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    • Adams, John
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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston

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I have suffered a great deal of Anxiety on your Account, having heard of your severe sickness. But am very glad to learn that you are better. I hope you will remember to whom you are obliged for your Restoration to Health, and that you will be sensible of the kind Care of your Mamma in your Illness and thankfull for it. Your excellent Grandmamma, it is to be feared, took the Distemper which...
I believe I must make a Phisician of you. There seems to be a Propriety in your studying Physick, because your Great Great Grandfather after whom you was named, was of that Profession. Would it not please you to study Nature, in all her wonderfull Operations, and to relieve your Fellow Creatures under the severest Pains, and Distresses to which human Nature is liable. Is not this better than...
The only Reason why I omitted to write you when I wrote to your Brothers, was because I thought you was as yet too young to be able to read Writing, not because I had less Affection for you than for them: for you may rely upon it, you have as great a share in your Fathers Esteem and Affection as any of his Children. I hope you will be good and learn to read and write well, and then I shall...
I am glad to find by your Letter that you are so well situated, at Mr. Sewalls, make my Compliments to that Gent. and thank him for the Kind present of his translation of Young—it appears to me to be well done. You will write to me from time to time, if you want Books, or any assistance in your studies, from this side the Water. I hear a good account of your Conduct, your studies you must...
I have this morning received your manly letter of 25 th Ult.— I had long intended to write you but as you observe avocations have always intervened. Public business my son, must always be done by somebody.— it will be done by somebody or other— If wise men decline it others will not: if honest men refuse it, others will not. A young man should well weigh his plans. Integrity should be...
I once more wish you a prosperous Voyage an honourable Conduct and a happy Life. Remember your Characters as Men of Business as well as Men of Virtue, and always depend on the Affection and Friendship of your Father RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “My Sons”; internal address: “John Quincy and Thomas Boylston Adams”; endorsed by JQA : “My Father 14. Sept r: 1794. / Rec d: at Boston.” Tr ( Adams...
You have lost the Opportunity of sharing in the Glory of some of your Friends in this City, who have been out and returned, from the Campain against the Insurrection in the four Western Counties of Pensilvania. Your Friend Climer lost his Life, and is greatly lamented. ’Squire Cranch as his Father calls him was here Yesterday with M r Greenleaf, whose Agent as well as Lawyer he is to be at the...
Your Letter of the 19 of October from London gave me great Joy and all your other Friends of whom you have many much Pleasure— And I was again highly delighted to hear from M r Jay that he had Letters from your Brother at Amsterdam the 20 th of Nov r. M r Wilcocks who is kind enough to take Charge of this Letter is probably an Acquaintance of your s : You must take him with you in your Daily...
Your kind Letters of Nov. 2. and Dec r 20 are before me. You will Soon learn the meaning of the Word Ennui, among others in the French Language, which have no parallel Expression in English. I Suffered more from this Dæmon in Europe than I can express; more for what I know than from all the other Pains of my whole Life. had I not found in Books a relief from it, I should have perished under...
I last Week at Philadelphia rec d your kind Letter of April by Capt n Boadge, and it has been a delicious Morcell to me and to several other of your Friends. As you are in the best Country of Europe for the study of the civil Law, I hope you will embrace the Opportunity of making yourself acquainted with all the best Writers on that divine Science, as my Master Gridley used to call it. The...
M r Hindman of Maryland has requested a Letter from me, for M r Richard Cook of Anapolis, who will tell you our News. I have read your public Dispatches with great Pleasure. I find your Situation has led you to an Attentive Observation of the Events of the War and the Maneuvres of Politicks and your curious felicity of Expression enables you to represent both to great Advantage. Your Mother...
It is a long time Since I have rec d a Letter from you and it is too long Since I have written to you. I have read your Dispatches as Chargé d’affaires at the Hague with much Satisfaction: But I find the Secretary of the Treasury is anxious to hear from You on the subject of Affairs in Holland which have more immediate Relation to his Office. The House of Representatives of U.S. are engaged in...
I am extreamly sorry to hear that you have been ill of your old Complaint: but was somewhat consoled at the same time by hearing you were better. Exercise of Walking or riding will be your Life in Holland. Our Affairs are assuming a face of good Humour which is very pleasant after so long a storm. We shall have Peace and good Gov t for some Years I hope— I long to learn your Intentions about...
It is a long time Since I have rec d any Letter from you, and the Report that you have had a Return of your Rheumatism has allarmed me— We heard that you were better but should be glad to know the Particulars. I am once more happy at home, and my Farm, by the help of a fine rainy season shines very bright.— I Should be glad to be informed, of your Plans and Views— Whether You mean to return or...
It was no longer ago than Yesterday that I received your kind Letter of the 14. of December last, which arrived, after a long Passage, I Suppose, at Baltimore, and came from thence by the Post which carried them to Cape Cod and then returned them to Quincy. We have been anxious on your Account as We had rec d no Letter except your Letter of Introduction to M r De Persyn, and We heard you had...
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...
Your Brother is appointed to Berlin, but you I presume will soon return to America; perhaps you may be upon your passage, and this Letter may not reach you, before You Sail I long to see you, but yet I am Very sensible it must be a cruel separation to your Brother— Who he can obtain for a Secretary I know not. The family is all here, and are as happy as the absence of all our Children, and the...
I have rec d your charming narration of your Tour to Paris, both to me and your mother, and am happy to find you were so civilly treated and so well pleased. I shall never forget the kindness of my Friend Arnoux to myself or to you. I congratulate you, on your new Acquisition of a Sister. I Suppose this match grew out of a Spark that was kindled at Nantes in 1779 when your Brother was with me...
The daily Duties of my office require so much Writing that my hand and head are fatigued & exhausted before I have half done: and this must be my apology for not writing you till now. I hope you are now well settled in your Office and pursuing your studies. Practice will come in time, but the most certainly from an incessant Attendance upon the courts and taking minutes & making Reports of...
I received last night your favour of the 15th, the Sentiments and expressions of which are Such as are such as cannot fail to render your Character Prosperity and Happiness more dear to me than ever. An Office must be procured, and the Price or Rent must not be an Obstacle. I had rather pay for you a high Rent than you should not have an Office in Market or Chesnut Street. Your Brothers...
Since you are desirous of a Confidence in the Breast of your Father, and he is not less anxious to possess one in yours, I will open myself to you as soon as time will permit, upon Several Subjects and without assuming to dictate or controul will give you my candid, and frank advice. Although you have had a regular Education in the Theory and Practice of the Law, under a Master as eminent as...
I have not received a letter from you since I left you. As I hear nothing of the epidemic in Philadelphia, I begin to hope that such a calamity will this year be spared to that city. I should be gratified to hear of your health and success. I could fill a sheet with curious anecdotes of politicks & electioneering, but as this is a subject on which I ought not to permit myself to write speak or...
I thank you for your favour of July 26. I always rejoice to hear of your Arguing Causes. This Arguing is the way to business. Argue; Argue; Argue; forever when you can, and never be concerned about the issue, any further than you ought to interest yourself for truth and Justice. If you Speak in public, tho you loose your cause, it will Serve your reputation, if you Speak well, as much as if...
I received last night your favor of the 18th. I thank you for your account of the proceedings of the Supreme court.—I really believe you are right & that I was erroneous, in what we have said about the influence of politicks at the bar in Pensylvania. Indeed any where affected politicks do a man no good. I did not mean to prejudice you against your Quakers friends, who I doubt not are...
I am greatly pleased with your letter of the 30 Aug. Every part of it shows a sound understanding & a manly honest heart. Your conduct at the meetings was wise as well as generous. Never mind majorities. Weigh well & judge right & never fear being in a minority. You are right to mix with your fellow citizens at their invitation to their consultations. Although Horatius has sacrificed to the...
Upon the subject of your letter of the 1st. I can only say that I was prepared to hear all that you relate before I heard it from his wife and Col. Smith. A being so lost to all sense of morality & all social feelings cannot be reclaimed. There is MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have recd this Evening yours of the 14th. My little bark has been oversett in a Squal of Thunder and Lightening and hail attended with a Strong Smell of Sulphur. Nothing remains for me, but to indulge that Vanity which I have found out lately is considered as the predominant feature in my Character, by Singing the Song of Horace Virtus repulsæ nescia sordidæ Intaminatis fulget honoribus Nec...
I have appointed Mr. Jay, Chief Justice. He may refuse, if he should, I shall follow the line of judges most probably,& then there will be a vacancy. I wish to know if Mr. Ingersoll would accept an appointment as one of the assistant Justices of the superior court, & in that case I wish for his opinion as well as yours of the proper character for the office of district Attorney. Will Mr....
In one of your Letters you say there is much murmuring concerning the Convention with France. This is natural. Those who have laboured to defeat the Negotiation and those who have endeavoured to make it unpopular, from the beginning will still strive to defeat and to disgrace the Result. I shall confine myself at present to one point the apparent Collision between this Convention and our...
I thank you for yours of the 9th and its contents, and for the pains to have taken to Search Authorities upon the Collision of Treaties. The Point I think is explained and proved very fully, and So it is understood in England. The Sixth Article however is by no means nugatory. It is of great importance to France. Our Treaty with Britain expires in two years after the termination of the present...