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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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The information in your last letter, of your return to your garden and your records has given me great pleasure. The records are very interesting, and your translation of them will be an honourable and a durable Monument to your Memory Your friend and my friend Mr Tyng has told you truely that I am “constantly employed” and may add, beyond my Strength of body or mind. Never in my whole life...
I thank you for a very pleasant letter, and I supplicate a continuance of them—I have given up the hopes of seeing the family, or any part of it this Year—but when the Marquis is gone I hope to have letters from your Brother, John, and yourself, which will help to keep up my old spirits a little longer, my heart & wishes and Prayers are with you forever—We have nothing to tell you here but...
In reply to your question, upon what map did the Commissioners trace the boundary line described in the Treaty of 1783—I answer that it was Mitchells map. And to your question, whether by the Long Lake intended by the treaty was meant the Long Lake laid down in Mitchells Map,—I answer, that it was, & that we used no other authority for places named in the description of the boundary line than...
I ought not to have neglected so long to write you an account of the delightful visit I received from M r and M rs Cooledge, M rs C— deserves all the high praises I have constantly heard concerning her, She entertained me with accounts of your sentiments of human life, which accorded so perfectly with mine that it gave me great delight—In one point however I could not agree—she said, she had...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mr Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my subscription for the national Intelligencer I beg your Pardon for not answering immediately your letter of the 24th of last Month as I ought—Not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—Till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant visit—And tendered me the two...
I am honored this Morning with your favour of the 23d.—That Dr. Frankline while in England corresponded with Mr. Dumas, I very well know from an intimate acquaintance with both of them; that he reccommended a Dutch loan before he left England is improbable because at that time there was no Government or body of Men or individual in America to whom the loan could be named. When Dr. Frankline...
I will not envy you but congratulate you on the pleasure you have had in your excursion to Washington But I covet the like pleasure so much that if I could do it with out stirring up an uproar, & hurly burly through the Contenent—Old as I am I would get into my Gig, & bend my course thitherward to morrow morning—. I regret most grievously that you did not Visit Cedar Grove—at Fishkill...
It was not friendly in you to involve me in your domestic & family Controversies Major Pierce Butler told me that he made a voyage to England from S Carolina to ask his fathers consent to marry a Lady, whom he was determined to marry, whether his father consented, or not. And I believe you ask my advice with the same resolution I have seen Fanaticism in all its forms. the fanaticism of honour,...
A friend in need, is a friend indeed; you must certainly have read Shakespear, and have learnt from him, when you have once made a friend, to grapple him to your Soul with hooks of Steeal. You have been constantly grappling me for more than forty years—The newspapers have brought to me your correspondence with Mr. Yates, and that has introduced a correspondence between him and me And what is...
Be pleased to accept my thanks—for an address from the Agricultural Society of the County of Oneida by Alexander Coventry Esqr.— Tho I have not the honour, of knowing, or being known—either to yourself or Mr Coventry I have not the less obligation to both for this favour—I have been more amused with this Address than with any I have ever read upon such occasions—it has laid open sources of...