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    • Adams, John
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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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If Nature in scattering her bounties had bestowed upon me the genius of a Poet or a Painter I would entertain you with a description of a scene of sublimity, beauty, and novelty, such as eighty four winters never before presented to my sight: when I arose in the morning, the Sun was rising, the heavens were not of Brass but the Sky was a vast concave of clear blue marble and the earth was of...
As I take a great interest in your pleasures, and your troubles, your last Journal has given me a large share of both—the social scenes are delightful and the prospect of trouble is afflicting—I am interested too in the Journey of our Collegians who came here on Thursday—sett all the Tailors with their Needles in Motion—and on Saturday went to Boston with their Uncle who fitted them off with...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that Mr. Randolph of Roanoke is in a state of insanity, and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr. Randolph has appeared through his whole Public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengeance without cause against...
Your journal to the 21st. ult—has given me much amusement and much pleasure I want to touch upon twenty things but that number is too great. The Missouri question is the most magnificent and portentous. I have no doubt of the right of Congress to stop the progress of Slavery, and if I were disposed to give you my reasons I Should think it unnecessary since I have read a review of Judge Story &...
Your favor of the 16th. is a reviving cordial in which I have languished for a fortnight—But I have to complain, that it is only two days, since I heard since I heard of George’s misfortune. I suppose it has been concealed in tenderness to me, but I wish to hear the worst of bad news from the begining. This tenderness for me has concealed many misfortunes which if they had been communicated to...
your journals grow more and more entertaining and instructive—you ask my Opinion of General Jackson—and you shall have it—Hero and a Conqueror I cannot say that he has transgressed the Law of Nations in any one point—certainly neither Spain nor England has any right to complain; if he has transgressed any punctilios of the Constitution neither Spain nor England have anything to do with...
I have received yours of the 3d.—I can only say if Susan will return to me with her Child and live in my complicated Family—she will be welcome to my heart—I will protect her at all hazards, as long as I live, and I will keep peace in my house, as long as I shall have the means, and the power—she must return to me, and there must not and shall not be family bickerings— Your Children have given...
I thank you for your journals and pray you to continue them for they are a refreshing amusement to me in my desolation and solitude for such is my real condition through your three Sons visit me commonly once a week and cheer my drooping spirits and although my neighbours and friends are universally kind to me and solace my sorrows as much as they can and what is much more even my enemies seem...
I have received your last Journal, and thank you for it. When the Lady asked you which you prefered, the Illiad, or Paradise lost, you should have answered her as we New-England people do, by asking her another question, pray Madam do you read the Illiad in Greek, or in Pope. I wonder not that you threw your arms round your husband upon reading his answer to General Smyth, I would have done...
your Journal interesting to me like all the former, has been received up to the 29th of March.— The people of this Country when they are prejudiced against a Man, or a Name,—will not suffer him to take the least notice of any of his relations, however distant—tho their merits and service’s may have been ever so great—but when they are prejudiced in favour of a Man, or a Name they will applaud...