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    • Adams, John
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I can hardly believe my Eyes when I look upon your letter of the 13th. of October at Philadelphia, and recollect that it has not been acknowledged; and the comfortable intelligence of your safe arrival in that City, ought not to have been so long forgotten: Since that time, we have no intelligence from your family except a letter from Master Charles, to Master Thomas, by which I am happy to...
your Letter has given me great delight Mrs Monroe has done herself great honour, and a durable Service to her Country, by the Example She has Sett by reversing the System of dissipation of her Predecessor. Madam Bingham and the Queen of France are not proper Models for a “Presidante” of the U.S. I most cordially approve of your Plan and that of your husband They wish him to Spend whole Nights...
yours to the 6th. is received, Our Sons of Harvard took leave of us this Morning for Cambridge in good health and Spirits—they arrived here the 16th. somewhat fatigued but very well—Their Uncle is gone to Boston with them to fit them out for Cambridge— I have this Morning learnt the death of my Patriarchal friend William Ellery in his 94th. year—which is a greater age than human Nature can...
Your last journal has so much Philosophy, and Religion, in it—that I am convinced you are a sincere inquirer after truth—God bless and Prosper you in the pursuit.— I am Informed by your Son—my dear Name Sake—that you propose to be here by the first of July—I pray you to be sure—that you arrive hear before that day.—bring your Husband with you—If the President can wander round the Universe and...
My thanks are due to you, for your kind favour of the 27th. of January—I am sorry to hear that you have been so seriously indisposed—I have been myself confined to my House since the 18th. of December, thirty odd days in punctual attendance in Convention; And almost as many luxurious dinners in the best of Company in the World—And as many Visits to Widows, as if I was looking out for another...
Your Journal to the 20th has Sett me on fire. Give my respectfull Compliments to Mr Clay and tell him that I Sincerely Unite with You—in Your request that he would bring in a Bill to Settle the Ettiquette of the United States. The debates in Congress Upon that important Subject, will amuse, divert, instruct and edify me to the End of my Life. I pitty Mrs Monroe; I pitty Mrs H; but above all I...
I am glad to learn from your favour of 25. of May, that you have Seen Mr and Miss Roach. They had Eyes and Ears to perceive the eternal person; but not feelings to Sympathize with the internal Griefs Paines Anxieties Solicitudes and inquietudes within. I will not however complain. No Man had ever more cause of Gratitude. In all the Vicisstudes terrors, Vexations and Perplexities and Agitations...
With high spirits I received the hand writing and the journal of the 1st. of this Month. I opened gay hopes before me for the Winter I rejoice in the recovery of you health, and to hear of the good health of you all— Mr. Adams, his Lady and Son appear to enjoy a serene and patient tranquility under the pelting of this pitiless Storm of political hail the thunder is not loud, and the Lightning...
Your journal ending 13th feb has given me a mixture of allarm and delight, allarm for your health and delight in your reflections. Mr. Jeffersons advice to translate the friendly epistle Don Onis and Mr. Irving into French and send them to Europe made me laugh outright—the expectation from Mr. Madison of a condemnation of his friend Monroe made me smile—but the threat to apply to me to condemn...
One Week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui, which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear, if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly, that the Eyes of all Europe were upon it—And it may be safely said that the Eyes of all Europe, and of all America, North and...