You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, John
  • Recipient

    • Cranch, Richard

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Cranch, Richard"
Results 1-31 of 31 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
For Value received I promise to pay Richard Cranch Esq, o n order, Two thousand two hundred and fifty one Dollars in twelve months from this date, with Interest untill paid Testis Cotton Tufts 1806. October. 13th. Received Sixty Seven Dollars and Fifty Three Cents for one half years Interest on the above Note also the further Sum of fifty one Dollars in part of principal recd. by the hand of...
Braintree October–December? 1758. Printed: JA, Earliest Diary The Earliest Diary of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1966. , p. 69–70 , from a draft, with the principal variations from text of RC ( Adams Papers ) recorded in notes. Printed ( JA, Earliest Diary The Earliest Diary of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1966. , p.
I received your Favour of 22 July, by last Tuesdays post. I thank you for the Trouble you have taken to inform me of the Circumstances of your Family and my own. It gives me great Joy to think your Symptoms were so favourable.—I had a Letter, from my best Friend by the same Conveyance, which gave me more Pleasure than many Times its Weight in Gold would have done. You mention the Exultation at...
I thank you most kindly for your obliging Letter. And beg the Continuance of your Correspondence. Every Line from Boston is a Cordial, and of great Use to us in our Business. It is a grief to my Heart that I cannot write to my Friends so often and particularly as I wish. But Politicks I cant write, in Honour. I send the Votes of Yesterday, which are ordered to be printed, and this is the only...
In yours of the 10th. of Novr. you desire me to give you the Connection between the Premises and conclusion, when I said that the Navigation act would compell all the other states to imitate it. If they do not the Massachusetts will soon get so much of their carrying Trade as will richly compensate her for any present Inconvenience. I take it for granted that the United States will make peace...
I believe there is not another Man in the World whose Life has been such a series of Remorses as mine. It seems as if there was a Destiny that I should never be paid. The time is drawing near, for eleven or twelve months will soon be round, when we embark for Home. This is an irksome undertaking—to break up a settled habitation and remove a family across the Seas, at any time of life is no...
Since my Arrival here 26 October, untill the 30 of November, We had a constant Scuffle Morning noon and night about Cod and Haddock on the Grand Bank Deer skins on the Ohio and Pine Trees at Penobscat, and what were worse than all the Refugees. The Denouement of the Plott has had in it as much of the sublime and Pathetic as any Part of the Piece. It was comical too as you shall one day know in...
During Such great Changes as We have seen When the whole World is put out of its Course and all Men are called to Act in scænes that are new to them, great Irregularities must be expected. But can any Nation ever hope to have Commerce and a Circulation of Property and Industry where the Courts of Justice are not opened. where every Man is not conscious that he can compell others to do him...
I have received your kind Letter of June 3. and rejoice to hear of the Health and Welfare of our Friends. The County did themselves Justice, when they put you into the Senate, and the State did itself Honour when it placed Mr. Bowdoin in the Chair. I think you must be happy and prosper under his Administration. The Massachusetts, wise as it often has been, never Struck a more masterly Stroke,...
I have but a few Moments, to congratulate you on the fresh Blessing to your Family.—Another fine Child and Sister comfortable! Oh fine! I know the Feeling as well as you and in Spight of your earlier Marriage, I knew it sooner than you.—Here you must own I have the Advantage of you.—But what shall we do with this young Fry?—In a little while Johnny must go to Colledge, and Nabby must have fine...
I am here in anxious Expectation of the Arrival of my Family, which I hope are coming in Calahan. When I Shall have the Happiness to see you I know not, but I think it probable I Shall remain here untill I return to America, as We learn nothing of any determinations of Congress. M rs & Miss Adams will not be Sorry to have made a Trip to the Hague provided they are not obliged to Stay long, and...
Can you give me any Information concerning the Persons named in the inclosed Paper? Mr Jenkinson, I presume, has, by his late Motions in Parliament, all of which are carried without opposition, convinced the People of America, that they have nothing but a ruinous Commerce to expect with England. Our Crisis is at hand, and if the states do not hang together, they might as well have been “hanged...
I am much obliged to you for your judicious Letter of Oct r. 15. you have described the Causes of the present Evil with Accuracy, and the Cure is equally obvious. I mean a partial Cure— as far as the difficulty arises from Property having been thrown by the Course of the War into Hands, unable to hold it, there is no remedy but time & the Course of Law, in this respect, the present times...
I am much obliged to you for your judicious Letter of Oct r. 15. 1 you have described the Causes of the present Evil with Accuracy, and the Cure is equally obvious. I mean a partial Cure—as far as the difficulty arises from Property having been thrown by the Course of the War into Hands, unable to hold it, there is no remedy but time & the Course of Law in this respect, the present times...
I am set down with a Design of writing to you.—But the narrow Sphere I move in, and the lonely unsociable Life I lead, can furnish a Letter with little more than Complaints of my hard fortune. I am condemnd to keep School two Years longer. This I sometimes consider as a very grievous Calamity and almost sink under the Weight of Woe.—But shall I dare to complain and to murmur against Providence...
In my last you remember I desired your sincere Opinion of the new Resolution I had taken, but as you have not yet been so kind as to send it, I must beg your patience while I tell you my sincere opinion of it. The Law, I take to be a very difficult and a very extensive Science and to acquire any considerable degree of knowledge in the Theory and of skill in the Practice, a serene head, a large...
Last Evening, Mr. Jefferson, my worthy Friend called upon me to shew me a Letter from Mr. Gerry which came by the March Packet, in which it is said that Mr. Adams is appointed to London, so that I suppose you will have no more occasion to write to me, but in that way. It will be pleasanter in some respects to me and my Family to be in England, than in France, or Holland, but it will be more...
I have recd your Favour of 20 May. The Southern States will be forced to co operate with the Middle and northern ones, in measures for encouraging Navigation, because otherwise they will not be able to obtain ships for the Exportation of their Produce. The English have not and cannot obtain Ships, at a rate cheap enough for the purpose. The Ships taken from the Dutch, French Spaniards and...
“I can tell you no secrets about Peace—a Mr. Forth, a Mr. Aswald Oswald and a Mr. Greenville have been at Paris, to sound the Dispositions, but I cannot learn that they have sufficient Powers, or that they have made any serious Propositions. The work of Peace is very difficult to accomplish. The pretentions of so many Nations, are to be adjusted, that my Hopes are faint. It serves the Stocks...
I have long wished for an Opportunity to write to you but the thousand things that have surrounded me have prevented. Mr. Williams has promised me to write you concerning your Affairs and I suppose he has done it. I am not able to inform you of anything concerning them. There is a Society here resembling the Society of Arts &c. in London. It is called “Le Societe libre d’emulation.” It gives...
I have received with very great Pleasure, your favours of June 26 and July 18. If my Townsmen of Marblehead, Salem, Cape Anne, Plymouth &c. are pleased with the Peace, I am very glad: But We have yet to Secure, if We can, the Right to carry Some of their Fish to market. This and other Things is like to detain me longer here than I expected. I do not regret this, on Account of what you Say is...
Your kind Letter of 20 Jany. I received Yesterday. Mr. Tylers Letter inclosed is here answered. Your Opinion has great Weight with me. I hope to See Mrs. and Miss Adams before this reaches you. I have as yet received no Letters from them by this Vessell. They may be on the Way. By a quiet Life, riding on Horse back and constant Care I am somewhat better, but I shall never be a Strong Man. Yet...
“I am among a People, whose slowness puts all my Patience to the Tryal, and in a Climate which is too much for my Constitution: I love this Nation however, because they love Liberty.—You will have learn’d the Progress of our Affairs here, which has been slow but sure. —This Dutch Legation has very nearly cost me my Life, and has taken away forever much of my Strength, and some of my Memory....
In a Letter to R. R. Livingston, Secretary of state for foreign Affairs, dated The Hague July 23. 1783, I gave him an account of Conversations with Mr. Van Berckel and others, in which I learn’d that there were in holland a great Number of Refineries of Sugar; “that all their own Sugars were not half enough to employ their Sugar Houses, and that at least one half of the sugars refined in...
I have been determined, a long Time, to write you by the first Opportunity that should present, of sending a Letter. Two or Three Opportunities have presented; but so suddenly, that I could not obtain Time to write one Line. I now write intending to have my Letter in Readiness, against another Bearer appears. I rejoiced very heartily last Night, at Hearing of your Welfare by Mr. Grosvenor. I...
I promised to write you an account of the scituation of my mind. The natural strength of my facultys is quite insufficient for the task. Attend therefore to the invocation. Oh! thou goddess, Muse, or Whatever is thy name who inspired immortal Miltons pen with a confusion ten thousand times confounded, when describing Satan’s Voyage thro’ Chaos, help me in the same cragged strains, to sing...
I have only the time to inform you, that this morning I am to Sett out, with My Wife and Daughter, with her little Son, to See your Country of Devonshire.— The air of London like that of Paris and Amsterdam, is in Summer, tainted to Such a degree, that all who can possibly get out of it; fly it, like a Pestilence. M rs Adams, has for the last nine months been affected by this Climate, with...
D r Tufts will give you a Strange Book. I know not whether, the Sentiments of it, will be approved, by the Men of Sense and Letters in America.— if they are, they will make themselves popular in time. if they are not, our Countrymen have many Miseries yet to go through. if the System attempted to be defended in those Letters, is not the System of the Wisest Men among Us, I shall tremble for...
I had the honour of Addressing you on the 28th. November and 3d. Ultimo in Official Letters from Congress. My present business is to intreat your protection to the inclosed Packet from Baron Kalb which he intimates to me is intended to be of particular service to these States. You will be pleased either to take it under your immediate care if you intend within a few Weeks to embark for France...
I send you a Volume of Politics. A Second Volume will be ready in 6 or 7 Weeks.—You will hear more about this Paper, in time. I have received several kind Letters from you. Pray continue to write me, altho you should be disappointed of my Answers. I have noted your Desire, in one of them and have taken such measures as I could, but fear you have received nothing as yet, although some have been...
I am very much obliged to you, for your Friend Ship to my Brother Adams, and hope that his Conduct in his new office, will do no dishonour to his Appointment but he will stand in need sometimes of your Advice. Inclosed with this is a Book of my Friend Jefferson, which, you will entrust to none but faith full Friends. It is not yet to be published. We are at War with Morocco, Algiers, Tunis and...