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You will imagine that the place from which I now write you has been thus named by us; but so it was not—We found the names already settled—Ealing is a parish in the immediate neighbourhood of Brentford, that “town of mud”—immortalized in the Poetry of Pope and Swift; and the house in which we reside has been thus named by its proprietor, in honour of a kinsman of his, one Lord Boston, who has...
227th. (Adams Papers)
No reciting this morning. I was employed all day in studying mathematics, which are the most pleasing to me, of any of our studies. Spent, a couple of hours at Bridge’s chamber after dinner. Rain in the Evening.
324th. (Adams Papers)
Snow’d all night, and this forenoon. I attended meeting all day: Mr. Hilliard preached, but not in his best way. The meeting was very thin. It cleared up this afternoon, and the evening is very cold.
411th. (Adams Papers)
This day completes my twentieth year: and yet I am good for nothing, and cannot even carry myself forward in the world: three long years I have yet to study in order to qualify myself for business: and then—oh! and then; how many more years, to plod along, mechanically, if I should live; before I shall really get into the world? Grant me patience ye powers! for I sicken, at the very idea: thus...
We received your short Letter of 19 November written just as the pilot from the mouth of the Elbe was about to leave you. Since that time untill this day we have had almost incessantly Easterly winds blowing, & we hope that you enjoyed the benefit of them, & long before this find yourself restored to the bosom of our Country & friends. Since your departure several circumstances have occurred...
624th. (Adams Papers)
One of the breast plates was broke, and we were obliged to send it a mile and half to be mended this morning, before we could proceed on our journey; so it was past eight when we left our tavern. Before one, we came to a very good inn: the best I think, that we have found on the road except Mr. Hall’s. We had come 16 miles without stopping, and therefore we concluded to dine there. Between 3...
717th. (Adams Papers)
This day, the Bridge over Charlestown Ferry was compleated, and as the same day 11 years agone, was mark’d at Charlestown, with dreadful Scenes, of Slaughter and Destruction, the managers, and directors of the Bridge, determined, that this day should be mark’d with Pleasure and festivity. I do not think however that the scheme, was good. A Dinner was provided for 600 People, on Bunker’s hill:...
831st. (Adams Papers)
A cold north-east storm. Reading and writing all day. Wrote a letter to my mother, and one to my Sister. Read some pages in Bolingbroke’s philosophical works: the stile and matter both inferior to his political writings. JQA to AA , 1 Aug. ( Adams Papers ); his letter to AA2 has not been found.
926th. Wednesday. (Adams Papers)
Stay’d at home all day. Mr. Artaud dined at Mr. Rimbert’s. In the afternoon Mr. D. went and took a ride.
I have for many Months made it a rule, to enclose to you a Newspaper, every week, and I have intended that it never should be without at least one Letter, from myself or some one of the family, to you or my Mother—I believe this intention has never entirely failed; but it has not always been possible for me to write, myself—The reasons of this are so well known to you, that I hope they will...
1131st. (Adams Papers)
Election day. This is a day of great festivity throughout the Country. The last Wednesday in May, is appointed, for declaring the choice, of the Governor, Lieutt. Governor &c. It is the only day in the year, in which the Student here is left at his Liberty to do whatever he pleases; and it is most frequently the Case, as it has been this day, that one Party is playing in the yard from 8 in the...
1230th. (Adams Papers)
Mr. A. met Mr. Jefferson, at Paris, in the forenoon. 31 The Marquis de la Fayette was here in the evening. He appears very well satisfied with his last voyage to America.
1314th. (Adams Papers)
Dined at Lincoln, and immediately after dinner we again proceeded on our journey and by 5 o’clock, got to Cambridge, which is 12 miles: we came through Concord , and Lexington which 12 years ago were of no note, but which have been since rendered ever memorable, by being the place, where the first martyrs in the glorious cause of American Liberty, bled, (April 19th. 1775). Posterity will...
Last week I sent you a number of the Monthly Theological Repository, containing some Speculations of Mr Van der Kemp and Mr Jefferson—With this Letter I enclose to my Father the numbers just published of the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews—Presuming that you know the History and Character of those Publications from Cobbett, you will sufficiently understand them to be in the Nature of Lawyer’s...
1516th. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Stay’d at home all day. Mr. D. went to the court Comedy to see a Russian play. Stormy windy weather.
1621st. (Adams Papers)
This day the Seniors leave, College; there is no recitation in the morning, and prayers are deferred till 10 o’clock. The Class then went down in procession two by two, with the Poet at their head, and escorted the President to the Chapel. The President made a very long prayer, in which in addition to what he commonly says he pray’d a great deal for the Seniors: but I think he ought to get his...
1711th. (Adams Papers)
Paris Afternoon. Coll. Humphreys and Mr. Short, went with us to see Astley’s equestrian exercises which, may be seen once or twice with pleasure, but which are tiresome, to one who has seen them as often as I have. Astley exhibits from October till february in Paris, and the rest of the year in London. His Amphitheatre here, is generally very full: he might make a very large fortune, but...
184th. (Adams Papers)
I began this day to translate the Eclogues of Virgil. What a difference between this Study, and that of a dry barren greek Grammar. But without sowing the grain there certainly can be no harvest, and there is no Rose, without a thorn. I have been invited to several places, but as yet have had to plead, as an excuse, that my trunks are not come, and I have no Clothes to appear decently in....
1930th. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
In the forenoon Mr. D went to Mr. Wolff’s. In the afternoon I went and took a ride with him. Fine weather. In the margin: “Mrs. B. brought to bed.”
206th. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Stay’d at home all day. Mr. D rode out in the afternoon. Pretty good weather.
Doctor Johnson somewhere says that a short letter to a distant friend is a sort of insult; but I hope you will not be of that opinion—I know however that it is an unpleasant disappointment, after having your expectations raised by the sight of a distant friend’s superscription and seal, to find them only for a duplicate, or a letter to a third person; and I therefore add a few lines, on...
2220th. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
This forenoon Mr. Wolff came to see Mr. D. Mr. D. went and took a ride in the afternoon. I went with Mr. Artaud to the shops. Mr. Artaud went into the country. Clear weather, but windy.
23Saturday July 1st. 1786. (Adams Papers)
The military company, having obtained a promise of 60 stand of arms, met immediately after Dinner, and chose their officers, and agreed to a Code of Laws. They were upon the business more than two hours. Vose, was chosen Captain, Fiske, and Packard lieutenants, and Chandler 1st. Ensign. This was the college military company, founded in 1770, and named the Marti-Mercurian Band because of its...
24[27th.] (Adams Papers)
Friday dined with the Abbés at Passi.
2510th. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
Finish’d Cicero’s oration pro Marcello. In the afternoon I went to the shops with Mr. Artaud. Mr. D rode out. Fine weather.
26Tuesday March 1st. 1785. (Adams Papers)
Coldest weather we have had this year. Reaumur’s thermometer at 8 degrees below the freezing point. Abbé de Chalût told me last evening, that neither he nor his brother, (and they are both turned of seventy,) remember ever to have experienced so cold weather in the beginning of March.
Mr. Church proposes to embark on board the british Packet, which is to sail to-morrow. He has offered to take my Letters, and I suppose, he will be the bearer of dispatches from Congress.—Our Passage, though it was not a stormy one, was very tedious. Of eight weeks, that we were at Sea, we had at least four of such calm weather as not to proceed more than 8 or 10 leagues a day. As we were...
28Tuesday[7th]. (Adams Papers)
Dined at Mr. Tracy’s and went in the evening to see la métromanie , and Crispin Rival de son Maitre , at the french Comedy. Alexis Piron, La métromanie, ou, le poète , Paris, 1738 ( Brenner, Bibliographical List Clarence Dietz Brenner, A Bibliographical List of plays in the French Language, 1700-1789 , Berkeley, 1947. ). JQA had seen Le Sage’s Crispin while living in St. Petersburg.
I received in September last, your favour of 11. July preceding, which was brought by Mr: Jones, together with the second part of the third Volume of the Memoirs of the American Academy; intended for the Imperial Academy of Sciences in this City; which has been duly presented to that body. Early in the course of the last Winter, I received from their Secretary the Volume last published of...
3027. (Adams Papers)
Thanksgiving day. Dull weather.
After a detention of twenty days at Helvoetsluys, and a pleasant passage of twenty four hours from thence to Margate I arrived here on the morning of the 11th: instt: The state of the business on which I came, will be known to you before the receipt of this Letter. An English paper that I saw at Rotterdam on the day of my departure from the Hague gave me the first information of Mr: Randolph’s...
I now Sit down with an intent to give you an account of the Place I dind at yesterday doctor Franklin his son a young Gentleman & I went to Place Calld montmartre at the Castle of the Count Brancard & dind there with him and some other Gentleman & Ladies, from which Place there is a most Beautiful Prospect of the City. On this hill the famous king henry the 4th incamped his army when he laid...
This Letter is to introduce to your acquaintance and to recommend to your kind attentions and good offices Dr. Charles Williamson of Milledgeville, a highly respectable Citizen of Georgia and a particular friend of Mr. Walker one of the Senators in Congress from that State—At his desire I am happy to have the opportunity of making Dr. Williamson known to those of my friends who may possess the...
I am always happy to find an opportunity of conversing with you, as we cannot verbally do this it is our duty to do it by writing. I now have a good opportunity to write a few lines to you by Captn. Lovett in a Ship belonging to Mr. Cobet of Beverly, but I can write but a few lines to you for I must write to all my Freinds. We have had the worst 3 Weeks that ever I pass’d in my life. Bad...
It is sometimes said that suspense is worse than the certainty of evil—But it is a hard relief from suspense to be informed of evils worse than were apprehended. From the length of time which had pass’d without bringing me a letter from you, I felt great anxiety; but it was principally for the dear child, whom I had left so unwell—Your letter when it came, announced to me not only the child...
3617. (Adams Papers)
Snow storm. Went to Salem. Supp’d at Amory’s.
Captain Bates arrived here yesterday morning, from Amsterdam, and has lent me a number of American Newspapers, of the month of August, and to the first of September inclusive—They were brought by the Dutch vessel, the Prince of Orange, arrived at the Texel—The same that had touched at Havre de Grace—The Dutch Minister, Mr Changuion had gone in her to America, conveyed by the Ajax, a Dutch...
38[January 1782] (Adams Papers)
Began to read Hume’s history of England. David Hume, The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, 8 vols., London, 1763, which JQA borrowed from the English or British Library of St. Petersburg, where he found “a good collection of English Authors” (Dana to JA , 25 Jan. , Adams Papers ). JQA ’s notes (copied quotations) from his reading of Hume appear...
In answer to your Letter of yesterday I readily agree that the board of my two Sons residing with you should be for the ensuing year at the rate of five dollars a week each, and I beg you and Mrs. Welsh and Miss Harriet to accept our warmest thanks for your unvarying kindness to them— I am with the strongest respect and attachment Dear Sir / Faithfully Yours MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Esquire, do make and declare this to be my last Will and Testament. I give and bequeath to my eldest Son George Washington Adams, all that real Estate in Quincy, in the County of Norfolk, known by the name of the Mount-Wollaston Farm, conveyed to me by my honoured father, by his Deed dated the twenty-third...
I have received only one letter from you—that of 25. Novr: since I left you—And none from any of my other friends—Though I accustom myself to Patience in the expectation of Letters I begin to feel extremely anxious; lest some of you should be ill—The Mails have been interrupted by the obstructions in the Roads, and I have imputed the delay of your letters to this as long as I could—But we have...
I return the enclosed letter according to your desire, painfully regretting, that I can not consistently with my sense of my duties, comply with the wish of the writer; and yours in his behalf. The reasons of this I cannot fully explain to you, but I trust you will be assured they are not incompatible with that ardent and sincere affection to which you so forcibly appeal, & the power of which...
M r Thomas Munroe Jun r a young man of estimable character, and highly respectable family and connections, having a desire to proceed to St. Petersburg with the view of offering his services in a military capacity to H.I.M. the Emperor Alexander, I have been requested to furnish him with a letter to you, to make known his wishes, and to solicit such countenance, as you may be disposed to...
Our Sons John and Charles are come home from school this morning, to spend the Michaelmas Holidays, and have brought one of their schoolmates with them, to whom John has taken a great liking and who is nearly of his age. He was already here, part of the Summer Holidays, and is a very intelligent and well behaved boy. These Holidays come so often that I am not at all partial to them; but those...
This morning Pappa went out and came back again at about eleven o clock. At about two o clock Commodore Gillon came to our lodgings and went out to dinner with Pappa but my brother Charles and myself dined at our lodgings. At about four o clock Pappa came back without Commodore Gillon. Pappa drank tea at our lodgings. After tea Brother Charles and myself went to take a walk and got back at...
4624th. (Adams Papers)
Charles went to Boston this morning, and brought me back some letters from Europe. I went in the forenoon with Miss Betsey Cranch, down to Mrs. Quincy’s where she intends to spend a few days: but I did not see either of the ladies there: Miss Quincy, has in some measure recovered from the illness occasioned by a mistake in taking a medicine. I spent my time this day as I have every day since I...
4721. (Adams Papers)
Heard Mr. Andrews, preach. Bouscaren. Mr. Carter.
On the 22d. of September, the day upon which I entered on the Execution of the duties of my Office, I received your Letter of the 16th. which the pressure of business prevented me from answering immediately—Your mother however answered it for me, and now that I am enabled to catch a moment of leisure, I take advantage of it to write to you myself. Your remarks upon Mr Gilman’s discourses which...
I wrote you the letter of which a copy is enclosed on the very day of my dear wife’s confinement.—I sent it under cover to the Secretary of State, by Mr. Richard Willing who sailed in the Bengal for Philadelphia.—He has been gone only two or three days, so that the copy may perhaps reach you sooner than the original I ought in it to have acknowledged the receipt of your favour of 1. April,...
As you may possibly not come here before the 18th I write to know, if I must leave these lodgings at that time, as the month will then be up, and if I stay any longer I must begin another month. I have finish’d Phaedrus’s fables and the lives of Miltiades, Themistocles, Aristides, Pausanias, Cimon, and Lysander; and Am going next upon Alcibiades in Cornelius Nepos, I shall begin upon...