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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I thank you for a very pleasant letter, and I supplicate a continuance of them—I have given up the hopes of seeing the family, or any part of it this Year—but when the Marquis is gone I hope to have letters from your Brother, John, and yourself, which will help to keep up my old spirits a little longer, my heart & wishes and Prayers are with you forever—We have nothing to tell you here but...
I thank you for your two letters—and I wish you would continue to write to me twice a week—my dear Charles Mathematicks and Law are the two rocks on which a Man of business may surely found his reputation, as well as his capacity for doing good, to himself, his friends, his country, as well as to mankind. Study my dear Charles makes the man. It is not novels or Poetry It is neither Scott or...
I am much pleased with your frankness in relating the manners and customs of your School—talking playing and whistling are amusements not fit to be indulged or tolerated in the scene of Education for Youth—and you bear an honorable testimony in favour of your excellent School in Boston—I hope your Parents will bring you with them next Summer—and place you again at Mr Goulds most excellent...
I now hope to see you, after 8 years Absence. I cannot write you a formal Letter. You have a kind of fame for a facility of learning Languages. Let me caution you against indulging that Curiosity too much. Languages are a boundless and unfathomable Ocean. Greek and Latin and Arithmatick and Geometry are your most proper Studies at present. French and Italian and German will be easy here after...
Knowing as I do the whirlwind of business, ceremony, Levee’s Drawing rooms Dinners, Parties, with which you are hurried away, I acknowledge it a great favour for you to write a letter to me—and when I receive one, it is so much the more pleasure— As to the Message a Father says, that a more meritorious state paper has never appeared on the American Annals; And I think it gives as universal...
Did you send me a pritty address of the President of Columbia College, which I received this Morning. Who is this Revnd. Dr William Staughton, is he a native American, or a foreigner, was he Educated in Rhode Island College, Is he a Baptist, or of what denomination; he appears to me an amiable Man and a good scholar.—He says that Man on his enterance on existence, is unconscious of danger and...
Some of Jobs afflictions and some of Jobs comforts have prevented my answering your letters, as far as no 30. I hope you will persever in stud y ing Barbaracque. I hope you will critically study his Notes and his quotations in latin and Greek from the Ancients. Endeavour to pick and search out their meaning.— Mr Russells letter and your Fathers remarks are arrived and running the round of...
Your kind letter of the 21st. has given me great satisfaction, indeed you have been very good I have received letters from all places you stoped at, as far as Trenton—The safe arrival of you all at Washington is very agreeable news—I hope you will not expose yourselves to the pestilence that walks in darkness through the whole region round about you—I hope the frosts have before this time...
I am well pleased with your No’s: 31. 32 & hope you will continue the subject. I see nothing on the quarterly review but the Johnsonian antipathy to Scotland. That Mr. Locke has had greater influence on the intellectual moral & political world than any man of the last century I believe; but to deny that Reid & Stuart have made no improvements a upon Locke appears to me an iniquitous partiality...
yours of the 26th. January is received. I pray you to attend as much as possible, to every Court, and every scene in which law questions are discussed or mooted. Observe patiently and critically the conduct of Judges Counsellors, Jurors parties, Witnesses and spectators. And by no means fail to provide yourself with an ample apparatus for writing, a pocket ink horn, plenty of ink, good pens...