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By some accident my letter was too late for the last Post I therefore only send you this letter of Charles’s with assurances of our mutual affection— Dear Papa St Petersburg Novbr: 18th: 1814 I am quite a Soldier since Mrs: Betancourt made me a present of a Gun, and I exercise every day. Mama has got a new Servant who has been a Solider, and he drills me; it is a real gun, and George Krehmer...
The American Minister and Mrs Adams will do themselves the honour of attending upon her Majesty, at the Queen’s House on Monday the 12th of August, at 9 o clock, conformally to the invitation which by her Majesty’s Command they have received from Mr Disbrowe. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Mr et Madame Adams infiniment sensibles à toutes les attentions obligeantes, dont Monsieur le Comte et Madame la Comtesse de Lieven les ont honorés, pendant leur Séjour en Angleterre, et particulièrement a l’invitation aussi flatteuse que cordiale qu’ils viennent d’en recevoir de nommer un jour pour diner chéz eux, avant leur prochain départ, profitent de cette permission pour leur proposer...
Mr. and Mrs. Adams request the Honor of Mr Rush’s Company at Dinner on Tuesday the 2 of August at 5 o’Clock The Favor of an Answer is requested. NjP : Papers of Richard Rush.
As the account I gave you the day before yesterday may occasion you some anxiety on my wife’s account, it gives me the most cordial pleasure now to inform you that she is as well as under the Circumstances could possibly be expected, and the infant remarkably hearty and Strong—My Sister Smith came in from Quincy the morning of the child’s birth and has been with Mrs: Adams constantly since. I...
Mr. and Mrs. Adams request the Honor of Mr Garnetts Company at Dinner on the 12th of December at ———— o’Clock The Favor of an Answer is requested. DLC : John Adams Papers.
Mr & mrs Adams return their Compliments to Col. Stapleton with many thanks for his obliging offer to take their commands for the United States—They avail themselves of his kindness to request him to take charge of the inclosed letter & pray him to accept the assurance of their best wishes that he may have a pleasant & prosperous passage— MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Mr. and Mrs. Adams request the Honor of Capt Barnard’s Company at Dinner on Monday the 4h of January at 5 o’Clock The Favor of an Answer is requested. MHi : Adams Papers.
Know all men by these presents, that I John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, now abiding at Washington in the District of Columbia, for an in consideration of the sum of three hundred dollars paid me by Leonard Bowker of Salem in the County of Orleans and State of Vermont, the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, have given, granted, and do...
Will Mr Coleman do Mr and Mrs Adams the favour of coming and dining with them, this day at five O’Clock—of if engaged this day, to-morrow? NNGL .
I enclose you some lines which were written very hastily yesterday morning immediately after receiving the news of the death of poor Florida Pope after nine months of severe suffering—She was beautiful and a child of the fairest promise and there is some thing remarkable in the serenity and sweetness which closed her dying moments—She was calm collected and happy and distributed her little...
Harriet Welsh writes me that George and you intend to visit Mrs. de Wint during the vacation and that if your father grants you permission you intend to go on to Niagara—I had made a partial engagement to accompany Mr. & Mrs. de Wint to Niagara this fall but I do not feel quite sure that I shall be able to accomplish this purpose as your father tho’ he says I may go always appears to have...
Mrs Adams requests the favor of an order from Mr Hamilton to receive from the Custom House a small Packet containing Childrens caps brought by Mr Oswald from Paris. UK-KeNA : Foreign Office.
I received your Letter of the 7th yesterday Evening and was very happy to learn that you sustained the rigours of the Climate so well as I have involuntarily felt some apprehensions lest you should have suffered in consequence of your residence for so long a time in one so much warmer and milder—Poor Charles left us two days ago and I think with deeper regret even than usual—under an...
I enclose the Letter just received I cannot guess why it was written to me— MHi : Adams Papers.
I cannot imagine my Dear John what can be the reason of your not writing to me. You used to be a very regular correspondent, but I suppose the Ladies have such demands on your time you have none to bestow on your poor Mother. We are very happy to learn from Mr Pomeroy, that your Grandfather is so entirely recovered he tells us the old Gentleman has not looked so well this two years as he does...
I forgot when I closed my last to answer your question concerning my brothers baggage—He wishes it to be put into some safe place until it can be reshiped to New Orleans; to which place he intends returning as soon as his health is reestablished, unless he could exchange the situation he holds there for something which would be an occupation, one an equivalent in point of pecuniary matters...
Another Letter was yesterday brought me but it gave me no hopes of your return and I dare not flatter myself yet that you will obtain any answer more decisive to this last effort, than they have hitherto given upon any point. as I wrote you once before notwithstanding I am so anxious to see him you I could almost wish you might be detained untill the coming Spring, so fearful am I that this...
It is a long time since I wrote you as I have again been very sick and utterly unable to put pen to paper—You may therefore readily imagine that I have nothing to write about any more than yourself as I have had nothing whatever to do with the great world for some time who are kind enough to believe me sick in consequence of the Presidential question—I will acknowledge that it is of a nature...
Your Letter my caused me a mixture of feelings some pleasing some painful the latter because there is an evidence of a temper little calculated to promote the success of your wishes and evincing a disposition to rebel against your fathers order which must end unhappily to yourself—Be assured my dear Son that industry obedience and application will produce the best effects and that while you...
I am all impatience to hear from you, my beloved friend, and cannot concieve the reason, of your not having written from New York, according to your promise. there are some reports about that have occasioned me some much uneasiness and I wish very much to learn, that our friends there are all well , not a line having been recieved here. I have sent your Bank book, &c, as you desired, and have...
Regularity and method are so essential to the acquisition of real knowledge that the little annoyance of the Bell is a trifle to the good consequences which its sound produces when it reminds you that certain duties are to be performed at certain times—The human mind requires an incessant spur or stimulus to invigorate its action or more properly speaking to force it into certain channels...
I was so much occupied during my stop at Borden Town I could not answer your Letter therefore busy myself here having nothing to do with all the nonsense I can think of for pastime. You can easily conceive, the dreariness of my situation travelling alone with your father who though more of a than I can recollect since the earliest period of our marriage is still too much of a Statesman to be...
July 22 Major and Mrs. Jackson Mr Ewing and Mr. N. Biddle called on us, all of them talking of nothing but your rejoinder, which is thought even better of than the remarks—They told me to tell you that there was no dissenting voice on the subject, and Mr. R. was universally condemned—He is quite Kilt so dont disturb him, but let him get what rest he can under such circumstances—George Harrison...
I write you a few lines my dear John in answer to yours which I received last night merely to say we are all well and your Grandfather better but we are so immerced in dinners and partys that my head is perfectly turned— Give my love to Johnson (Hellen), and tell him not to grieve—for I am glad the connection has failed as there is something in the conduct of all parties not altogether...
I enclose you some lines I wrote if you like you may publish them but do not say whose they are and sign them L. We are all well but I am to lazy to write Tell Mrs. Adams I think if she could find an opportunity to send Abby on here it would do her good and give me pleasure—I like your lines on Mrs Marston very much The prize excellent— Yours ever MHi : Adams Papers.
Being very well I hasten to write you and although you disclaim all merit in a certain transaction still to repeat my approbation of a conduct which does you so much honour and which I hope (although you must not expect) will be rewarded by the improvement and merit of its object—Should this not happen do not suffer the disappointment to mortify or wound your feelings or to damp any future...
I enclose bills to the amount of five & forty Dollars in payment of the account of Messrs. Benson & Co. and will be obliged by your taking a receipt and returning it by the Post whenever it may be convenient. This account would long since have been settled had it not been delayed without our knowledge by my husbands Steward for which I beg your excuse— Mr. Adams and myself offer our best...
I was so fortunate as to recieve your No 25 on Wednesday which was the day in course but as it was the first time I mention it as something extraordinary I shall certainly be very cautious as you request about your letters— I cannot help smiling at your affected difficulty about filling a sheet of Paper and were it possible that a compliment from your wife could have any value I should almost...
I recieved your letter my dear Child only a few days since and am charmed to find that George and you are such good boys I am sure you are much obliged to Cousin Abby for your letters. and I you will soon learn to write them yourself I hope as they will afford me double pleasure George is now near ten years old and is I am sure too much of a man to play truant any more and I am sure you never...
We have proceeded thus far on our journey as well and with as much pleasure as we could possibly have expected and the day I have passed at this place will ever be remember’d by me with gratitude and pleasure from the very polite and kind attention of the Governor and his Lady to whom Mr Harris gave me letters of recommendation they are a charming couple exact suited to please me as they are...
I am so much concerned my Dear George to learn from your last letter what a state of suffering you were in that I have been anxiously looking for a second letter to assure us of your recovery—We learn from the newspapers that the cold has been intense and I fear you do not take precautions to guard against its extreme severity— We are here in the midst of the busy bustling scene of a session...
Decbr. 3d Did not attend at Church Mr Ryland was to preach and his last sermon was such a strange medley of scraps and ends miserably put together I did not feel tempted to go again—remained at home all day. 4th The day was stormy and disagreeable—In the Eveng went into George Town to fetch Fanny Johnson. The Stage had not arrived and we drove to Mrs. Frye’s where we took Tea—She mentioned...
19 Sept My last I believe closed on this day; I will therefore continue the account of our proceedings—While we were at Table the Count and his daughter paid us a visit and left Cards—and in the Evening we received an invitation to a water party at four o’clock tomorrow afternoon; and to spend the Evening which we graciously accepted. After which we strolled to the burying ground, where Miss...
The frequent and violent attacks of sickness which assail me my Dear George render me a wretched correspondent as the few days of comparative health which I enjoy are attended with a degree of debility which incapacitates me from any exertion of thought or rather of sedentary occupation without reproducing disagreeable sensations in my head and eyes.— We perceive with much delight an entire...
We have been under the necessity of delaying our journey a few days on account of the marriage of Harriet which took place on thursday evening at eight o’clock since which I have been so much engaged with company and preparations for my departure It has not been in my power to write you untill this morning—We propose leaving this place on Tuesday morning and shall probably reach Quincy in...
I enclose two letters my be loved friend which I request you will give to Adelaide I have not recieved your promissed letter I will not say that I anticipate much pleasure from its perusal as I think it is an answer to a letter I wrote you which has caused me much regret still to hear from you at all affords me so much real satisfaction. I anxiously await its arrival firmly convinced that you...
My last letter mentioned some good news which I had heard from America I thank God this has been confirm’d and a great deal beside which I had neither thought’s or hopes of I was in expation of your last Letter’s being filled with the particulars but the date from London was precisely the same and you could not recieve it untill two days later your next will however contain all this news and...
Your father wrote you a Letter yesterday in which he desires you to remain with your Grandfather to which I readily consented although with a pang which has absolutely made me sick such delight had I in the anticipation of your visit—My duties as it regards my children have always by some circumstance or other been rendered particularly painful and the sacrifices required have been almost...
My health continues to mend rappidly and the prospect of soon rejoining you and my little darlings supports my spirits and enables me to bear the dreadful stroke that has befallen me with more fortitude than otherwise I fear I should have done— I can safely assure you that this misfortune was not caused by any imprudence on my part Dr. Weems is satisfied that the Child had been subject to...
Ere I touch upon the melancholy subject which at present occupies your mind; allow me to offer the most sincere congratulations on the return of this day, which I had intended to celebrate in common with our family, and the Members of the administration, as a testimony of regard—The event which has so recently occurred, which altho’ painful to the individual feelings of all who had the...
We have accomplished our journey thus far as well as I anticipated but my brother was so ill this morning I was fearful we should be obliged to remain at Baltimore for some days. As however he is better this Eveng he has determined to go on in the Stage and reach Philadelphia tomorrow morning—I shall therefore send the Carriage round to join us there— Our Stage party consists of Mr Pratt of P....
I recieved your last very kind letter two days since and return you many thanks for your verses the idea is extremely beautiful and I should be much delighted to see it dressed in some other form by you I do not admire the versification at present whatever you do write must be more grateful to me than the best piece that ever was penned— I followed the multitude today and went to pay my...
I found your note this morning on my plate when I enterred the breakfast room and hasten to offer you my congratulations on the birth of your Little Grandson for whose happiness and welfare in this world of trouble I most sincerely pray may he prove a joy and blessing to his Parents. Mr. Adams has been afflicted with an inflamation in his eyes which terminated in an Abcess in the under-lid of...
Your two last No 12 & 13 were delivered to me at the same time I presume the first had been detained at the Post Office and closely inspected and even the second was also examined but not detain’d As to Day was our Wedding day and the day on which the Emperor’s return to us Capital was celebrated I went to the Te Deum and spent my morning in praying for the success of your Mission. when I...
As I am much afraid that I shall not accomplish the plan proposed in my last Letter to John you will have an opportunity to take a part at the last exhibition in preference to the one you mention in October as should your father be able to go on he will probably not stay more than a fort night and that might not suit the time fixed— Your Letters to me leave me so little to answer that I can...
Yesterday brought me your Letter of the 7th which I was sorry announced a mishap which gave me some concern—I recommend you for the future on a rainy day to put your Seals in your pocket before you set out to school as a sure guard against such accidents— If your father will permit me I will lend you the American Revolution with pleasure as I am sure you will read it carefully and not injure...
Your Letter my dear John gave us great uneasiness on your Grandfathers account and we feel very anxious lest the violence of the shock should have injured his health. We hope to hear from you frequently and that your Letters may be welcomed as harbingers of good instead of ill news for the future— I propose to leave this City on the 14 as your father wishes me to travel in the Carriage I shall...
August 17 Mr. Cook called to inform me he intended to return to Washington tomorrow; and while he was sitting with me the Doctor again went through the operation on my brother again which was as in the former case attended with complete success. For two hours after he suffered great anguish, but I gave him a small dose of laudanum which soothed the irritation of his nerves; and he was much...
As Mr. & Mrs. Johnson intend leaving us this evening I write you a few lines to assure you of our health and that of the charming family with whom we now are. Caroline and her children are quite well and happy and gave us the cheering welcome of an old and affectionate friend— The situation of Mrs. de Wirts house is beautiful but you have heard too much of it to need any description from me....