common as it in a great measure delivers you from a very responsible and delicate situation—It is however singular that none of the family have written a single word since the death of your Grandfather and that we appear to be cut of from all communication— Every...
Your two Letters have arrived safe and as we are all about as well as usual I shall appropriate this morning to writing you although our lives are so very quiet that it will be difficult to find a subject for your amusement— Your disappointment in not seeing Miss Peter must have been provoking enough. It will however be a Lesson and induce you to be always so far beautified as to be ready on...
I cannot suffer the day to pass my dear George without offering you the best wishes of your Mother on the return of the day which generally calls forth the good natured gratulations of our friends. May the ensuing year prove auspicious my beloved Son and ensure to you all the happiness you can desire pure unmixed and if possible without alloy.—As you are now the only one of the family who are...
I am very glad to learn from your last that Mrs. Thornton gave Mrs. Hamilton a party as I was really grieved to be obliged to leave her in such a dull place without having introduced her to some of the inhabitants She is a very fine Woman— The Letter you sent me from John was a merry one in his usual style but I cannot help feeling uneasy about Charles although happy to know he is at Quincy—...
When I left you my Dear George I was far from believing that an act of so little importance as the to the publick as the Endorsement of the Note for Mrs Moulton, should have been made a charge of so painful a nature against you Father; and brought so much shame upon the poor woman, who has been so cruelly and wantonly attacked in consequence of it—You have heard my statement concerning the...
Your Letter caused me some uneasiness perhaps more than was necessary in consequence of your first concealment which though done with the very best motive renders me fearful and suspicious that you still make less of your complaint than is necessary and by this means decieve yourself as well as me as to the care and attention which may be due to remove it—You are at a critical age and caution...
It is long since I wrote you, because I thought you so busily engaged that you would have no time to answer me, and because I believe my letters are rather an incumbrance than a pleasure— I thank you very much for the Poem which you sent me; it is like all the Poetry of Rogers very beautiful, but almost too highly polished, and if I may use the expression “smells too much of the lamp ” . You...
Your Grandfather has expressed so much satisfaction at your conduct during your visit to him this vacation, that I have great pleasure in giving you this information; as it must be a great relief to your mind to know , that he has forgiven your late conduct, which I am sorry to say Dr. Kirkland informed me, had been deficient both of affection and respect—I will not say any more on this...
It is so long since I heard from you I begin to find it difficult to account for your Silence—Have the Muses siezed upon your imagination? Or is it a touch of the belle passion which occupies your contemplation and makes you forget your Mother? either of these things might perhaps plead in excuse though I can only allow these to be momentary.— Your occupations are I know numerous but one...
Your Letter which I received yesterday gave mutual delight to all of us—It was exactly the style I have so often wished you to acquire easy playful and affectionate. This is the peculiar charm of familiar correspondence and worth all the studied phrases and elegant quotations that you could select from the first rate and best authors I suppose your appointment to be one of the standing...
We have arrived safe after a very tedious and on the whole disagreeable journey as the state of my health tho’ much improved still makes me a burthen to all I most love in the world and I fear there is little prospect of a change for the better—There is something in this great unsocial house which depresses my spirits beyond expression and makes it impossible for me to feel at home or to fancy...
Your Letters were both delivered to me yesterday the one by Dr Waterhouse and one by the Mail. I am very happy to observe that you have at last considered the object of a correspondence with your parents in its proper point of view and from henceforth I have no doubt you will be as attentive as we could possibly wish— You must naturally feel a little anxious concerning your Socrates and I hope...
Your father my dear George is so much occupied at this moment by the duties of his Office he cannot find time to answer you immediately and has commission’d me to be his proxy; a poor one I confess but I know acceptable. Your remarks on Mr. Colemans preaching and manner were interesting and I have no doubt correct and there are few things that tend more to the improvement of young people than...
As Congress have has adjourned I have literally not a word to write as we have nothing stirring here whatever either to interest or amuse—We are preparing to brave the Summer heats which bid fair to be as great though not so lengthened as usual the weather until yesterday having been unusually cool— John Randolph has again sailed for England as mad as ever and perhaps more malignant than ever...
According to my promise I write to you again altho’ I do not feel quite sure that you will have time to read my Letters or that they will be more acceptable than the nonsensical scraps of poetry which I used to plague you with last Summer generally by the advice of Charles—but as that mania appears to be over I shall only write you short occasional Letters to let you know how we go on altho’...
I write you my dear George, with a hope that this letter will not reach you. however as we have reports here of an Embargo, being to take place in America, early in the Season, I will not omit the opportunity which now offers, of assuring you of my tenderest affection, & solicitude, for your present and future welfare. Your Father, and myself, were very anxious to have both you, and your...
As you are determined not to write to your Mother or in any way to continue an intercourse always yielding her so much pleasure I shall only send you some very indifferent lines written to accompany the portrait now in the hands of Stewart— We are all well and only want your company to make us quite happy—Charles say’s you are the fortunate one of the family all the rest will be ruined— Accept...
It is an age since I have written to you my Dear George in consequence of having no subject on which to write that could afford you any pleasure and the times are such that it is hazardous to note even the events of the hour—On Sunday Morn Messrs. de Bresson and Laborie quarrelled about a piece of Omlet at the breakfast Table and adjourned to the race ground to settle their dispute with Swords...
Your ridiculous Letter as you call it was received yesterday and gave me great pleasure as at least it evinced all the discernment which I have ever given you credit for and proved your own worth by the discarding all those little petty jealousies and narrow feelings which are too apt to colour our opinions and to jaundice our opinions judgment—I have no particular partiality for either of my...
Mary is amusing me as usual in crying and whining because I suggest to her the necessity of some occupation She has written one page of your fathers Bible Letters and imagines that after such an immense exertion she must rest from her labours altogether. I will leave it to you to decide whether the Sabbath is to be literally understood as a day of total inactivity both of mind and body or...
My journal does most assuredly take a considerable portion of my time, my dear George, but that is not the reason of my not having written to you so often as you seem to have expected—I need not tell you who know me so well, that I am apt to fret under disappointments, and more particularly when they proceed from those whose interests are so deeply connected with my happiness, and that it...
We have been suffering so much from intense heat this Summer my dear George it has been impossible for me to attend to any thing like a regular correspondence and indeed our lives pass in such ar a routine of invariable sameness there is not wherewithal to furnish an anecdote for a Letter or a line to interest a reader— I yesterday received a melancholy Letter from Mr. Pope announcing the...
As I have not received a Letter from you I cannot pretend to answer one but I will write notwithstanding altho’ I have nothing to say no not even nonsence. a great art by the by I believe infinitely more difficult than to write mere prosy common sense.— To tell you how we go on here would be almost impossible. more especially in the great Councils of the Nation Whisper’d rumours however...
I am not sure my Dear George whether your last Letter was answered or not but at any rate you will not be much grieved at receiving another supposing that to have been the case as in that Letter you assure me that both my Letters and my advice are of consequence to you and afford you pleasure—Upon this ground then I shall continue writing as I have much more time than you have and send you a...
What have you been doing? where has your reason flown? while your poor Grandmother was yet warm in her grave; while your own mother whose all of happiness in this world depends upon the good conduct of her children was confined to her bed with a fever, what were you doing? following the foolish example of a set of wild and unruly young men whom you had not fortitude to condemn tho’ you must...
The melancholy situation of Judge Cranch’s family in consequence of the almost sudden death of Mrs. Norton and her Infant has filled us with grief and with the deepest sympathy for their suffering which is great in proportion to their dreadful calamity—At six o’clock this Eveng she and her Infant are to be buried—This is a trial almost too much for the known fortitude of the Judge whose...
In Joke while I was in Boston you one day said you would lend your Books to your Uncle Tom in New Orleans I then laughed at the idea but on arriving here he I found a Letter from him in which he requests such a loan from your father and as I know that in that way it would be difficult to procure them you would be rendering me a most essential service if you send a box of them to him which he...
Your Letter with that of Hariet Welsh was received by me a few hours after your father and John had left the City on their way to Boston—with the vain hope as it has proved of still being in time to receive the last blessing of your truly venerated Grandfather—Heaven has ordained otherwise and we must bow submissively to its all wise but inscrutable decrees and in gratitude raise our hearts in...
We suffer too much from the heat my Dear George not to make allowance for your purisse but I am very glad to see that at least it does not affect your spirits or that the lovely brides (for brides you know must always be lovely old or young) have not produced a marrying mania and set you to seek too hartily for that which neither time nor care can ensure in its perfection—In the selection you...
I wrote you a hurried Letter the other day my dear George in answer to your last as I was fearful you might purchase me another Shawl. As I am now much better than I was I will enter more fully into my winter plans and of our present life. As yet we have but little company excepting occasional morning visits—I have been papering and painting one or two of my rooms and that with the bad state...
Although my Dear George I fear that my last Letter was not very palatable to your high spirit being in better health and spirits than I have been for sometime I must seize the opportunity of writing least they should again sink and I should be compelled by dire necessity to abandon once more an occupation more delightful to my heart than all the pleasures this gay world can offer that of free...
As you know me to be an Amateur of the horrible incidents of human Tragedy if my Dear George you will not be surprized at receiving some lines written by me on a melancholy event which recently took place in the City—The Actors were in a middling class of society and the circumstance has died away like the poor miserable victims of passion with out eliciting a remark excepting from the levity...