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  • Author

    • Adams, John
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    • Boylston, Ward Nicholas
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    • post-Madison Presidency
    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Boylston, Ward Nicholas" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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Your favour of the 24th which has just come to hand—has given me so much uneasiness that nothing but the rainy Weather—and the uncertainty of finding you at Roxbury—should prevent me from taking my little Thomas with me in the Chaise—and driving to the Plains to see you—I am so interested in your Health that I shall not cease to be anxious till I hear from your own hand, that you are...
your favour of the 7th from Princeton has given me Comfort by giving me good hopes and full assurance of the Continuence of your Life for Some time—for you must know I have lately become a Convert to your benevolent System of your beneficenceyou remember that I have sometimes laughed at you—for your Bounty’s and Premium’s and Medals, and told you that nobody would thank you for theirs— but the...
I thank you for your favor of the 16th. It is impossible for me, as it was for Junius to recollect the innumerable trifles I have written. of those that were printed in the olden time of the Revolution I believe I could give a list—but nothing I ever printed or wrote in my whole life, is fit for the inspection of Posterity—all written in a hurry distracted with care, dispirited by...
I thank you for your favor of the 16th.—It is impossible for me, as it was for Junius to recollect the innumerable trifles I have written.—Of those that were printed in the Olden Time of the Revolution, I believe I could give a list—but nothing I ever printed or wrote in my whole life is fit for the inspection of Posterity—all written in a hurry distracted with Care, dispirited by...
I think it is Voltaire who some where says, the life of a Man of Letters ought to appear only in his writings, without any pretentions to the Character of a Man of letters—it has been my destiney to scribble a great deal—always in great haste, never revising or correcting any-thing—You desire a list of my publications—and I have given you incouragement to expect it—but I shall be accused of...
The Emperiour of China quoted the precept of Confucius, give much, and take but little—but you have adopted another maxim, give much, and take nothing—for I have nothing to give—but I am too proud to receive so much with all the gratitude that is due without returning any-thing—Here is a Box of Cegars which I have not dared to open though I suppose they are as odoriferous as an incensoir of a...
Thanks, dear Cousin, for yours of the 10th. and thanks again for the Box of perfumes. My daughter Louisa wishes me to go to Washington—my Grand-daughter Caroline wants me to come to Fishkill—and you write me to the top of the Skye striking Wachusetts—but you know not what you ask—probably nothing less than the trouble of bringing me back in a box.—Cordial thanks for your offer of a...
I have two kind letters from you to answer—the last—of August 7th.—has filled me with deep sorrow and affliction. I am afraid you are not so careful of your health as you ought to be. I pray you to do every thing in your power to preserve it, for it is very interesting to me and mine—and let me add, without flattery, to the public. The misnomer, an error currente calamo—needed no correction,...
I have been as Civil to Mr Lane who brought me your letter of August 26th. as I could, he dined with me, and I was much pleased with him—I am sincerely grieved at your long confinement and continued indisposition, what can I do to restore your health—If you come to the Convention as I hope you will—That I think will cure you—for wrangling and Contention exhilirates the Spirits, and Animates...
O that I had the talent at description of a Homer a Milton or a Walter Scott I would give you a picture of a hill that I have visited with more pleasure than I should mount Ida or Monticello. Mr David Hyslop has been importuning me for seven years to dine with him in Brookline: I have always declined till last Tuesday when taking my grandson George Washington Adams for my guide and aid de camp...