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I thank you, for with all my heart for your Christmas Oration, which I have read with and reread with increased pleasure loving the philanthropic heart which dictated it not less than admiring the ingenious head which composed it. With any man who denies the Legitimacy of our Revolutionary War, or my Quasi War with France or Mr. Madison’s War with England, I will not dispute because there can...
I return you the address and my answer. I did receive an address from the sixth regiment in Gen Hulls division, which I sent on to Mr McHenry to answer according to law and usage. I will enquire what he has done. I return your hearty congratulations on the magnificent victory of Nelson. I believe it is without a precedent or parallel I am Sir with great regard MHi : Adams Family Papers,...
I received the honor of your letter of the 3d. yesterday. Inclosed is a short answer to the grand jury. I know the hand writing of the address very well. I went to E. Boston on Saturday to dine with you after spending two or three hours with Mr Gerry with whom I wished to converse a little more particularly concerning some things; but I was detained in Boston upon an indispensible piece of...
I have received the letter you did me the honor to write on the 26th. of last month and am much obliged to you for it. The judicial bill is still under consideration of the Senate, and although it has undergone many alterations and amendments it is imposible to say what further changes may be made in the house of representatives. The district judges may be annihilated altogether, and the...
I received your Favour of 12 Dec r , Some days ago, and rejoice to hear of your returning Health and increasing Family. I wish the Young Lady whom I love the better for the much respected Name you have given her as good an Husband as the World Shall afford, whether Charles Shall be fidele to his Engagements or not.— I thank you, Sir for your kind attention to my Sons, the eldest of whom I hope...
I presume this will meet you in Congress where No Doubt it is less irksome to Serve than heretofore, but not yet So agreable as it ought to be, and must be made.— The States will find themselves obliged to make their Delegates more comfortable & more honourable, if they do not See a Necessity of giving more Power to that assembly.— Many Gentlemen in Europe think the Powers in the Confederation...
I have rec d your Favour of the 16 of March, and in answer to it, I do assure you that I do not intend to decline taking a Seat in Congress, if any State in the Confederation shall think it worth while to offer me one. I am grown very ambitious of being a Limb of that Sovereign. I had rather be Master than Servant, upon the Same Principle that Men Swear at High Gate never to kiss the Maid,...
I have just received your Favour of March 12. O.S.— It has for Sometime been my Intention to embark for the Blue Hills as soon as the definitive Treaty should be Signed, or even Sooner if the Acceptance of my Resignation, which I transmitted on the 8 th day of last December, Should arrive before that Event. M r Vanberckel will Sail from the Texel in June, and it would be agreable to me to go...
I have received your favor of 14 th. February —and am not without hopes of receiving from Congress, in a few days, directions for advancing the money to you: But five thousand Pounds sterling is an enormous sum, and, in the opinion of some, more than the Treaty, in the present Circumstances will be worth. D r: Franklin started to me a doubt, whether you had not been imposed upon, and told of a...
I was honoured Yesterday with yours of 15 Jany. O.S. You must have learnt, sometime that the Peace is made, and the Armistice. You can no longer hesitate to make known your Errand. Whether the Advice of the Marquis de Verac is for it or against it, I should think you would now go to the Minister.— Your Instructions are Chains Strong Chains.— Whether you shall break them or no as We have been...
Your’s of December 30 th. , I recieved last Night. Orders are long since gone from M r. Grand to his Correspondent at S t. Petersbourg, to furnish You the Money You want.— You will find our Treaty inaccurate and blundering, but You will pardon all our Bulls, when You know the Haste and the Danger We were in, and think that We have done very well. I should advise You not to hesitate a Moment...
Your Letter of Nov r. 14/25 I recieved the night before last, & went out with it yesterday to Passy. D r. Franklin & I agreed to desire M r. Grand to give Orders to the Banker his Correspondent at S t. Petersbourg to furnish You with the Sum of Money You may have occasion for, so that your Treaty may be made as soon as You please. I should not be surprized, if the English Minister to the...
We have the Honour to congratulate you, on the Signature of the preliminary Treaty of Peace, between his Britannic Majesty and the United States of America, to be inserted in the definitive Treaty, when France and Britain Shall have agreed upon their Terms. The Articles, of which We do ourselves the honour to inclose you a Copy, were compleated, on the thirtieth of last Month. To Us, at this...
You may easily guess from your own Feelings, what mine may be in communicating to you, the Intelligence that the Preliminary Treaty, to be inserted in the diffinitive Treaty was Signed on the 30 Decr. by the Plenipotentiaries on each Side.— We have tolerable Satisfaction in the Missisippi the Boundaries, & the Fisheries and I hope not much to regret with regard to the Tories or any Thing else....
The King of G. Britain, by Patent under the Great Seal of his Kingdom has created Richard Oswald Esq, to be his Minister Plenipotentiary to treat with the Ministers of the United States of America. Thus G. B. is the 3 d Power in Europe, to acknowledge our Independence, She can no longer therefore contend that it is a Breach of the armed Neutrality or an Hostility against her to acknowledge...
I have recd your Favour of Sept. 5/16. if my Son can find a good oppertunity to come, I should be glad to see him. But should not be willing to trust him with every Companion. He is too young for such a Journey, unless in Company with a prudent Man. Mr John Adams has a Letter from Mr John Jay of 28. Ult. informing him, that Yesterday, Mr Oswald recd a Commission to treat of Peace with the...
I received yesterday your favor of 26th. Augst: OS. with Duplicates and Triplicates of a former letter and one original. These shall be sent by different vessells, as you desire. I agree to your Condition to make a minute of the postage, but you may inclose your letters to any one of the six following Gentlemen at Amsterdam and direct them to charge the postage to the U. S. viz Wilhem or Jan...
It grieves me when I think how long it is since I wrote you. But my head and hands and heart have been all full. I sent, to the Care of the Dutch Ambassador, General Washington’s miniature, for you. Should be glad to know whether you have recd. it. I have also sent along several Dispatches from our Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Have you received them? Fitzherbert’s Commission is to treat with...
I have recd. the two halves of your letter to Congress, and they have been sent on. I sent you a few days since a packett fm. our Minister of foreign Affairs. Sometime ago, I sent unto you the miniature of Genl. Washington, wh. Mr. Searle gave me, and I am anxious to learn that you have recd. it. I can give you no news fm. America, France, Spain or Holland, but what you will have previously...
Yours of April 12/23 is just come to hand: Last night, for the first time, I Slept in this House, and I hope that the Air of the Hague will have a good Effect upon my Health, otherwise I must embark for the blue Hills. The Independance of America, has been acknowledged by this Republick, with a Solemnity and Unanimity, which has made it, in a peculiar Sense the National Act. The Publication of...
Yours of 28 March is this day recd —the other Paper you mentioned I also recd, but after my Letter was written. Your other Letters are also recd. You will have Seen by the Papers, that the great Point is gained here with much Unanimity, and many indifferent People think it a great Point. I may think more highly of it, than it deserves, but it has ever appeared to me, the turning Point. Be this...
Your favour of Feb 10/21. arrived last night, and I thank you for the Copy inclosed. I think that if the Ct. of St. James’s is capable of taking a hint, she may see herself advised to acknowledge the Sovereignty of the U.S. and admit their Ministers to the Congress. There Seems to be a Change of System in England, but the Change is too late: the Kingdom is undone past Redemption. Minorca, St...
Your favor of Decr. 31st/Jany. 11th 1781.2 I recieved Yesterday, and in an hour or two after the Letters inclosed were sent in to me. As I have not recieved any of my Letters by the Viscount de Noailles or the Marquiss, I was very anxious to know the News and took Advantage of your Permission to open the Letters. That from Mrs. gave me vast pleasure—it put me in Spirits for the whole day. The...
This day was brought me, your kind favour of August 28th. the first Line I have received from you, Since We parted. A Line from my dear Son, aug. 21. O.S. which I recd 3 days ago, was the first from him. The publick News from America, you have before now. It is grand and I congratulate you upon it, with a gratefull Heart. Our allies have this year adopted a System, which you and I have long...
I am at no Loss, what Advice to give you, in answer to the Questions in your letter of this day, because they relate to a Subject, on which I have long reflected, and have formed an opinion, as fully as my Understanding is capable of. I think then that it is necessary for you to prepare for a Journey to Petersbourg without Loss of Time, that you travel in the Character of a Gentleman, without...
I have recieved several Letters from You, but have been so busy signing my Name, that I could not answer. I give You Joy of Laurens’s Arrival—it is a great Event. I hope he brought You an important Paper, which Lovel mentions in his Letter to You, and Gerry in an excellent one to me. I rejoice Sir in your Honour, and in the public Good, but I feel myself weakened and grieved at the present...
I dont know whether I have acknowledged yours of the 12th. Feby.: that of the 25th. came to me yesterday. The Letter inclosed was from Mr. I. Smith of 18 Decr. He says they were busily employed in raising their Quota for the Army during the War or for three Years, and that the other Provinces were doing the same. He says Mrs. Dana was well a few days before: that Davis had arrived after having...
I had yesterday the Pleasure of receiving two Letters from you, one dated Feb. 1. and one without a date, but I suppose written the day before. With these I received the Packetts, but there are in them no Letters from my Wife. The Resolution of Congress of the 12 of December, gives me great Pleasure, as it proves that We had the good Fortune to be possessed of the true Principles of Congress...
Yesterday I had the Pleasure of yours of the 7th. both the Packetts came Safe and in good order. As to a secret Address, you may direct under Cover, A Madame La Veuve du Mr. Henry Schorn, op de Agterburg wall by de Hoogstraat Amsterdam. It is not possible to suppress all suspicions after the Conversation you heard: but your own Coolness and Judgment, will be Sufficient without any hint from...
This will be delivered you by Mr. Samuel Hartley, who is recommended to me by Mr. Digges and Mr. David Hartley. I should be obliged to you for any Civilities you may shew him. Mr. Digges recommends him as an open Friend to the American Cause. There is no News here but what you will see in the Leyden Gazette which is my Vehicle for conveying the News. Pray write me if you have any. I shall not...
Yours of 27 Ultimo came to hand last night. Mr. Bradford informs me that he Sent to Paris by Post a Packet from Dr. Cooper to me. Have you heard nothing of it? Upon my first Arrival I told Mr. De Neufville, that I had orders to pay him 60£ st. for you and offered to do it then; but he has put it off. There are no Vessells here going to Massachusetts—but there is one going to Rhode Island, and...
I have received yours of 19. I have your Form of the Constitution and Some News Papers, none later than those you have. These I shall send by the first private opportunity. I forwarded your Letters by the last Post or two. The Constitution will probably be accepted, at least that is the opinion of all the Americans here. Last night I had an Account of Mr. Stephens’s Letter to Lloyds Coffee...
I have received your Letter of the 1. of this month and the Packetts you Sent with it, by Mr. Appleton. The arrival of the Convoy, at Bourdeaux is a fortunate Circumstance for Commerce: but I want to know the News and whether any of those Vessells were upon public Account, and whether any thing is sent to Us. I have taken a cursory View of Brussells, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Delft, the Hague,...
In Some of the latest Letters from England, We are told, that they grow more and more out of humour with the Americans every day, and that it is the Fashion now of the Minority, as well as the Friends of Administration to abuse them, both in and out of Parliament. In a Particular Mr. Powis Mr. Fox &c. express their Abhorrence of Congress—call them the worst of Tyrants and Say they deserve to...
I wish you Joy of your new, Scaene and Stage: You will act your Part well I doubt not, and I hope you will have much Pleasure and Reputation in it. I should be much obliged to you for a Letter, now and then. Let me know if you please, the Principal Things done in Congress, and in Camp: but especially, I should be very anxious to know, every Intimation you may have in your Intelligence from...
Your obliging Favour of July 28. I duely received. Am glad to hear that your third Freshmanship is a busy one. I think you commence a fourth, at Philadelphia, very Soon. I have presumed to lay before the General Court a Proposal, to choose Nine Delegates. That their Duty may be discharged here in Rotation. The Service here is too hard, for any one, to be continued So long; at least for me. Who...
In the Lists of the House and Board, I was as much pleased to find your Name among the latter as I was chagrined to find it omitted in the former. This is one among numberless Advantages of a Middle Branch of the Legislature, that a Place may be found in it, for such distinguished Friends of their Country, as are omitted by the People in the Choice of their Representatives. This is an...