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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Willink, Wilhem & Jan (business)"
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I have recieved the Letter which You did me the honor to write me on the 11th, of this Month in which You agree to accept the Terms of four and one quarter per Cent for the Remedium and other Charges. To this I answer, that I understand your meaning to be, to accept of 4 1/4 per Cent for recieving and paying the Money at first, for re­ cieving and paying off the annual Interest, and for...
Your Favour of the Sixteenth instant I received last night by Mr Fynje. In order to give as general Satisfaction As may be and in order to bring this Business to a Conclusion, I shall agree to the Terms proposed in it, with the following Explanation and alteration, which are indespensibly necessary. The Explanation is this, that my “Promise to open no other Loan at any other House or Houses in...
I have just received your Favour of the Seventeenth of May, in answer to mine of the Same day by Mr Fynje and it is with great Pleasure that I perceive, We are how agreed upon the Terms. I hope the Loan, will, in Consequence of this Agreement by opened without Loss of Time, and I wish you all the Success and Pleasure in the Prosecution of the Business that you can possibly wish your Selves. I...
I have recd the Letters from Messrs Van Staphorst of the 22 with the Prospectus, and to day that of Messrs Willink is come to hand. I am glad the Prospectus is published, and wish the Bonds to be prepared as soon as possible and Sent to me to Sign. They shall not wait long for my Signature. My Friend, Mr Thaxter, is so ill of a Fever that I cannot leave him, and therefore cannot come to...
I must beg the Favour of you, to call on Send to Mr De Neufville, and pay him, an Account he has against the United States, for Services done under my Direction amounting to better than 2000 Guilders, and take his Receipt upon the Account and charge it in your Books to the United States of America. He has also a Small an Account against me in my private Capacity, to which should be added the...
There is a Person, by the Name of Joseph Stevens in Amsterdam, a Native of America, who has attended me, through many a dangerous Voyage and painful Journey; but who has fallen in Love with and married a young Woman in Amsterdam, which obliged him to leave my service. I wish well to the Man, and should be glad to assist him if it were in my Power, in getting a Living. But I knew of no better...
I inclose you a Letter to Messrs Gerbrand Ravekes, and J. G. Thin Van Keulen, and request you to pay them, the Sum of f1281:12s, and take up the Lease, and a Receipt in full for half a years Rent in Arrear, and for the Loss and Expences upon the present year, arrising from their Letting the House to another with my Consent. This Sum you will please to charge to the United States of America. I...
This Morning I recd your favour of the Eighth but I am not able to inform you, what is the Amount of the Bills drawn upon Mr Lau­ rens which are not yet arrived. I have never been exactly informed myself. They cannot I think amount to more than 100000 one two hundred Thousand Guilders. I hope not half that sum, but cannot say positively. I am obliged to you for the Trouble you have taken to...
I have been informed, that a Motion has been made in the Regency of Amsterdam, that a Sum should be subscribed in Behalf of the City to a Loan which is to be opened for the State of Mary land. I wish well to the state of Maryland and wish for the Persperity of her Loan: but I am apprehensive that you and I shall be all censured by Congress, if this Motion takes Place and We neglect to apply...
Since my Letter of the Eighth I have, recd a Letter from Mrs Vanstaphorsts and have conversed with one of those Gentlemen, and am after further Reflection, of opinion that the Loan of Mary land even if the Regency of Amsterdam Should Subscribe to it, will not injure the Loan of the United States and therefore, I shall make no opposition or objection to it. As to your applying publickly or...
I have recd your two Letters for which I am obliged to you. This is an affair of Some Delicacy and Difficulty, but all Things considered I have concluded not to make any opposition to the Application of Messrs Van Staphorsts. Upon the whole, I hope the United States will be benefited rather than injured as you have found in my Letter to the society of the 10th. I would not advise an...
The Bearer of this is Mr. Charles Storer, a young Gentleman of Boston, whom I beg leave to recommend to your Acquaintance. I have sent to your Address to day a Trunk, which I beg the favor of You to fill up with such Things as Mr Storer shall mention to You, and send it well covered with a tarred Canvass to Mrs. Adams of Braintree to the Care of Isaac Smith Esqr. of Boston. Send it, if You...
In Answer to the Question contained in your Favor of yesterday, I would observe, that I must depend upon Post-Horses and Postilions on the Road, and shall have Occasion for the Amsterdam Coachman and Horses only as far as Utrecht. But You will have the Goodness to desire the Coachmaster at Amsterdam to write to some Person in Utrecht to procure me a fresh supply of Horses when I shall arrive...
I have rec d your letters of 21. and 28 of October, last night. As to your furnishing Money to Mr Dumas.— Some Repairs have been done to the House of the United States at the Hague; Mr Dumas will transmit you all the Accounts of the House wrights, Masons, Glaziers, Painters &c with Receipts upon them. These you will be pleased to pay, and charge them in the Books of the Society, to the United...
I have this day received by Captain Barney in a Short Passage from Philadelphia, the Ratifications of our Contracts, which are all here inclosed ten in Number, together with two Letters for you and one Packet and one Letter for Mr Dumas, which I pray you to transmit him with my Respects. Let me beg of you, Gentlemen to encourage and promote our Loan by all fair and reasonable Means, and...
Great Britain has acknowledged the Independence of America. The King has given a Commission under the Great Seal, to M r. Oswald to treat with the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America. I mention this to You in Confidence for your Information, but You must not mention me as your Authority, nor make any Use of this Letter but for your own Government. There are prudential...
Your Favour of 15 th. Instant is this moment come to Hand. M r Le Couteulx & M r Grand called upon me last Evening upon the Same subject.— I told them both what I now repeat to you “That I have no Right, Power or Authority, whatsoever to give any orders, Directions or Advice in this Matter, M r Morris alone, having the Authority of Congress to dispose of the Money.”— But if my opinion as a Man...
The Preliminaries, to be inserted, in the definitive Treaty of Peace, when the other belligerent Powers shall be ready, were yesterday signed & sealed by the Minister Plenipotentiary of his Britannic Majesty on the one part, & the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States on the other. This Fact I communicate to You in Confidence, that You may make the best Use of it You can, for the...
Your several Letters I have rec d. — The protested Bill ought to be accepted for the Honor of the Drawer. Altho’ I have no Authority over the Money in your Hands as You know, yet considering the Circumstances, I should advise You to remit M r. Grand four hundred thousands of french Livres Tournois, besides the four hundred thousands already remitted, for the Interest of the Loan in Holland. It...
I rec d last night yours of Jany 30, and I had before rec d that with my Account, I have rec d of M r Van den Yver, frees & Comp. four hundred Louis D’ors at two different Times as they have advised you, You may charge all these Sums to the United states as Moneys paid to me, towards my Salary.— But I shall soon receive of him or you a larger sum, viz 1250 £ sterling, but whether here or at...
I have rec d your Favour of the 17 th. and the former Letters mentioned in it. I approve of your Paying to Mess s John De Neufville & son the seven Coupons, which you will please to charge to the United States. I Should think it best for the Holders of those Seven Obligations, to deliver them to you and take new ones from you to Save themselves as well as Mess s Deneufvilles Trouble in future....
I have rec d. the favor of your’s of the 3 d. — There is nobody in Europe authorized to give American Papers to any Vessels.— We have given Passports to British Vessels in pursuance of the Articles of the Peace, but British Vessels alone wanted such Protection. Dutch Vessels have no need of them. Please to pay off the Accounts which you transmit me, in this Letter of the 3 d , take Receipts...
I have signed & M r Grand will this day forward, the two thousand & three Obligations you sent me, which compleats the 5003. Inclosed is a Copy of M r. Morris’s Letter to you of 30. of April 1783, & M r. Grand’s original Letter to me of this day’s date. The Circumstances are such as to make it necessary you should comply with M r. Morris’s Orders as soon as possible by furnishing to M r. Grand...
As I am about Settling my Accounts with M r Barclay who is impowered by Congress to settle them, I must beg the favour of you, Gentlemen, to Send me, an exact Account, in detail of every order I have drawn upon you, and of every Sum of Money you have paid upon my order, from the Beginning, and of all the Money I have received of you, jointly or Seperately, whether directly or by the Way of M r...
I have been prevented from writing you, a long Time by another Attack of a Fever, the Rests as I Suppose of that violent one which I had at Amsterdam two Years ago which was never perfectly cured.— This last I am perswaded will be of Service to me. I must now beg the Favour of you Gentlemen to inform me by Letter, how our Loan proceeds, and what Number of Obligations remain to be disposed of,...
I have received your Letter of the Second of December and am extreamly Sorry to learn, that a Number of M r Morris’s Bills have been protested. You did very prudently in writing immediately to M r Franklin, to enquire if M r Grand could afford you, any Assistance. I hope you have received a favourable Answer. I am waiting for Answers from M r Franklin to Letters written to him, to determine...
I have just received the Letter, you did me the Honour to write me on the 23 d: inst t: and approve very much of your proposed application to the Regency of Amsterdam. But I hope to consult with you, more particularly very soon.— I shall sett off as soon as possible, but as I must go round by Calais and Antwerp. and the Season is extremely rigorous, and travelling very bad, I fear it will be...
when I left Amsterdam, I despaired of doing any Thing to prevent the Bills of Exchange from being Sent back.— It is possible however that Something may have Since happened, to give Us better hopes.— I should be obliged to you, if you would inform me, whether there is yet any Ground to expect any Aid from the venerable Regency of your City, or not. The Commerce of the City is much interested in...
I am now to inform you, that I am ordered by Congress to this Country, and you will please to address your future Letters to me as Minister Plenipotentiary from the United States of America, at the Court of Great Britain. The Relation nevertheless between you and me, is not yet dissolved, because Congress have not yet sent me a Letter of Recall, nor appointed another Minister to succeed me at...
I have received your Letter of the 28 th. of June, and have conveyed your Letter to the Board of Treasury, by a Vessell which sails this Day for Rhode-Island— I feel most sensibly for the Misfortune of your late associates, De La Lande & Fynje—and as their affairs are most probably irretrievable, it would be to no purpose to enquire how the disaster happened, or to make any Reflections upon...