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    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Shaw, William Smith

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Recipient="Shaw, William Smith"
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To receive the money, from John Green—and settle with Captain Brazier for the blinds. To receive the monies on the Accounts of Mr: Poor, of Newbury-Port. of Mr: W. Coolidge P. C. Brooks. of Mr: McIntire of Captn: Fenno. To attend to the Exon: of H. College vs Simpson. Do:—on the actions at Dedham. To receive on the 18th: of Novr: $140:89—for Rent of the House in Court Street, and $150 every...
I see by the newspapers that a tenth assessment has been made on the Neponset Bridge Shares; of $38 on each share; which of course makes my shares chargeable with $228—for the payment of which I will thank you to receive, Whitcomb’s quarter’s rent due 1. January next;—this will be $200—and the balance, please to pay from any balance you may have in your hands—If you have none, I will send you...
I received last evening with much pleasure your favour of the 5th: instt:—I had been so long without any intelligence from home, that I began to be uneasy—And even now, I cannot but wish you had said something about the family at Quincy—I believe it is more than a month since I have heard from thence, at all—I am anxious particularly to know the state of health of my dear mother. I am much...
I received yesterday your favour of the 13th: instt: inclosing a strip from the Centinel for the history of which I am much obliged to you—I had already seen it and have written a long letter to Mr: Hall, containing my observations upon it, which I presume he will communicate either in tenor or substance to you—I do not impute either the writing or the publication of those remarks to a...
I have particular reasons for requesting you to inform me who the member of Congress was, from whom Mr: Russell received the letter he shewed you, containing remarks on my conduct with points of admiration, and the quotation from Virgil—The knowledge of his name will in every probability enable me to make such explanations to him as will be entirely satisfactory to him and to me.—As Mr Russell...
I yesterday submitted three resolutions to the consideration of the Senate, of which it is probable you will hear more, and perhaps to some federalists in your quarter, they will be thought as wonderful and as lamentable, as one or two of my votes on former occasions. They were rejected by the Senate, with no small degree of indignation express’d by the majority—The yeas and nays, on the two...
I inclose you two bills, now pending before the two Houses of Congress, which I wish may be immediately published in the newspapers at Boston, as one or the other of them will in all probability pass in some shape or other, and I apprehend will be productive of important consequences not only to the commerce but to the peace of the United States. The zeal upon this occasion is of such burning...
I inclose you an order on Mr: Gurley, for the Rent which will be due on the 18th: of next month—And also a letter which I will thank you to send or deliver. I have sent my brother for some time past, regularly, the materials, for information what we are about here—The want of this information is so apparent in the newspapers, that one would imagine it of no sort of consequence in your part of...
I have received and thank you for your favour of 25. Feby: In consequence I suppose of the great fall of snow, which you mention, we have had here eight days of cold as severe as at almost any period of the Winter. The House of Representatives have agreed to adjourn on the 19th: instt: with which it is probable the Senate will concur.— My children have both bad colds—We are apprehensive they...
Congress have agreed to adjourn this day week—I propose to leave this place a few days afterwards—Shall stop a few days at New–York; and hope within a month to see you in Boston. We are in the midst of a discussion on a bill to remove the temporary seat of Government to Baltimore—The History of this is not a little curious; but I must reserve an account of it, for a future occasion—While I...