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I have received your kind letter of the April 1st. And am very sorry it will not be in my power to give you more detailed information That your Father was a steadfast Patriot, of the Revolution, from its beginning to its end, is most certain—In the Congress at New York in 1765, he we though young, he was one of the most active and spirited members. In the Congress of 74—and in all the...
Your favour of the 20th revives me. A Brother Octogenarian who can write with Such vigour of hand and mind, excites a kind of Emulation even in these old Veins. A History of the first War of The United States, is a very different thing from an History of The American Revolution. I have Seen in France a military History of France during the Reign of Louis the 14th. by the Marquis of Quincy....
Who Shall write the History of the American Revoluion? Who can write it? Who will ever be able to write it? The most essential Documents; the debates and deliberations in Congress from 1774 to 1783 were all in secret, and are now lost forever. Mr Dickinson printed a Speech which he aid he made in Congress against the declaration of Independence: but it appeared to me very different from that...
Your friendly letter of the first of this memorable month; bearing in the hand writing, the sentiments and the arrangement every mark of undecayed Vigour of mind and body: while it delights me in every other View mortifies me by a comparison with my own quivering Infirmities which make it painful and difficult for me to write. The History of Mankind, as far as We can race it, is full of...
I wish to recommend to your Benediction, the Gentleman who will have the honour to present to you, this Letter. Mr Francis C. Gray, a Son of our late Lt. Governor, who after an Education at our University, two Years travels in Europe and three Years Studies at the Bar, has Wisdom enough to wish to See more of his native Country. And Who, or what can he more rationally wish to See, than the...
Your Letter of the 15th, which I very highly esteem, now received last night, after I have given a line of introduction to Mr Everett, a very distinguished young Schollar, Preacher and Author. The Brittish Nation and their Government has sufficiently and uniformly manifested that disposition towards this Countrey for two hundred years. As they prefer the Roman Catholic Religion to Ours; So...
The Revd. Mr Edward Everett, though in early youth is desirous of Seeing the oldest Patriot and Statesman in America; and to gratify him I give him a Letter to you. As I cannot Say enough of him, I have a great mind to Say nothing at all; but I will Say, he has given to the World proofs of Genius Learning and Industry, which might be compared to a Pascal at his Age. Mr Colman has a Letter,...
Thanks for yours of the 15th. Mr Colman is much pleased and very grateful for your kind reception of him and regrets that his limited time would not permit him a longer Enjoyment of your Society and Civility. As far as I recollect to have heared; your Account of the political Sentiments of Pensilvania and Delaware are mathematically exact, in 1774.5.6 I mean. An Analysis of the Interests and...
Your favour of Aug. 28th has been duly received and highly esteemed. I say with you, the Will of eternal Wisdom and Benevolence, be done.— I wish to know, where the Anecdote of Sir William Keith is to be found. I have my doubts whether any History of America would “sell well.” Gordons, Ramsays, Warrens, even Marshalls I believe have not been very lucrative. No Party has been quite satisfied...
If I am committing an indiscretion, I hope you will pardon it. The Reverend Mr Henry Colman of Hingham, a Clergyman established in the Affections and Esteem of this Neighbourhood is on a Journey to Philadelphia. He has an Ardent desire to See the Old Patriots of the Revolution, and where can I look for an older one, than to Governor M. Kean? In addition to his professional Virtues of Piety and...
Your friendly letter of the 20th, with the Authentic Account of the proceedings of the Congress held at New York A.D 1765 on the Subject of the American Stamp Act”: though they found me in the deepest affliction for the loss of my Daughter; were very acceptable and deserve my thanks. There was a prior Congress, held at Albany in 1754 or 1755, in which Franklin, Hutchinson, Wells and Brattle...
I have received your kind letter of the 13th. of this month, with Emotions like those of two old Friends after a Seperation of many Years; Such as We may Suppose Ulysses to have felt on meeting one of his ancient Associates, (not one of the Suiters) on his return to Utica. Your Name among the Members of Congress in New York in October 1765 is and has long been a Singular distinction. I wish...
Our ancient and venerable Friend Clinton is gone before us. It had long been my intention to write to him: but while I was busied about many things perhaps of less importance, he has Slipped out of my reach. I am determined no longer to neglect a moment to write to you lest I Should glide away where there is no pen and ink. Nearly thirty eight years ago our friendship commenced. It has never...
Please to pay the above Sum of Thirty five Guineas to the Honble. Cotton Tufts or order and Charge it to account of Cash advanced agreeable to your Letter of Advice (by Mr Cutting) to 35 Guineas your most Obedt. Hum. Servt. DLC : Personal Papers—Miscellaneous.
Your Favour by M r Randall, I received last Night, by the Way of Marseilles, where I Suppose that Gentleman landed and Still remains, as he is not arrived here Whenever I may meet him, all that Attention shall be Shewn him which is due from me, to your Recommendation.— I wish you had oftener laid me under Obligation to you in this Way.— The Sight of your Letter refreshed me like the...
It is still as problematical as ever, what is the political System of this Republick, and indeed whether it has any System at all. They talk much and deliberate long, but execute nothing. By the Violence with which they speak and write of each other, a Stranger would think them ripe for a civil War. In the Assembly of the States of Guelderland, held to consider of the Requisition of the King...
I see in the London Courant, which arrived to day, an advertisement of a translation into English of the address to the People of the Netherlands: so that this work is likely to be translated into all Languages and read by all the World, notwithstanding the Placards against it. I have before sent that of Utrecht. That of Holland is as follows: “The States of Holland and of West Friesland, to...
Amsterdam, 18 October 1781. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC, Misc. Papers , Reel No. 1, f. 427–433). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:787–790. In this letter, a duplicate, JA discussed the war’s effect on Dutch trade. He reported that fishermen from Vlaardingen...
Amsterdam, 17 October 1781. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC, Misc. Papers , Reel No. 1, f. 423–426). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:782–783. Included in this letter, a duplicate, was an English translation of a placard issued at Utrecht on 3 Oct. against Aan...
I am very sorry to learn that Congress had recieved no Letters from October to June. It is not that I wrote less than usual in that period, but that I was more unfortunate. Two Vessels, which sailed from hence for Boston, each of which had Dispatches from me for Congress, destroyed them, one upon being taken, and the other being chased. But the most of my Dispatches were Lost at St. Eustatia,...
I wish, if it were possible, to communicate to Congress the present State of every Affair, which they have been pleased to confide in any measure to me. I have recieved the new Commission for Peace, and the Revocation of my Commission and Instructions of the 29th of September 1779. To both of these Measures of Congress, as to the Commands of my Sovereign, I shall pay the most exact Attention....
The Constitution of this Country is such, that it is difficult to discover the general Sense. There have been all along Circumstances in which it might be discerned; but these were so feeble, and so susceptible of Contradiction and Disguise, that some extraordinary Exertions were necessary to strike out unquestionable proofs of the Temper and Opinion of the Nation. Last Spring, the Part of...
The late glorious Victory, obtained by Admiral Zoutman over Admiral Parker, is wholly to be ascribed to the Exertions of Amsterdam. Pretences and Excuses would have been devised, for avoiding to send out the Fleet, and indeed for avoiding an Action, when at Sea, if it had not been for the Measures which have been taken to arouse the Attention and animate the Zeal of the Nation. The Officers...
We have recieved at last Parkers Account of the Action with Admiral Zoutman: according to which, the Battle was maintained with a continual fire for three Hours and forty Minutes, when it became impossible to work his Ships. He made an Attempt to recommence the Action, but found it impracticable. The Bienfaisant had lost his Main-Top-Mast, and the Buffalo her Mizzen Yard, and the other Vessels...
Mr. Temple has held offices of such Importance, and a Rank so considerable in America, before the Revolution, that his Return to his native Country at this time, cannot fail to cause much Speculation, and it is to be feared some diversity of sentiments concerning him. As he came from London to Amsterdam and did me the honor of a visit, in which he opened to me his design of returning, and his...
Amsterdam, 16 August 1781. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 370–373. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:640. This letter, read in Congress on 12 Nov., contains an English translation of a “verbal insinuation” to the Dutch minister at St. Petersburg,...
This People must have their own Way. They proceed like no other. There cannot be a more striking Example of this, than the Instructions given to Privateers and Letters of Mark. The Commander is ordered to bring his Prizes into some Port of the United Provinces, or into the Ports or Roads of the Allies and Friends of this Republick, especially France, Sweeden, North America, or Spain: and the...
Amsterdam, 6 August 1781. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 347–350. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:623.. In this letter, which was read in Congress on 16 Nov., John Adams provided an English translation of a report dated 13 July at St....
In several of the London Newspapers of July 26th. appeared the following paragraph. “An order has been sent from Lord Hillsborough’s Office for bringing Curson and Governieur, whom We sometime ago mentioned to have been confined by Command of Sir George Rodney and General Vaughan for having carried on a traiterous Correspondence with the Enemy at St. Eustatia, to Town to be confined in Newgate...
I should Scarcely be credited, if I were to describe the present State of this Country. There is more Animosity against one another, than against the common Ennemy. They can agree upon nothing. Neither upon War, nor Peace: neither upon acknowledging the Independency of America, nor upon denying it. Hopes of a general Peace, which flatter all Parties, are continually kept up by Tales and...
I have the honor to inclose Copies of some Papers which passed between the Comte de Vergennes and me, lately at Paris. The Conjecture, that the British Court would insist upon their two Preliminaries, is become more probable by the publication of the King’s Speech at the Prorogation of Parliament. “The Zeal and Ardor which You have shewn for the Honor of my Crown,” says the King; “your firm...
Amsterdam, 21 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 331–332. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:596–597. John Thaxter wrote this letter during John Adams’ absence at Paris. It contains an English translation of an article...
Amsterdam, 17 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 319–329 printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:584–588. John Thaxter wrote this letter during John Adams’ absence at Paris. It contains a full English translation of the memorial...
I have the honour to inclose Copy of a Letter to the Comte de Vergennes and of certain Articles and their Answers. The British Court proposed to the Imperial Courts a Congress upon two preliminary Conditions, the Rupture of the Treaty with France, and the Return of America to their Obedience. The two Imperial Courts have since proposed the inclosed Articles. Spain and France have prepared...
I have the honor to inclose Copy of a Letter to the Comte de Vergennes, and Copy of Articles and an Answer. Peace is so desirable an Object, that humanity as well as Policy demands of every Nation to hearken with Patience and Sincerity to every Proposition which has a tendency to it, even only in appearance. I cannot however see any symptoms of a sincere disposition to it in the English. They...
Amsterdam, 13 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 287–288. LbC Adams Papers . printed : JA, Corr. in the Boston Patriot Correspondence of the Late President Adams. Originally Published in the Boston Patriot. In a Series of Letters , Boston, 1809[–1810]; 10 pts. , p. 544–546. John Thaxter wrote this letter during John Adams’ absence at Paris. It provided an...
Amsterdam, 13 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 283–285. LbC Adams Papers . printed : JA, Corr. in the Boston Patriot Correspondence of the Late President Adams. Originally Published in the Boston Patriot. In a Series of Letters , Boston, 1809[–1810]; 10 pts. , p. 546–549. John Thaxter wrote this letter during John Adams’ absence at Paris. It contains an...
I have only time, by Major Jackson, to inform Congress, that upon Information from the Comte de Vergennes, that questions concerning Peace, under the Mediation of the two imperial Courts, were in agitation that required my Presence, I undertook the Journey and arrived here last Friday Night the 6th. of the month, and have twice waited on the Comte de Vergennes at Versailles, who this day...
Amsterdam, 10 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 268–269. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:556–557. John Thaxter wrote this letter during John Adams’ absence at Paris. It contains an English translation of an article that...
It is a long Time, Since I had the Pleasure to see you, but my Esteem is not at all diminished. None of Us have any Thing to boast of in these Times, in Respect to the Happiness of Life. You have been in disagreable Scaenes no doubt—mine have been much worse than I expected. I never heard of any Jealousy, Envy or Malevolence, among our Commissioners, at Paris, untill my Arrival at Bourdeaux....