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I have deferred answering your Letter my Dear George in the hope of obtaining the Reviews you mention but have not been able to procure them—Of Mr. Channings I have not much to say excepting that the stile is like that of a gentle Turtle dove wooing with melay. but eloquently persuasive accent those who differ with him in religious opinions; but without reasoning so as to produce conviction—It...
As I have not received a Letter from you I cannot pretend to answer one but I will write notwithstanding altho’ I have nothing to say no not even nonsence. a great art by the by I believe infinitely more difficult than to write mere prosy common sense.— To tell you how we go on here would be almost impossible. more especially in the great Councils of the Nation Whisper’d rumours however...
Why you should have thought that I was offended my dear George I cannot imagine as I have never had an idea of the kind but I believe that the state of my health and the constant irritation of the nervous system has so soured my temper I am now always crass and unpleasant to myself and to everybody else.—Mr. Quincy has left us after a short visit in which we endeavoured to obtain his company...
Your letter has this moment been put into my hand and as a proof of how happy it makes me to hear from you I hasten to answer it immediately— Shut up as I now am in this great house, I have few opportunities of mixing with society and my health is so bad I almost lose the relish for parties which once gave a zeal to the enjoyment. I was however at the Ball on the 22d which was very handsome...
It is some time my dear George since I wrote but much sickness and trouble have kept my mind in a state of anxiety which has prevented my answering your last which was most kind and affectionate—Our pore coachman John Cook was found dead in his bed last week and left us a prey to surmizes and conjectures as to the causes of his decease which can never be satisfied— I had got thus far when your...
I cannot suffer the day to pass my dear George without offering you the best wishes of your Mother on the return of the day which generally calls forth the good natured gratulations of our friends. May the ensuing year prove auspicious my beloved Son and ensure to you all the happiness you can desire pure unmixed and if possible without alloy.—As you are now the only one of the family who are...
I am so much concerned my Dear George to learn from your last letter what a state of suffering you were in that I have been anxiously looking for a second letter to assure us of your recovery—We learn from the newspapers that the cold has been intense and I fear you do not take precautions to guard against its extreme severity— We are here in the midst of the busy bustling scene of a session...
As you are determined not to write to your Mother or in any way to continue an intercourse always yielding her so much pleasure I shall only send you some very indifferent lines written to accompany the portrait now in the hands of Stewart— We are all well and only want your company to make us quite happy—Charles say’s you are the fortunate one of the family all the rest will be ruined— Accept...
We have arrived safe after a very tedious and on the whole disagreeable journey as the state of my health tho’ much improved still makes me a burthen to all I most love in the world and I fear there is little prospect of a change for the better—There is something in this great unsocial house which depresses my spirits beyond expression and makes it impossible for me to feel at home or to fancy...
In the course of my ride from New Brunswick yesterday my Dear George the wish you expressed for something like a translation or imitation of the Lines I wrote in french and I dictated to Elizabeth while she wrote the very indifferent lines which follow—One verse is added and I beg you to alter or correct as you please—I know they are not good but they in a great degree convey the ideas...
You will be quite worn out my dear George with my would be poetic effusions; but as I told you in my last I know that the événemens de tout les jours are so well and so constantly sent to you by your brother, I have nothing left but to send you the singular scraps of my folly elicited occasionally by unlooked for circumstances On the departure of General Lafayette from our own house I felt...
It is a very long time my dear venerated father since I have written to you; but the events of yesterday were altogether so interesting I cannot refrain from giving you an account of them— The genl in his travels through this Country has been so much the publick idol, and the devotion of the people has been continued with so much fervour until the last moment of his residence among us, he...
As you know me to be an Amateur of the horrible incidents of human Tragedy if my Dear George you will not be surprized at receiving some lines written by me on a melancholy event which recently took place in the City—The Actors were in a middling class of society and the circumstance has died away like the poor miserable victims of passion with out eliciting a remark excepting from the levity...
I am very sorry to learn from your Letter to Charles my dear George that you had hurt your eye. I have certainly been suffering from sympathy for I never had such an inflamation in my eyes before in my life— We are again expecting the good General to take up his abode with us until his departure for France which I confess I shall hail with joy—I admire the old gentleman but no admiration can...
We suffer too much from the heat my Dear George not to make allowance for your purisse but I am very glad to see that at least it does not affect your spirits or that the lovely brides (for brides you know must always be lovely old or young) have not produced a marrying mania and set you to seek too hartily for that which neither time nor care can ensure in its perfection—In the selection you...
I enclose you some lines which were written very hastily yesterday morning immediately after receiving the news of the death of poor Florida Pope after nine months of severe suffering—She was beautiful and a child of the fairest promise and there is some thing remarkable in the serenity and sweetness which closed her dying moments—She was calm collected and happy and distributed her little...
Mr. and Mrs. Adams request the Honor of Mr Rush’s Company at Dinner on Tuesday the 2 of August at 5 o’Clock The Favor of an Answer is requested. NjP : Papers of Richard Rush.
Your Letter is this moment put into my hands my beloved Son, and I hasten to answer it, apologizing at the same time for a neglect which has been caused entirely by the dull sameness of our lives, and the utter impossibility of finding any subject on which to write. I guessed what your silence meant on the subject of my Letter , for I had like yourself cried out, what a falling off is here!...
We have been suffering so much from intense heat this Summer my dear George it has been impossible for me to attend to any thing like a regular correspondence and indeed our lives pass in such ar a routine of invariable sameness there is not wherewithal to furnish an anecdote for a Letter or a line to interest a reader— I yesterday received a melancholy Letter from Mr. Pope announcing the...
As I am afraid you will hardly recieve my Letter in time I hasten to tell you that if you have no part assigned to you you must come on directly so as to be here on Wednesday Week when Genl La Fayette is to pay us a visit and I want you to assist me in doing the honours of the House— Give my love to all and tell George to send the Silk by you to your affectionate Mother MHi : Adams Papers.
Know all men by these presents, that I John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, now abiding at Washington in the District of Columbia, for an in consideration of the sum of three hundred dollars paid me by Leonard Bowker of Salem in the County of Orleans and State of Vermont, the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, have given, granted, and do...
I was very happy to hear from you my dear George as I felt anxious on account of the great heat knowing you would be exposed to all the ferver of an intense Sun and am very glad to find that you have not suffered from it— You say so little concerning the brilliant display of which we are told so much in the papers, that I suppose you were in too enthusiastic admir a state of admiration to find...
Your Sister informs me my dear Thomas that you are preparing to enter College in the Month of August next and the information give me so much pleasure I write to tell you how much I am gratified as it convinces me that you have been industrious and laudably ambitious to perfect your advantages in the completion of your education. There is but little passing among us that can afford topics of...
As it is possible my dear George that you may hear a rumour that your father was drowned I hasten to write you a few lines to assure you that he is safe although he did run some risk this morning in one of his swimming expeditions. In crossing the river this morning in a small crazy boat in company with Anthony the boat filled with water and upset when about half over but he fortunately had...
I yesterday received your melancholy Letter my Dear George informing me of the low state of Mrs. Welshs health and the painful anticipation of the family of her speedy demise—I always had a high opinion of Mrs. Welsh since I had the pleasure of first making her acquaintance and have always been very sensible of her kindness to myself and my children—The external polish of life acquired by...
I was much pleased with the flow of good spirits which your last Letter indicated my Dear George more particularly as I considered it a strong evidence of returning health which I hope will now be substantially confirmed— That you will make a good Soldier if you aim at distinction in that line I have no doubt—but the Company into which you have entered is much more famed for dissipation than...
The frequent and violent attacks of sickness which assail me my Dear George render me a wretched correspondent as the few days of comparative health which I enjoy are attended with a degree of debility which incapacitates me from any exertion of thought or rather of sedentary occupation without reproducing disagreeable sensations in my head and eyes.— We perceive with much delight an entire...
The perpetual trouble and occupation we have found in getting into our new residence has prevented my writing to you my dear Charles and even now I have no subject on which to occupy your attention— The situation in which we found the House made it necessary to furnish almost entirely anew a large portion of the apartments and the whole time of John and my self has been engrossed in...
As I know you will be very anxious to hear from me my Dear George I hasten to write merely to inform you that my health though still very weak is much better and I am able to ride out— No change has yet taken place in our establishment and we have all the trouble of our removal still in anticipation but my chief concern is the disposal of our house which I fear will be attended with much...
I have been prevented from writing to you a long time my dear Tom first in consequence of ill health and since because I thought it would be better to await your return to College than to address to Exeter where I hope you have been happy among your respectable old friends— It gives me great pleasure to learn from Mary that you have become more satisfied with your situation and now I have only...