You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, John Quincy

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy"
Results 3101-3150 of 3,633 sorted by recipient
310114th. (Adams Papers)
Marquis de la Fayette and his Lady, Count and Countess d’Ouradou the Abbés de Chalût and Arnoux dined with us. M: d’Ouradou, is a french nobleman, of Auvergne who possessed a very considerable estate, but has lately been almost ruined, by the loss of a lawsuit, which after he had gained twice, was finally, unjustly decided against him: Moliere says somewhere, with great truth: nothing is so...
3102[July 1783] (Adams Papers)
Je fus à Delft avec Monsr. Fitch et sa compagnie, qui partent pour L’Angleterre. Most likely Eliphalet Fitch, a native Bostonian, reputedly very rich, who may have held a crown office in Jamaica, and whom JA described to JQA as a grandson of Dr. Thomas Boylston “and consequently your Relation” ( JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and...
310329th. (Adams Papers)
Club at Thompson’s this evening. Putnam inform’d us, he must leave us at a quarter before nine. I told him he must make no appointments for Thursday evenings. It was no appointment he said; but he was under an indispensible obligation to write a letter this evening: accordingly he left us. At nine we likewise came away. I took a walk with Stacey in high street, with the expectation of meeting...
3104[October 1783] (Adams Papers)
Diné chéz M: l’Abbé de Chalut. Left Auteuil, with my Father, for London, at about 9 o’clock in the morning; rode 9 ½ posts as far as St. Just and stopp’d for the night. We dined at Chantilly. First entry in D/JQA/9, which covers the period 20 Oct.–6 Dec., but lacks entries for 27 Oct.; 5, 19, 22, 27–28 Nov.; and 3–4 Dec. This Diary booklet, measuring approximately 4½″ × 7¼″, consists of nine...
3105Tuesday January 1st. 1788. (Adams Papers)
Pass’d the day and evening at the office. Read at my own lodgings till one o’clock in the morning. I feel every day a greater disposition to drop this nonsense. It takes up a great deal of my time, and as it is incessantly calling upon me, I can never have any respite: in the extreme cold of winter I have no convenience, for writing, and was it not for the pleasure of complaining to myself, I...
310619th. (Adams Papers)
The Stage was full from Portsmouth and consequently I could not obtain a seat. I could not think of waiting till Saturday with a chance of being again disappointed. So I sent forward my little trunk by the Stage, and engaged a horse; at about ten in the forenoon, I left Town, and arrived at Ipswich just before noon. The Supreme Court are sitting there, and I went to the Court house where I saw...
3107Saturday 23d. (Adams Papers)
Went to Pappa’s house, stay’d there till about half after eight O clock and then we went back to the school.
3108[August 1784] (Adams Papers)
Left London, travelled to Sittingbourne. 43. miles. In the latter part of Dec. 1783, JA and JQA traveled from London to Bath via Oxford, but were unable to remain long at the famous spa because of the unsettling news that the Dutch loan which JA had obtained the previous summer had been overdrawn. Although JA ’s health had improved little during his short stay in England, he and JQA left...
310919th. (Adams Papers)
We arrived at Drolhetta at about 5. o’clock this afternoon, but at the last post we were obliged to leave our carriage on account of the quantity of Snow, and take Slays.
31109th. (Adams Papers)
Doctor Leonard came here in the morning: this gentleman came as a passenger with Callahan. He underwent a violent prosecution two or three years ago in England, for endeavouring to come to America with some models of manufacturing machines. But after being two years in prison he was released and immediately resumed his original intentions; but he is now come over without his models; and he...
311123d. (Adams Papers)
A second lighter came up this day with things from the ship. We were very busy in unpacking during the whole day. A bed was set up in the house in which I lodg’d, but we have done sufficient to make a great deal of work before we get at rights. There is yet a great deal to be done to the house. When I came from Newbury-Port, I intended to have studied as much here as I should have done there;...
Last evening at about 10 o’clock I went to a Mascarade Ball which we had in Town. As it was but the second that has ever been given in this place it was not very brilliant And the masks were almost all the same; the men dressed in sailors, and the women in Country girls almost universally, but it was very well for a beginning. I stay’d there till about 4. o’clock this morning, when I return’d...
31134. (Adams Papers)
Dined at Mr. Hartley’s.
311429th. (Adams Papers)
I went this evening with Bridge, and pass’d half an hour at Mr. Wigglesworth’s. Ned is very ill of a pleurisy fever, and Peggy looks low spirited. The Professor has been all along, and still is much opposed to a private Commencement, and when he has once adopted an opinion, I believe it would require supernatural powers to convince him that it is erroneous. Dr. Jennison had one or two square...
311523d. (Adams Papers)
We dined at Mr. Williamson’s; a merchant of this place; in the evening we went to the assembly where we stay’d till about 1 o’clock in the morning, very stormy windy weather the greatest part of the day.
311613th. (Adams Papers)
Weather still extremely warm. I heard Parson Wibird. Mr. Q. Thaxter was at meeting in the forenoon; and went and dined with us. In the afternoon, Madam, went down to my Uncle Quincy’s, and I drank tea with my brothers at my Uncle Adams’s. And we bath’d at the creek in the evening. JQA notes, in his line-a-day entry, “Parson Wibird all day,” presumably referring to his attendance at meeting in...
3117Thursday 30th. (Adams Papers)
This morning we all got up at 3 o clock but did not set out till 7. We went over several mountains. At about two o clock we stopt and dined at a little cottage by the Side of a River which is call’d Carasedo and from thence we proceeded on as far as a little village call’d Galiego Gallegos where we shall lodge this night. This is the best house we have Lodged at since we Left Corunna. We have...
311819th. (Adams Papers)
Between 10 and 11 this morning I set off with Vose and Lloyd, and Clark, and arrived at Plymouth, before 2 in the afternoon. We found Sever and Henry Warren as soon as we arrived, and dined with them at a Mr. Russells; I paid a visit to Mrs. Thomas, and pass’d the afternoon at Warren’s chamber. We drank tea at Mr. Russell’s: he has two fine Sisters; one of them remarkably handsome. After tea...
311916th. (Adams Papers)
I finished the second volume of Blackstone, and began upon the third which treats of private wrongs. And this evening I got through Buffon’s natural history of man, which is still more entertaining than the theory of the earth.
312015th. Saturd. (Adams Papers)
Having left Helsingborg this morning at about 10’ o’clock, we pass’d the Sound and at about 11. we arriv’d at Elseneur Helsingör which is the first Danish town. We stay’d there about 2 hours to refresh ourselves and have our trunks examined and set out from there at about 1’ o’clock afternoon, and arrived at Copenhagen at about 7. o’clock. Copenhagen is distant from Elseneur 5 German Miles; we...
31213d. (Adams Papers)
I heard Mr. Andrews preach. About as long as he was last Sunday. I think he is gaining ground in the parish. And am in hopes that he may be finally settled, without much opposition. Which would greatly disappoint some flaming zealots, who like all zealots justify unworthy means by the sanctity of the end. I walk’d in the beginning of the evening with Stacey: and af­ terwards called at Mrs....
31229th. (Adams Papers)
Mr. Wigglesworth gave a private lecture this morning, and we had likewise a philosophical lecture from Mr. Williams; the sub­ ject was fire; and there were a number of curious observations, which, I do not recollect having heard last year: Charles pass’d part of the evening with me, at my chamber. Moses Little of Newbury, will be 21 the 4th. of next July. Great application, joined to very good...
31236th. (Adams Papers)
Spent the evening with Thompson and Little, at Putnam’s lodgings. We conversed upon a diversity of subjects. Law, Physic, History, poetry, religion and politics, by turns engaged our attention. These meetings renew the recollection of those happy scenes, which we have all gone through in college; and in this manner, I now pass some of my most agreeable hours. But after I came home this...
312423d. (Adams Papers)
Rambling about with my gun all the forenoon; but with little success: went and dined at my uncle Quincy’s and pass’d the afternoon there: when I return’d I found Mrs. Warren, had been at Mr. Cranch’s; with her Son. Weather very dry.
312520th. (Adams Papers)
Proceed slowly in the third volume of Blackstone. As this is the most important author of all those that will occur, I make large extracts from him, which takes me up so much time that I cannot read above twenty or thirty pages in a day. Townsend pass’d the evening at my lodgings. Dull weather. This afternoon there was a town-meeting for the purpose of choosing members to represent this Town...
3126Aug. 15th. Friday. (Adams Papers)
This day I dined at Passy at Dr. Franklin’s with a numerous Company. In the evening I went to the Comedy at the Bois de Boulogne. Beverlei and le Français a Londres were the plays represented. Beverlei is what the French call a Tragedie bourgeoise , as Barnwell in English. The Subject of it is, a Man addicted to gaming, who ruins himself by it, or rather is ruined by a villain who pretends to...
312713th. (Adams Papers)
The storm continued violent through the whole day. The rain pour’d down, with as much force, as if there had not fallen a drop before. I felt dizzy in the head, and therefore did not attend meeting: in the evening at half past eight we met by adjournment from last night, at Fiske’s chamber; we finally concluded, the business which we met upon by the expulsion of the person, who had betray’d...
312810th. (Adams Papers)
This forenoon Townsend, sat off for Boston. Mr. Parsons intended to have gone likewise, as the supreme Court, sits by adjournment, there this week. But he was so much troubled with an ague in his face, and the tooth ach, that he could not go. I pass’d the evening with Little at Dr. Swett’s. Mrs. Swett is a pretty woman; and agreeable: not endow’d I believe with great strength of mind; not much...
312919th. (Adams Papers)
Drizzling, misty weather all day. Did not stir out of the house. Amused myself with reading, writing, and taking lessons on the flute; which I have lately begun to learn.
313016th. (Adams Papers)
The weather begins to grow very cold: it has been remarkably fine all this fall. Mrs. Cranch return’d from Mystic, and will pass the night at Mrs. Hilliard’s. Mr. Williams gave us in the evening a view at Jupiter, through the telescope. He appears like the moon when full, and attended with his four Satellites, at different distances. They are quite bright though invisible to the naked eye....
31313d. (Adams Papers)
Attended meeting in the forenoon. Sacrament day: I went to dine at Judge Dana’s: soon after I got there, he was taken ill, and thought it was with his old disorder. He sent immediately to Boston, for Doctor Lloyd, and Dr. Danforth; and for Dr. Jennison at College. We rubb’d him with a flesh brush, and with blankets, for two hours without intermission: he recover’d and the Physicians supposed...
313228th. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
This forenoon I went with Mr. D. to the Hotel of the Marquis de Verac, and from thence to that of the dutch Ambassador with the Marquis, but he was not at home; dined at the Marquis de Verac’s: Mr. Artaud supped out. Fine weather. Willem Lodewijk (Baron) van Wassenaer Starrenburg , minister plenipotentiary and ambassador extraordinary plenipotentiary to St. Petersburg, 1780–1785 ( Repertorium...
3133Aug. 22d. Friday. (Adams Papers)
This forenoon at 11 o’clock, I went, in Company with My Lord Ancram, Mr. Stewart and my father to see the Academy of the Abbe L’epée, who has undertaken to teach, people born deaf and dumb, not only to converse with one another very fluently, but also, to read and write, and he has succeeded entirely. It is astonishing to see how fast and how easily they make themselves understood, to one...
31349th. (Adams Papers)
We had this afternoon a public Lecture upon Divinity. It is a pretty common Custom among the Students, to take their books into the Chapel, and whilst these Lectures are going on they study their next Lessons; those indeed, that do this, are some of the good Scholars of the Class, for there are many, that do not look, into a book, more than once a Quarter, before they go in to recite. Lovell,...
31356th. (Adams Papers)
The Weather fair, but the Snow, which drifted a great deal, is in some places so deep, that it is impossible to get through it. We danced in the club this evening at Foster’s chamber.
313618th. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
In the forenoon Mr. D. went and took a ride. Cloudy weather. Thermometer 20 degrees above.0. Stay’d at home all day. Mr. Wolff came to see Mr. D.
313723d. (Adams Papers)
Heard old Parson Wibird, preach from Luke. XIX. 10. For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost. Mr. Cranch said he had heard it ten Times before. No one would complain if the Parson would read printed Sermons, But to hear one thing continually repeated over which does not deserve, perhaps, to be said more than once, is very fatiguing. We had the Pleasure of Mr. Tyler’s...
3138[September 1788] (Adams Papers)
Rain. Pass’d the evening with Stacey. Finished Hume and Blackstone. Little &c. I went over the river with Stacey and Romain upon a shooting party. We had tolerable success. It was very windy; and with a heavy boat and only one oar, we had some difficulty to get across the river. Bridge arrived this day in town. I proposed to him to go with me to-morrow: and he has partly promised to accept my...
313920th. (Adams Papers)
Snow’d almost all day. White set out early in the morning for Haverhill; his sister is to be married to-morrow. The Class recite to Mr. Burr, this week. I did not attend this morning. Mr. Pearson, gave a lecture, upon the analogy between philosophical grammar, and the human body. His divisions of Sentences, are those of Harris. Sentences of assertion and volition. Mr. Williams gave a lecture...
31406th. (Adams Papers)
Visited young Mr. Chaumont in the morning, who arrived a few days since from Philadelphia. I went with him to introduce him to the delegates from Massachusetts but they were gone upon Long Island, and are not expected back untill Monday. Dined at the president’s in Company with Coll. Cropper from Virginia. In the afternoon Mr. Harrison went to accompany the Ladies, an employment of which he...
31418th. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
Went in the forenoon and took a walk. Mr. D. went out in the afternoon. Went and walked in the garden in the evening. Fine weather.
314213th. (Adams Papers)
No reciting, this morning: was employ’d all day in mathematical Studies, of which I begin to grow exceeding fond. After dinner, I had Bridge, Kendall, Little and Sever about an hour at my Chamber. Bridge, and Little are two of the best Scholars in our Class, and moreover very clever fellows. Sever has a strong natural genious, and genuine Wit. But his morals are loose, and he is not by any...
314310th. (Adams Papers)
The weather cleared up this morning; but the wind was so high, and the snow so deep; that Mr. Hilliard could not get out to meeting. The breakfast club were at my chamber, in the morn­ ing; and at noon we all went down and dined at Bradish’s. We pass’d the afternoon, and supp’d there. Bridge, and I, made an attempt to go down to Professor Wiggles worth’s in the evening, but the snow was so...
314422d. Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
This day a french Gentleman dined with us. Mr. D went and took a walk in the forenoon. Mr. Artaud went in the afternoon to the Clubb. Cloudy weather.
314510th. (Adams Papers)
In the forenoon I went, and sat about an hour with Mr. King. Mr. Gerry was sitting at the grand Committee of Congress in the City Hall. I left 50 french louis d’ors, which Mr. Gerry wishes to have for bank Bills on Boston. Dined at the Presidents in a large Company, Mr. van Berkel, Mr. Jay, Mr. Paine, Dr. Gordon, Dr. Witherspoon, &c. After Dinner young Mr. van Berkel, and Major L’Enfant, went...
31463d. (Adams Papers)
We had a Lecture this morning upon Electricity; we received two small shocks, which however, gave me such a stroke in the joints at my elbows that I could not write after it; The weather very warm indeed. Fahrenheits’ thermometer I am told was at 87: 80 is the common summer heat. We did not recite in Doddridge, this morning.
314712th. Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
Receiv’d the news of a battle between the french and English fleets in the West Indies. Went to the shops with Mr. Artaud before dinner. Went in the evening with Mr. D. and Mr. Artaud to the concert. After the concert we walked in the garden. Cloudy weather. The battle off Les Saintes, a small group of islands between Guadeloupe and Dominica, which took place 9–12 April 1782 and set Adm....
31484th. (Adams Papers)
Old Mr. Grand, and Dr. Bancroft. In the evening Mr. Chaumont and Mr. Franklin. Dr. Edward Bancroft , physician, scientist, and writer, Franklin’s confidential associate, and double agent during the Revolution ( JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:71–72 ; Julian Boyd, “Silas Deane: Death by a Kindly...
31492d. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
In the afternoon went with Mr. Artaud to Mr. Rimbert’s and to the Shops. Mr. D. went to Mr. Wolff’s. Variable weather.
315025th. (Adams Papers)
Thayer and Charles returned from Scituate this afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard came to pass the night here. Mr. H appears much more to advantage in private conversation than he does in the pulpit. He appears to be a very sensible man.