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The information in your last letter, of your return to your garden and your records has given me great pleasure. The records are very interesting, and your translation of them will be an honourable and a durable Monument to your Memory Your friend and my friend Mr Tyng has told you truely that I am “constantly employed” and may add, beyond my Strength of body or mind. Never in my whole life...
I thank you for a very pleasant letter, and I supplicate a continuance of them—I have given up the hopes of seeing the family, or any part of it this Year—but when the Marquis is gone I hope to have letters from your Brother, John, and yourself, which will help to keep up my old spirits a little longer, my heart & wishes and Prayers are with you forever—We have nothing to tell you here but...
In reply to your question, upon what map did the Commissioners trace the boundary line described in the Treaty of 1783—I answer that it was Mitchells map. And to your question, whether by the Long Lake intended by the treaty was meant the Long Lake laid down in Mitchells Map,—I answer, that it was, & that we used no other authority for places named in the description of the boundary line than...
I ought not to have neglected so long to write you an account of the delightful visit I received from M r and M rs Cooledge, M rs C— deserves all the high praises I have constantly heard concerning her, She entertained me with accounts of your sentiments of human life, which accorded so perfectly with mine that it gave me great delight—In one point however I could not agree—she said, she had...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mr Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my subscription for the national Intelligencer I beg your Pardon for not answering immediately your letter of the 24th of last Month as I ought—Not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—Till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant visit—And tendered me the two...
I am honored this Morning with your favour of the 23d.—That Dr. Frankline while in England corresponded with Mr. Dumas, I very well know from an intimate acquaintance with both of them; that he reccommended a Dutch loan before he left England is improbable because at that time there was no Government or body of Men or individual in America to whom the loan could be named. When Dr. Frankline...
I will not envy you but congratulate you on the pleasure you have had in your excursion to Washington But I covet the like pleasure so much that if I could do it with out stirring up an uproar, & hurly burly through the Contenent—Old as I am I would get into my Gig, & bend my course thitherward to morrow morning—. I regret most grievously that you did not Visit Cedar Grove—at Fishkill...
It was not friendly in you to involve me in your domestic & family Controversies Major Pierce Butler told me that he made a voyage to England from S Carolina to ask his fathers consent to marry a Lady, whom he was determined to marry, whether his father consented, or not. And I believe you ask my advice with the same resolution I have seen Fanaticism in all its forms. the fanaticism of honour,...
A friend in need, is a friend indeed; you must certainly have read Shakespear, and have learnt from him, when you have once made a friend, to grapple him to your Soul with hooks of Steeal. You have been constantly grappling me for more than forty years—The newspapers have brought to me your correspondence with Mr. Yates, and that has introduced a correspondence between him and me And what is...
Be pleased to accept my thanks—for an address from the Agricultural Society of the County of Oneida by Alexander Coventry Esqr.— Tho I have not the honour, of knowing, or being known—either to yourself or Mr Coventry I have not the less obligation to both for this favour—I have been more amused with this Address than with any I have ever read upon such occasions—it has laid open sources of...
I have read over the Poem you did me the honour to inclose to me—but a very sudden illness has prevented me from giving that so much attention to it—as I wished—I have perused it however sufficiently to be very ready to give you my advice—In the first place—not to commit it to the flames—In the second place to preserve it with Care—and Continue it till you have Completed your idea—In the third...
Mr Jefferson has been good enough to Send me the enclosed Pamphlet An history of the restoration of Royalty in France 31, March 1814 by De Pradt. As it has Some pretentions to Authority, and as you may not have Seen it, I Send it to you: and as the owner desires me to return it, I pray you after you Shall have read it to transmit it to Monte Chello, with whose Inhabitants I hope you will have...
I admire your checks and bridles which you call maxims. To allude to Bolingbrokes figure, Man is a Noble Animal he is a bucephalus that requires an Alexander to ride him, And I believe he could not, without whip, spurs, and bridle. But of all the whips spurs and bridles, those of the Priests are the most detestable; and those of the Presbyterians are not much better, than those of the...
As the Anecdote of Mr Paine seemes to be have given you some amusement, I will give you another which affords me no Satisfaction upon reflection I was the first person who brought that Wild Man into Notice public notice—his Pamphlet called Common Sense, I thought proved him to be a Smart fellow—and I was informed he was totally distitute of the means of support—and as he had the pen of a ready...
Exoterick and Esoterick Doctrine. See the American Encyclopedia Tit. Exoterick: the French, Title Exoterique; the Dictionaire de Trêvoux, the Same Title, Stephens’s Thesaurus Tit. Exotericus, Gesners Dictionary Tit. Exotericus, and Acroaticus, Fabers Thesaurus Tit. Exotericus. See Also Herodotus Diadorus Siculus, Pausanias Strabo, Plutarch, Aetius , Aristotle Cicero and Aulus Gellius. See also...
I have received your favour of the 5th of August—and the Cheese by Genel Boyd—for both—which I thank you—I have been for four, or five, and thirty years entirely of your opinion—that the United states have not among any Class of Politicians in England, any sincere friends, and those Millions of People who are not politicians, neither know or care, any more about us, than they do about the...
In your favour of the 12th. you Say that you had believed, “that during the War of the Revolution, many Acts of the British had been exaggerated.” This may have happened; but I know not in what instances, on the contrary I know that one half their Cruelties and brutalities had not been told, or if told has not been believed. If you Suppose, that the British were influenced, by “any Motives of...
I have read your narrative, and I cannot scruple to recommend it to the serious, candid and attentive perusal, not only of all who delight in voyages and travels, and all those who love to have their strong passions of pity and terror excited by the artificial means of tragedies and romances, but of all who have leisure, capacity and inclination to read any thing. I should be glad to see a...
I have received the letter you did me the honour to write me on the 18th. I have not yet received your pamphlet but doubt not it is on its way. The great western Canal does honour to the state of N. York and her govenor I sincerely wish & fully believe that the success will equal the grandeur of the conception. Accept my thanks for the Pamphlet though not yet / received & for the politeness of...
Did you send me a pritty address of the President of Columbia College, which I received this Morning. Who is this Revnd. Dr William Staughton, is he a native American, or a foreigner, was he Educated in Rhode Island College, Is he a Baptist, or of what denomination; he appears to me an amiable Man and a good scholar.—He says that Man on his enterance on existence, is unconscious of danger and...
The painful difficulty of holding a pen which has been—growing upon me for many years & now in the middle of the 84th year of my age has become insupportable must be my apology—not only for terminating my Strictures upon your enquiry but for the necessity I am under of borrowing another hand to acknowledge the receipt of your polite & obliging letter of Feb’y 20th. I have never had but one...
I have received your letter of the 24 April & have desired my friend Mr Shaw to subscribe my name to your proposals. I am Sir your very hum Sert MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have received, and read with Avidity and pleasure your Eloquence and Ratiocination, on the great question of Slavery in the Missouri.—I have rarely if ever; meet a Stronger proof of the importance to a Nation of having in her Councils, Men of great Sagacity, and long experience in public affairs—As far as my Memory serves me, the facts you have stated, are perfectly correct—I believe there...
Your Letter of March 21 st I will communicate to Mr Bowditch, and Pickering— You may put my Letters upon the subject of Tracy’s Book into any hands you please, with or without any verbal alterations, as you may think fitt—“what you would have them, make them.” or as James Otis used to say to Samuel Adams—here take it. and “ Quicu Weticu ” it—— I am obliged to borrow the hand of a friend to...
I thank you for your favor of the 22 inst & the two Connecticut gazettes which I have given to Mr. Shaw of the Athenaeum to be communicated to the Historical Society. I had rather read their remarks on the Mohegan letter than make any of my own. It is unpleasant though it is necessary to bring such documents before the public after a concealment of one hundred twenty years. If the Legislature...
No Man could have written from Memory Mr Otis’s Argument of four or five hours against The Acts of Trade as Revenue Laws Writts of Assistants, as a tyrannical Engine to execute them the next day after it was spoken. How awkward then would be an attempt to do it after a lapse of fifty seven years? Nevertheless, Some of the heads of his discourse are So indellibly imprinted on my Mind, that I...
I thank you kindly for sending me Cen the Centinel containing the pieces upon Neutrality signed Marcellus—which I have long been seeking without success—I hope you will be able to lend it to me long enough to get Copied those papers—for no human being knows the value of them so well as I do—not accepting the Author of them himself—. I hope you have not forsaken us—. The time seems very long...
The sight of your well known hand writing in your favour of 25. Feb. last, gave me great pleasure, as it proved your arm to be restored and your pen still manageable—may it continue till you shall become as perfect a calvinist as I am in one particular. Poor Calvins infirmities his rheumatism his gouts and sciatics made him frequently cry out Mon dieu Jusque au quand . Lord how long! Prat once...
I have received your Letter of the 26th. of December 1817 inclosing a Postnote upon the Branch Bank of The United States at Boston for nine hundred and one dollars and Ninety five Cents, being the Amount of the dividend of five per Cent upon the debt proved under the Commission of Bankruptcy of Robert Bird and Co. at New York. I am your affectionate Father MHi : Adams Papers.
I long to hear again from you, having received but one letter, concerning Mr Clarks your own or Susanna Maria’s Health. The Paine of Writing has become to me insupportable. It is with infinite difficulty that I can Say We are all well, that Miss Hall was married on the 26th, that I was at the Ceremony, and that Mr and Mrs Taggart Sat off, for Bergen on the next hour. Kiss the little Cherub for...
I inclose you a National Register, to convince you that the Essex Register is not to blame for printing the Mecklingburg County Resolutions, on the Contrary I think it to be Commended—for if those Resolutions were genuine they ought to be published in every Gazette in the World—If they are one of those tricks which our fashionable Men in England call hoax’es and boares—they ought to be printed...
Of Mr Wait, I know little, but that he was once introduced to me by General Knox, twice by Judge Thatcher, and Last Week by Mr Shaw, all in this House. He has always been represented And Appeared to be a modest discreet and respectable Citizen. There has been So much Huggermugger, about Secret Journals and Files of Congress and Conventions, which I always detested, that I rejoice they are now...
The very great despatch with which you have answered my last not only proves to me that you are desirous of continuing the correspondence of which that letter was the commencement on my part, but requires immediate thanks & accordingly to show you that I shall not be backward in furthering its continuance I hasten to answer you although your letter was but last night recieved & although this...
You made me a rich present when you allowed your son George to spend his vacation with me. He has been to me a companion and a friend. He has indulged in no dissipation, has been very constant to his studies & his reading. I cannot find it in my heart to say that he has indulged a little too much in his segars and in his flute. I see that you have the honour to be the target of all the sharp...
I have rec’d and heard y’r favor of Feb 23d and the pamphlet enclosed, it is a free manly & independent argument at the bar—it is quite orthodox in liberty, humanity, & in law—at least I think so as far as the judges express’d their sentiments—“The court agrees with Dr Graham, in most of the points wh’ he has taken on the subject of examinations & confessions taken in the police office;.” A...
Be pleased to accept my best thanks for your Anniversary discourse before the Lyceum of natural History of New York, the 28th. of Febuary 1820—which I have read with much interest and pleasure— While America possesses such Literary defenders as Verplanck—Walsh—Townsend, she need not dread the malevolence of British Reviewers Journalists or travellers for the more they abuse us, the more...
Was you ever acquainted with Dugald Stuart—before I left France I received a letter from Benjamin Vaughn Esq re in London—Introducing, and recommending in strong terms two Gentlemen from Scotland, one by the name of Dugald Stuart and the other Lord—whose name and title I forgot—as young Gentlemen of great talents and attainments sufficient to deminish our American prejudices against Scotland—I...
I am informed by your Brother G, that you wish to know from me some Account of my Education! The first part of it was under Mr Joseph Cleverly in the public latin School in Braintree, the last part under Mr Joseph Marsh who kept a private Accademy the next door but one to my fathers house. From him I was Sent to Colledge in 1751. Had my first degree of course in 1755. kept th: Latin School in...
I have received your favour of June 24th. but not your “New System of English Grammar”—I therefore cannot make any remarks upon it—the title promises well, every effort to felicitate Education deserves encouragement I therefore wish you abundant success—and am your / most humble and obidient Servant MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
This year compleats a Century Since my Uncle Boylston introduced the practise of Inoculation into the English dominions; but what improvements have been made, Since 1720 partly by experience, but much more by the Accidental discovery of Dr Jenner? The history of this distemper is enough to humble human pride! enough to demontrate what ignorant Puppets We are! how we grope in the dark! and what...
I thank you for your kind Letters I agree with you that we can never be thankful enough for the blessings we enjoy—I congratulate you upon the blessings you enjoy —and the prospects you have in your children and Grand Children—Virtuous children are the greatest comforts, and the greatest Blessings we old people can enjoy— I regret that I cannot write to you oftener As to your project of making...
Some of Jobs afflictions and some of Jobs comforts have prevented my answering your letters, as far as no 30. I hope you will persever in stud y ing Barbaracque. I hope you will critically study his Notes and his quotations in latin and Greek from the Ancients. Endeavour to pick and search out their meaning.— Mr Russells letter and your Fathers remarks are arrived and running the round of...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance, a young Lawyer by the name of Josiah Quincy, and with the title of Coll. being an Aid to our Governor. The name of Coll. Quincy has never I believe been extinct for two hundred years. He is a Son of our excellent Mayor of the City of Boston and possesses a character unstained and irreproachable. I applaud his ambition to visit Monticello and its...
Of making and reading Books, there is no end, And therefore it is hardly worth while to make a begining except for the necessary purposes of common life; I have never been afraid of a Book.—Brand Hollis, my Friend, said to me, there never was a bad book in the World.—Perhaps a Man of Sense and rectitude might learn something from any one; But there are many bad Books, and I have read...
Accept my thanks for your obliging letter of the 25 of last month which I received but yesterday—the Book you mention is not yet arrived—I should be much pleased to see Mr Southwicks address, as I am a friend to every effort to improve the knowledge Virtue and happiness of our laborious Youth— I do not complain, Miss Willard, of the ingratitude of any party because I always endeavoured to be...
I pretend not to preserve any order, in my Letters to you. I give you hints, as they accidently occur to me, which, an hundred years hence, may be considered as Memoires pour Servir a l’histoire des Etas Unis.—I am about to write to you the most melancholly Letter, I ever wrote in my Life. One, which the most deeply touches my Soul with Greif.—And now, I know not where to begin, nor how to...
My Friendship for your family must be my apology for neglecting so long to acknowledge the receipt of your Oration, I presume to reckon among my friends, your Grand Father Mr Chipman of Marble Head—he was a Brother barrester at law, And I spent a week with him in the year 1764 in the same house and at the same Court in Pownalborough and found him an able lawyer, and an amiable Man; though we...
I have recd your favour from Richmond of July 4 I cannot write long letters. When you visit Boston do not forget Quincy the residence of your Ancestors for almost 200 years. Your Grandmother had an elder sister who Married Mr Joshua Bracket and a brother Benjamin. I should be glad to know something of all these for I believe it is twenty years since I have any thing of any of them When you...
My thanks are due to you, and are most joyfully given, for two copies of your Report on Weights and Measures, one of them elegantly bound. Though I cannot say and perhaps shall never be able to say that I have read it, yet I have turned over Leaves of it enough to see that it is a Mass of historical, philosophical chemical mathematical and political knowledge which no Industry in this country...
I thank you for your favour of the 19th and the return of the Pamphlet with a Copy. You revive me when you assure me, that the Original “Principles of the revolution are coming again into fashion: and that foreign feelings are opening giving Way to a national Character” As you are “Zealous to help on the latter,” I Should be happy, if I could, to help you. As doubts and questions are easily...