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    • Adams, John
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    • Smith, William Stephens

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In answer to your Letter of yesterday, you will give me leave to say, that your assistance and advice, has been at all times so usefull and agreable to me, that I should loose the advantage of it with reluctance if it were only for a few Weeks, or even day’s— nevertheless the month of august is so dull and so disgusting & unwholesome in London the Place is so deserted by Men of Business as...
I have rec d your Favours from Harwich, Amsterdam and Berlin, and congratulate you on your Reception by the King of Prussia. I Shall have much Occasion for your Assistance but Still I would not advise you, to leave Paris without Spending a Week or Ten Days there and being presented by M r Jefferson to the King, provided there is a Court day at Versailles. I have been much pressed with Business...
After a very pleasant Journey, here We are. We came very leisurely, dined the first day at Ingatestone and Slept at Witham, dined Yesterday at Mistley (Mr Rigbys Seat very near) and Slept where We now are, in full View of the Land Guard Fortification, with a fair Sun and fine Breeze. Our Carriage is on Board. As Fortune will have it, Hearn is the Captain. It is my third Passage with him. The...
According to Mr. Turgot’s idea of a perfect commonwealth, a single assembly is to be possessed of all authority, legislative, executive, and judicial. It will be a proper conclusion of all our speculations upon this, the most interesting subject which can employ the thoughts of men, to consider in what manner such an assembly will conduct its deliberations, and exert its power. The executive...
Congress by their resolutions of February the third 1787, determined that the letter to the Queen of Portugal herewith delivered you, should be transmitted to her Faithfull Majesty, by your Hands, you will therefore prepare yourself, as soon as conveniently may be, and proceed to Lisbon. In Your way, as you pass through france & Spain, you will of Course pay your respects to the Ministers of...
“The Secretary of the United States of America for the Department of foreign affaires, His Excellency John Jay to whom was referred a letter to him from the Honourable John Adams of the 27th. of June last, informing that the Queen of Portugal had ordered her squadron in the straits to protect the Vessels of the United States equally, with those of her own Subjects; on the 25th. day of January...
It should have been before observed, that the Western empire fell in the fifth century, and the Eastern in the fifteenth. Augustus was compelled by Odoacer, King of the Heruli. in 475, to abdicate the Western empire, and was the last Roman who possessed the Imperial dignity at Rome. The dominion of Italy fell, soon afterwards, into the hands of Theodoric the Goth. The Eastern empire lasted...
I was much obliged to you for a letter by Mr. Nesbit of Philadelphia, and am very sorry I could not have more of his company. He was much esteemed, I find, in Boston. I wished for you, when he was here, because you could never have a better opportunity of seeing your old military friends. We had a review of the militia, upon my farm; and a battle that threw down all my fences. I wish, however,...
I shall not entertain you with public affairs, because you will learn the state of them from the public papers more in detail. I shall only say, that the National Government has succeeded beyond the expectations, even of the sanguine, and is more popular, and has given more general satisfaction than I expected ever to live to see. The addition of Vermont and Kentucky, the augmentation of our...
Give me leave to congratulate you and my daughter, as well as your venerable Mother, and her and your amiable families on your arrival in America. The situation of that respectable office to which you have been promoted, and the unhappy sickness of the good Lady your Mother, made us all uncommonly anxious for your arrival, I hope you found your own family in health and your mother recovering....
I received yesterday your kind letter of the 9th of the month. The letters to Vergennes were sent to him, not presented. He acknowledged the receipt of them; and Congress acknowledged the receipt of the copies of them, and several others written before those two, upon the same subject, in a vote they passed about Sir John Temple. They say, that although Mr. Adams had thought fit to write a...
I Received yesterday your kind Letter of the 13 th and Return you and yours the Compliments of the Season and Thanks of your Congratulations on the Probability of a Cartain Election the felicities or infelicities of what Events however are Hidden from our Vew by that impenetrable Veil which Covers Futurity the Prospect at Present is not very bright a Country Impotent at Sea tho Powerful at...
I have received the Letter you wrote me on the 7th of this month, and I shall give all the attention to the Subject of it which may be necessary. It is not new to me— You are too precipitate in my opinion in pronouncing an opinion that the General has been guilty of high Crimes &C a: There have not been wanting Critics upon your conduct, as severe as you have been upon his It is reported not...
Before you receive this you will probably receive a letter from the Secy. at war informing you that the general officers have proposed either you or Mr. Hammond to be a Lt. Col. commandant. This event has embarassed me. I know not what to do. I know not whether the senate will not negative the nomination if I make it; nor whether you will accept the appointment if they should advise and...
I have received your letter of the 16th & the bundle of papers inclosed with a great deal of pain. The thing has not a good appearance. Mr. Shieflin had better have addressed his letter & papers to me than to you who are not the Secretary of War. You are suspected & have been accused of improper speculations in the neighborhood of Detroit & in connection with characters whose friendship does...
I have received your favor of the 23d of last month and read with pleasure, your account of the celebration of the 22d, according to my proclamation. A public prayer was very proper, but who was your chaplain? I have had some anxiety on that account. An unhappy, unfortunate gentleman may excite more levity, than reverence among the soldiery.— An emminent character and example of public virtue...
I have received your favor of the 2d & one or two letters before, recommending gentlemen to office. I am obliged by these communications & wish not to discourage you from continuing to give me information upon such subjects. If your recommendations should not be successfull, you will know the reason to be, that some other candidate presents with superior public claims. You mention not the...
Upon the receipt of your letter of the 21st, I sent a copy of it to General Hamilton, and the original to Mr. McHenry, and asked their candid opinion of it, without favor or affection. From General Hamilton I have as yet received no answer. From Mr. McHenry I have the inclosed, which is, I believe, a very honest answer; and, although I am not of his opinion in all points, I think there is...
I have appointed you Surveyor & Inspector, in the place of Mr. Lasher who has resigned. Your commission has been made out & delivered by the Secretary of State to the Secretary of the Treasury, who I presume has sent it to you, before now, but if by any accident, it has happened that you have not received it, you may enter immediately on the execution of the office & depend on receiving your...
I received last night your favor of the 18 & congratulate you on the receipt of your commission. You will do well to make a digest of the laws of the revenue, remembering Lord Cokes opinion, that abridgments are most useful to the makers of them. I have great relyance on your vigilance, activity & fidelity in the service. I know not whether your office corresponds with the Secretary of the...
I have received your favor of the 12th. & your bill, in favor of Mr Nathan Prime for 300 dollars, shall be paid whenever it shall be presented.—We all arrived safe & are one more domesticated at Stony field. We hope you are all in good health. A very long storm has confined us at home. I have scarcely known such an equinoctial, since we returned from Europe. Nature I hope is returning to her...
I duely recd yours of the 16th with the Paper enclosed. I had given no Attention to the Attack upon you in Cheethams Paper, because I know that no Integrity of heart, no Purity of Conduct, or Innocence of Life can protect any Man from the Shafts of Calumny, in these times of party rage and under an elective Government, which breeds Passions and prejudices as fast as ever the Sun upon the Slime...
My heart is one day as light as air and the next as heavy as lead. The Name of Hull, at one hour exalts my Imagination like a balloon to the Clouds: And a few Hours Afterwards the Same monosyllable depresses it to the Subterranean Caverns where Earthquakes are generated. How it has happened, that your Letter to your Mother of last December has never been acknowledged I know not. She read it to...
I have received, and read with—Sensations of grief and joy and Reflections of, (what shall I say approbation and disapprobation or of pride and humiliation? ) the Letter you wrote me on the 5th with all its enclosed papers. There seems to be, an irreversable decree against me, and every Being who has a drop of my blood in his or her Veins. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men Which taken at...
I received yesterday your favour of the 16th of last month. It is of no other use to ruminate upon the faults, Errors, and blunders of Congress and Washington in the revolutionary War, or upon those of Congress and Jefferson or Congress and Madison during the last twelve years; than to derive wisdom from their costly experience, and rectify our counsels and correct the conduct of our arms for...
Your Letter of the 5th. contains Such an Abundance of Matter which appears to me as of so great importance, that I really was under a temptation to Commit a violation of private and family Confidence by inclosing the original directly to the President. But the Appointment of General Armstrong to the War Office, has rendered Such a desperate Step unnecessary. Whether the new Secretary is your...
We were happy to find by your Letter 22d of May that you had arrived safe at Baltimore on your way to the great city of Washington—We have not pursued the jocular hints or menaces on promisses of advice to you in your legislative Capacity as yet—for reasons too many to enumerate. We do not however give up the right of Instructing you—when we please—We claim this priviledge—not as Friends—Not...
Your letters give us information as well as entertainment. Your reception at head Quarters & at the war office, augur well for the public. It is impossible that your ideas, your conversation, can be wholly lost to either Dearborne is really to be pitied. He is worn down and tormented by the disease that humbled the great spirit of Louis 14th; not to mention the misfortunes of the first year of...
Your favour of 15th is alarming. Remember the fate of Cassandra. The prophet of ill ’tho’ as true as a goose’s bow is always detested. I also have been now and then reckoned among the minor prophets. Not a bone of any Goose ever picked by Jo Green, Nick Boylston, & Master Lovel on a Christmas eve, tho’ they had Nat Gardner for a guest, and exhausted all their wit, Gibes, & Jokes upon it, ever...
It gave me great pleasure to be informed of your punctual arrival at the head quarters of good Principles and of good dispositions as I hope; of too little experience as I fear; and of too much eloquence as I certainly know. I need not quote to you “Dum Roma deliberat periat Seguntum.” My memory furnishes enough of examples of more modern date and nearer home. Canada was lost 35 or 36 years...