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  • Author

    • Adams, John
  • Recipient

    • Boylston, Ward Nicholas
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    • post-Madison Presidency
    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Boylston, Ward Nicholas" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I rejoice that you have arrived safely at Princeton where may your health be perfectly restored—my kind regards to Mrs Boylston and to the young family—I am labouring & sorrowing according to the oracle and for nothing more than I know of than my distance from you—We go on here in a dull round—no news of any kind that is worth repeating. I am in a kind of solitary imprisonment to which I...
A thousand thanks to my ever dear Cousin, for his unbounded benevolence to me. The barrel of cider will last three of my lives, & the wine I presume is excellent for your wine is always Superlative. I am rejoiced that you and Mrs B are convalescent. George has done his duty in waiting upon you, and I hope he will do so as long as you live—Your kind and thankful friend Miss Smith sends her...
My anxiety for you is greater than, that for myself, I long to know the state of your Health, and I cannot longer forbare to send and enquire after it. my love to Mrs. Boylston, and Prayers for your health, and comfort—from your affectionate friend / and Cousin MHi : Boylston Family Papers.
I am suffering under a bitter repentance in neglecting to write & thank you for your last kind letter & for the valuable present of Cider whose only fault is that too good I am obliged to mix more than half water with it— I begin to look forward with great delight to the prospect of your return to Roxbury with Mrs Boylston, hoping that you both will come and see me before I go hence, to be...
Is not your lively imagination a little exalted, you certainly have exalted my name to a greater height than it would ever have arisen to, without your sublime compliment—I presume you have laid aside the thought of building an Hospital for despair on that height—I am sure my name ought not be associated with despair How I long to make you a visit, but I cannot get out of my Chamber yet, here...
I still breathe in great weakness, but in my latest breath I shall wish for your health and prosperity and that of all your family. As to giving you advice concerning your concerns at Harvard University—I am utterly incapable of it. The conduct of that beloved and venerated Seminary is too refined and sublime for my dullness to comprehend. I presume not to censure any of its acts, though some...
I owe you a letter, but have not been able, and am not still able to acknowledge it—I am very low, but low as I am, I feel a longing to take a ride with you up your new road—to the top of Boylston Hill—Alias Waychusetts—But I might as reasonably wish to fly on a sunbeam to sirius the dog-star Our public affairs in this state go on pritty well but I am sorry for one event, the removal of Mr....
I have received two kind letters from you not yet answered. Mr Curtis sent me the fish which I found very fine & I beg that you would not give yourself the trouble of sending me any such delicacies for I am not and never was much of an epicure. And now all kinds of food are much alike to me—my own beef & mutton are the best for me. My health about which you seem to be anxious would be best...
I will not loose a second before acknowledgeing your favour of the 21st. which I received this minute—I wish I could send you a Copy of all the papers, that is the Deeds by which I have given to the Town of Quincy one hundred and sixty five Acres of Land. And my Library. For the purpose of building a Stone Temple, and a Stone Academy, that Academy to be built over the Cellar of the House in...
Badinage Avaunt!!! I must now be very serious. I have recollected all I can of Homer Virgil and Shakespear—for you know I can read neither and I can recollect nothing comparable to your idea of a stone edifice on the top of Waychusetts Hill as an asylum for men and women in despair—it is in Milton only that I can find any thing approaching it, in sublimity. In humanity it has no competitor...
Some of Jobs afflictions and some peculiar to myself have rendered it impossible for me to write to you even a bare acknowledgement of the favours I have received from you. The first & greatest of which is the Extract from Mr Nichols. The manly sense pure integrity & noble disinterestedness of that worthy gentleman always charms me. After such a treat it seems a sin & a shame to mention such...
Not a word at present about your delicious Cider and flounders. Miss Farnam a Grand Daughter of my Ancient acquaintance of Sixty years standing and brother barrister at Law with whom I have rode many a painful Circuit Mr Farnham of Newbury port, is a bout to remove to Princetown, in the Character of a school mistress, and is to reside in the family of Mr Clark your Revnd Pastor, her Aunt Mrs...
Though my visit to Princetown formes an Era in my Life, and afforded me as much pleasure as my nature, and state was capable of—And though I look upon every step of its progress with delight St Anthony who was as persecuting a saint as any in the Callendar took advantage of it to stir up his fires subterranean fires, and sent a violent inflamation into my eyes and face, which has prevented my...
Although I have not been able to acknowledge your kind letter, I have not been less grateful for it nor less delighted with the exuberance of the productions of your agriculture. My little hills too have been tolerably fruitful but they are mole hills in comparison with your mountains. I long to look down upon my hillocks from your lofty heights but all such delights are forbidden to and...
It flatters me to find that from your lofty elevation, so near the summit of your Wachusett you sometimes look down upon our three blue hills and even over my montezillo all of which are Molehills in comparison with your superb high places. Can you see the Boylston hill in Brookline? Your barns have been seen from that enchanting spot. I look with longing eyes from one of my montezillo’s at...
Mr Greanleaf and his Colleague in our Quincy Town Meeting thoght fitt to recommend all the Amendments, not as passed, but as the best that could be obtaind. I Said a few Words upon Some of the Articles and referred to my honourable Colleague to explain the reasons more at large. Peter Boylston Adams my Brother got together two or three Octogenarians half deaf though not half blind like him...
I have received your kind note of this afternoon. Mr De Wint and his family are all in Boston and are engaged there till next Saturday. It is utterly impossible for me to wait upon you in the present state of my health; nor in any case can I go with such an army as you have invited. All the strength nature has left me is not sufficient to endure it. Your kindness overwhelms me. My son said to...
I revoke the appellation of Son—Your conduct to me is more like that of a tender affectionate partial and too indulgent a Father—than like that of a Cousin, or a Brother or a Son You overwhelm me so with your kindness that I have no expressions adequate to my sense of obligations I have received the two Barrels of Cider, and the Bottles of Wine which I shall reserve for the best use of which...
I have been as Civil to Mr Lane who brought me your letter of 26. As I could. He dined with me and I was much pleased with him— I am sincerely grieved at your long continued indisposition, What can I do to restore your health—If you come to the Convention, as I hope you will; That I think will Cure you—For wrangling and Contention exhilarates the Spirits and Animates the Body—You will have...
O that I had the talent at discription, of a Homer a Milton or a Walter Scot—I would give you a Picture of all that I have Visited—with more pleasure than I should Mount Irea or Monticello—Mr David Hyslop has been importuning me for seven years to dine with him in Brookline—I have always declined, till last Wednesday—when taking my Grand Son George Washington Adams for my guide, and aid de...
O that I had the talent at description of a Homer a Milton or a Walter Scott I would give you a picture of a hill that I have visited with more pleasure than I should mount Ida or Monticello. Mr David Hyslop has been importuning me for seven years to dine with him in Brookline: I have always declined till last Tuesday when taking my grandson George Washington Adams for my guide and aid de camp...
I have been as Civil to Mr Lane who brought me your letter of August 26th. as I could, he dined with me, and I was much pleased with him—I am sincerely grieved at your long confinement and continued indisposition, what can I do to restore your health—If you come to the Convention as I hope you will—That I think will cure you—for wrangling and Contention exhilirates the Spirits, and Animates...
I have two kind letters from you to answer—the last—of August 7th.—has filled me with deep sorrow and affliction. I am afraid you are not so careful of your health as you ought to be. I pray you to do every thing in your power to preserve it, for it is very interesting to me and mine—and let me add, without flattery, to the public. The misnomer, an error currente calamo—needed no correction,...
Thanks, dear Cousin, for yours of the 10th. and thanks again for the Box of perfumes. My daughter Louisa wishes me to go to Washington—my Grand-daughter Caroline wants me to come to Fishkill—and you write me to the top of the Skye striking Wachusetts—but you know not what you ask—probably nothing less than the trouble of bringing me back in a box.—Cordial thanks for your offer of a...
The Emperiour of China quoted the precept of Confucius, give much, and take but little—but you have adopted another maxim, give much, and take nothing—for I have nothing to give—but I am too proud to receive so much with all the gratitude that is due without returning any-thing—Here is a Box of Cegars which I have not dared to open though I suppose they are as odoriferous as an incensoir of a...
I think it is Voltaire who some where says, the life of a Man of Letters ought to appear only in his writings, without any pretentions to the Character of a Man of letters—it has been my destiney to scribble a great deal—always in great haste, never revising or correcting any-thing—You desire a list of my publications—and I have given you incouragement to expect it—but I shall be accused of...
I thank you for your favor of the 16th.—It is impossible for me, as it was for Junius to recollect the innumerable trifles I have written.—Of those that were printed in the Olden Time of the Revolution, I believe I could give a list—but nothing I ever printed or wrote in my whole life is fit for the inspection of Posterity—all written in a hurry distracted with Care, dispirited by...
I thank you for your favor of the 16th. It is impossible for me, as it was for Junius to recollect the innumerable trifles I have written. of those that were printed in the olden time of the Revolution I believe I could give a list—but nothing I ever printed or wrote in my whole life, is fit for the inspection of Posterity—all written in a hurry distracted with care, dispirited by...
your favour of the 7th from Princeton has given me Comfort by giving me good hopes and full assurance of the Continuence of your Life for Some time—for you must know I have lately become a Convert to your benevolent System of your beneficenceyou remember that I have sometimes laughed at you—for your Bounty’s and Premium’s and Medals, and told you that nobody would thank you for theirs— but the...
Your favour of the 24th which has just come to hand—has given me so much uneasiness that nothing but the rainy Weather—and the uncertainty of finding you at Roxbury—should prevent me from taking my little Thomas with me in the Chaise—and driving to the Plains to see you—I am so interested in your Health that I shall not cease to be anxious till I hear from your own hand, that you are...