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“Vanity of Vanities, all is Vanity!” The French have a distinction, between Eulogy and Apology. I know not under which of these heads to class, the following anecdote. Governor Hutchinson, in the plenitude of his Vanity and self sufficiency, thought he could convince all America and all Europe, that the Parliament of Great Britain had an authority supreme, sovereign, absolute and...
Though the publication of my juvenile Letters to your Father, especially in a Nantucket Gazette is a riddle, a mystery beyon d all comprehension; yet as it was impossible for me to Suspect any unkindness in your Family, the friendly Apology in your Letter of the eleventh of this month was unnecessary, though highly gratifying to m e The Letters, while they have afforded some amusement to my...
I am obliged to you for your favour of the 5th. the eleven volumes of your Register, shall be paid to your order in Boston or Baltimore as you please, as soon as I receive, or know where they are in Boston. The 12th & 13th shall be paid for in the same manner Of the destination of my Son I know nothing but by rumour, Whatever may be the determination of government I shall acquire. it is the...
The information you gave me in your favour of the fifth of this month; for which I kindly thank you, has given me great pleasure, as it affords me a hope of once more embracing my Son. I feel a curiosity to know, the “dissenting Voice”; because a Singular Vote, against a multitude, I am always inclined to consider as a violent presumption; both of Integrity, and Fortitude. As I never had the...
Have you read certain Strictures upon Painters and Paintings in the Newspapers? What do you think of them? I am pleased with his gratitude to Copeley, but I believe he was not perfect Master of Copeleys Merit. There is a Portrait of Justice Dana in his Robebands and Tie Wigg of a Barrister at Law, now no doubt in possesion of his Descendants. There is a full Length Portrait of Governor Adams,...
I thank you for your favour of the 3d. and congratulate you on your success; which I hope and believe will be an honourable and a noble Establishment, though it may not be so lucrative as I wish it, for Life There is a coincidence of circumstances which affects me very sensibly. A son of Governor Trumbull so meritorious and so conspicuous a character in the Revolution; an Officer of Rank and...
Can you prescribe rules for painting, a perception? A reminiscens,? a judgment? a ratiocination? Do you think there will ever arise an original Genius who will invent an Art of painting a debate in a Boston Town Meeting, or an Argument at the Bar? It would not be a Wonder, equal to your Jennerian Inoculation! If Such a Phenominon Should appear, I have a Subject to propose to him. The local...
The great question was “Whether Writs of Assistants, were legal, or illegal; constitutional or unconstitutional”? “Writs of Assistants”! You will indignantly say. “What are Writs of Assistants”? “I understand no more about Writs of Assistants, than about ‘ The great question ’.” I believe you; and will endeavour to give you Some hints. When the British Ministry received from general Amherst...
Is your daughter, Mrs Stewart, who I am credibly informed is one of the most accomplished Ladies, a Painter? Are you acquainted with Miss Lydia Smith, who I am also credibly informed is one of he most accomplished Ladies and a Painter? Do you know Mr. Sargent? Do you correspond with your old companion in Arms Colo. John Trumbull? Do you think Fisher will be an historical Painter? Whenever you...
Like other Sinners about to commit an indiscretion I study excuses to quiet my own conscience. My constant veneration for the characters of your father & mother—The respect I feel for the memory of the Baron de Stael who favoured me, my, consort and daughter—with particular marks of his friendly attention, your obliging politeness to my son in Petersburg and Paris—And above all the delight I...
Give me leave to introduce to you, Mr Theodore Lyman junior, a young Gentleman of Education and Travel of modest and virtuous Character, ardent in pursuit of Science and Letters. His Father is respectable in fortune and Connections. Mr Lyman I presume wishes to be acquainted with the Litterateurs as well as to See The King and The Court. He can give you all Our American News, much better than...
Mr Paudlin, transmitted your kind introductory Letter to me from New York, and I presume went to the Southward. Whenever he comes to the Northward I Shall be very glad to receive him. An Architect I am Sure is wanted at Washington. Mr Theodore Lyman junior, Son of a Gentleman of Fortune and Consideration in Boston, will have the Honour to bear this Letter. His Manners are as modest as his...
I am greatly obliged to you for your kind letter of the 10th. of Feb’y, & you cannot be more sensible deeply impressed, than I am with a sense of the great importance of its contents. New England could never be said to have a commanding influence in the counsels of the Union. In times when she has been constantly obliged to make many concessions beyond the bounds of justice to herself, to the...
I have received your obliging favour of the 8th. but cannot consent to your resolution to ask no more questions. Your questions revive my sluggish memory—. Since our national Legislature have established a national Painter, a wise measure for which I thank them, my imagination runs upon the art & has already painted I know not how many historical pictures. I have sent you one give me leave to...
My loving and beloved Friend, Pickering, has been pleased to inform the World that I have “few Friends.” I wanted to whip the rogue, and I had it in my Power, if it had been in my Will to do it, till the blood came. But all my real Friends as I thought them, with Dexter and Gray at their Head insisted “that I Should not Say a Word.” “That nothing that Such a Person could write would do me the...
As I can make no Apology for so long forgetting to return the volumes inclosed, I must, without qualification beg your pardon. This Work, tho’ it bears the name of Condorcet alone was understood to be written in concert between him and his great Patron, the Duke de la Rochefaucoult, as well as the “New Heaven,” and several other publications in favour of a Government in one center genuine...
I thank you for your kind Letter which is received; and for the delicious present which is arrived, and will soon be received.— As every Specimen of improvement in Agriculture and Manufactures, gives me pleasure, the Cultivation of the Cane, is peculiarly delightfull to me.— You Southern Gentlemen have so many advantages over us, that I fear, our good old Mother, New England will be totally...
Mr Theodore Lyman Junr. a Gentleman of a Studious, inquisitive and irreproachable Character, is ardently desirous of seeing Gentlemen of Letters in England. The few, that I had the pleasure to know, excepting One or two, have departed to a World where I hope there are neither Politicks or Wars.— By the information I have received from my Son and Grandson of your remembrance of me, I am...
I have received eleven Volumes of your Register, well bound and in good order, for which I have paid 41.D 75C to Mr Ballard, (according to your order,) and I thank you for the promptitude with which you have obliged me. “Vive la bagatelle” The light Sketch inclosed, is at this day of no value: not even an object of Curiosity, except on account of the critical moment in which it was crayoned,...
You have been kind enough to send me five Numbers of your Allegany Magazine, for which I can only return you my Thanks. It must be a very useful Publication in your Neighbourhood, and there are curious papers preserved in it. I should willingly become one of your Subscribers, but I am already bound by so many Subscriptions and have so many demands for the Subsistence of my Family, that I can...
The Volume of Dr Franklins Correspondence has Seemed to make me live over again my Life at Passy I rejoice that the Public are to have a compleat Edition of his Works, for there is Scarce a Scratch of his Pen that is not worth preserving. I am pleased to See you, at length appearing on the Stage of human Affairs. I presume, upon the Virtue of old Acquaintance to introduce to you Mr Theodore...
A Reminiscence, as the French phrase it, of Civilities received from you and your Brothers, whenever I have met them in France England or America, emboldens, me to introduce to you a Gentleman of Virtuous Character and Worthy Connections. Mr Theodore Lyman Junr of Boston. He is modest, Studious and inquisitive.— I have had this Winter the pleasure of a Visit from your Brother and his Lady, and...
I have received “the history of the late war in the western country by Mr Robert B McAffe” and “the philosophy of human nature by Mr Joseph Buchanan; both of the growth, production, & manufacture of Kentucky.” I rejoice to see literature following the steps of patriotism & heroism, in a region, which since my memory, was a simple wilderness, inhabited only by the children of nature I have...
Mr William Smith Shaw has lent me the fourth Volume of his political pamphlets, the first tract of which is the Controversy between Governor Hutchinson, and the two Houses of the Legislature in 1773 concerning the Souvereign Authority of Parliament over the Colonies. I knew there was such a Pamphlet; but I had not seen it for more than forty Years, and I feared it was lost. I have enquired for...
Lyman was mortified that he could not visit Monticello. He is gone to Europe a Second time. I regret that he did not See you, He would have executed any commission for you in the litterary line, at any pain or any expence. I have many Apprehensions for his health, which is very delicate and precarious. But he is Seized with the Mania of all our young etherial Spirits, for foreign travel. I...
I pretend not to preserve any order, in my Letters to you. I give you hints, as they accidently occur to me, which, an hundred years hence, may be considered as Memoires pour Servir a l’histoire des Etas Unis.—I am about to write to you the most melancholly Letter, I ever wrote in my Life. One, which the most deeply touches my Soul with Greif.—And now, I know not where to begin, nor how to...
I thank you for your favour of the 19th and the return of the Pamphlet with a Copy. You revive me when you assure me, that the Original “Principles of the revolution are coming again into fashion: and that foreign feelings are opening giving Way to a national Character” As you are “Zealous to help on the latter,” I Should be happy, if I could, to help you. As doubts and questions are easily...
Mr Leslie Combs of Kentucky has Sent me “a History of the late War, in the Western Country, by Mr Robert B. McAffee” And “The Phylosophy of Human Nature by Joseph Buchanan.” “The History,” I am glad to See: because it will preserve facts to the honour, and immortal glory of the Western people. Indeed I am not Sorry that “the Phylsophy” has been published, because it has been a Maxim with me...
I have this moment received your favour of yesterday. In some future Letter I must write you an Apology for S. Adams and J. Hancock: which your inherent good nature will not reject. Please to give to your Son the inclosed Inquiston, with / Cordial regards of, We have this Moment the news of J Q A Acceptance, and hopes to embark in all May— MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
That Mr Hutchinson repented, as sincerely as Mr Hamilton did, I doubt not. I hope the Repentance of both has been accepted and their fault pardoned. And I hope I have repented, do repent and shall ever repent of mine and meet them both in an other World, where there will need no Repentance. Such vicissitudes of Fortune command, compassion; I pitty even Napolion. You never profoundly admired Mr...