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  • Author

    • Adams, John
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    • Otis, Harrison Gray
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    • post-Madison Presidency
    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Otis, Harrison Gray" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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The amount of my former letters to you is this that all the sovereignty there existing in the nation was in the hands of Alexander Hamilton & that his conduct of it was delirious or in the strong language of my last letter stark mad I am now to justify these conclusions. The manner in which this oligarchical triumvirate was introduced into power is to be explained hereafter; but in the manner...
Ridendo dicere verum quid vetat. Mr. Simon has given us a factitious sketch of the last years of the last Century, and the first years of the present—And why should not I add a few commentary’s, still ridendo, for I cannot review that tragicomico farce, grave as it was to me, without laughing—I was President a mere cipher, the Government was in the hands of an oligarchy consisting of a...
Voltaire at eighty, raved Tradgey; And I fear that you will think that I, at eighty seven and a half, am raving politicks and history. Be it so. but a regard to my own family and above all, to the sacred regard to the honour, the interest and duty of my Country, imperiously, demand of me that I should rave on—I must confess to allude to some former figures, when I was running the gantlet, and...
Since my last letter to you fate, or fortune as Jefferson says, has thrown into my hands two Volumes of amusing Travels, entitled a Journal of a Tour and residence in Great Britain by a Native of France; who it seems has resided a quarter of a Century in America, by the name of Simond.—in page 247. of the first Vol I read as follows.— “ Since 1801. The United States have had a philosophical...
I have received your kind letter of the 12th. march instant—The contents of which are entirely satisfactory to me—Your memory is quite as particular as I could expect any Gentleman of the company to retain, except myself. I must confess I was very s ure on the subject of my mission to France I was attacked by two armies, a french army and an English army—each warring upon me to conquer me into...
I have received your kind letter of the 12 March instant—the contents of which are entirely satisfactory to me. Your memory is quite as particular as I could expect any gentleman of the company to retain except myself. I must confess I was very sore on the subject of my mission to France. I was attacked by two armies—a french army & an English army—each working warring upon me to conquer me...
I think you cannot have entirely forgotten a Conversation at my Table; I had invited a small company of ten or a dozen Gentlemen who had always professed to be my friends, among whom were yourself, Mr. Bayard of Delaware and I think Mr. Sedgwick, It is not necessary to recollect any others It was at the time when I had nominated ambassadors to France a measure which produced a real anarchy in...
The information you gave me in your favour of the fifth of this month; for which I kindly thank you, has given me great pleasure, as it affords me a hope of once more embracing my Son. I feel a curiosity to know, the “dissenting Voice”; because a Singular Vote, against a multitude, I am always inclined to consider as a violent presumption; both of Integrity, and Fortitude. As I never had the...