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    • Adams, John Quincy
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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In the Summer of 1816 I received under a cover from you, a Letter, addressed to Jeremy Bentham, of Queen Square Place, Westminster, a person then known to me only by reputation. I called at his house to deliver the Letter, but he was then absent in the Country, and I left the Letter to be forwarded to him. A few weeks afterwards a friend of his, who resides with him, a Mr Koe, came to my...
A Resolution of Congress of 27. March last, directs the publication of the Journal of the Convention which formed the present Constitution of the United States, now remaining in this Office, and all Acts and proceedings of that Convention, which are in the possession of the Government of the United States. On the 19th. of March 1796. there were deposited in this Office by President...
A Roman Sculptor, named Cardelli, an artist of distinguished talent, reduced by political vicissitudes, and hard necessity to make eggs and leaves on the Cornices and Friezes of the Capitol at this place, but panting for posthumous glory as if he were a Roman of the age of Fabius or of Scipio, has conceived the project of making his way to immortality by taking from the life, the Busts of the...
Mr. Cardelli the Sculptor, whom at my solicitation you have kindly permitted to visit Montpellier for the purpose of taking your Bust will have the honour of delivering you this Letter. From the knowledge I have of his talent and the success with which he has taken that of President Monroe, I hope he will execute the work to your satisfaction and with my thanks for your indulgence in giving...
In a Letter which I had the honour of receiving from you last November, you observed, in relation to a plan of Government offered by Coll Hamilton, to the federal Convention in 1787, that it was not formally presented as a plan to be debated, but read by him, in the course of a Speech. Could you favour me so far, as to inform me of the day upon which that Speech was delivered, and the question...
I scarcely know how to apologize to you for troubling you again on the subject of the Journals of the federal Convention. I have already been indebted to you for the means of completing the Journal, which had been deposited at this Department; and in which the proceedings of the last two days were wanting. It appears by the Journal that on the 12th. of September a revised draught of the plan...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your Letter of the 13th. instt. The error in the printed Journal of the Convention, by which the motion on the 7th. of September for the establishment of a Council of State, is ascribed to you, is in the original list of yeas and nays, taken at the time by the Secretary, who probably in the hurry of writing made the mistake which you suggest of your name...
In requesting your acceptance of the copy herewith transmitted of a Collection of Documents recently published by me, I think it necessary to ask of your indulgence to overlook that part of it which is personally controversial. The transactions to which it relates having occurred during your Administration and the discussion involving in some degree sanctioned by you, I have thought they would...
I take the liberty of introducing to your acquaintance, the bearer, Mr Coolidge, of Boston, a young Gentleman of highly respectable character & connections, who from motives, which I am happy to have it in my power to gratify, is anxious of obtaining an introduction to you. I am with the highest respect, Dear Sir, your very humble & obedt. Servt. Letterbook copy ( MHi : Adams Papers). Joseph...
¶ From John Quincy Adams. Letter not found. 30 June 1824. Calendared in the list probably kept by Peter Force ( DLC : series 7, box 2). Offered for sale in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 (1892), item 99, as a printed letter, signed, “conveying two copies of fac-similes of the original Declaration of Independence, engraved by Wm. J. Stone; also the resolution of Congress respecting the...
I take much satisfaction in having the opportunity of introducing to you Mr George Sullivan a Citizen of Massachusetts the son of a former governor of that State in his life time I believe personally well known to you & distinguished during the period of our Revolutionary War as well as in more recent times. Mr Sullivan is at this time agent of the State for certain claims on the Government of...
I take the liberty of introducing to your acquaintance Mr Owen of Lanark, whose plans for the improvement of the condition of man, have certainly not escaped your notice & by the excellency of the ends to which they aspire carry with them a recommendation of the means by which he thinks they may be accomplished. I am, with the highest respect, Dear Sir, your very obedt. Servt. Letterbook copy...
The enclosed small packet, addressed to your lady, has just been received from Mr Hughes, our Chargé d’Affaires to the Netherlands. To account for its present appearance, I have to remark that it was by Mr Hughes transmitted to me open, with permission, of which I have availed myself to peruse its contents. To this indulgence of Mr Hughes I am indebted not only for the knowledge of the...
In enclosing to you a copy of a pamphlet relating to subjects not without interest in the history of our Country I avail myself of the occasion to assure you of the deep sympathy with which I have learnt the affliction with which you have recently been visited by the decease of your venerable parent, and of the undeviating respect and attachment with which I remain Your friend and Servt...
Your friendly Letter of the 24th. ulto is received, and the remark which you make in it respecting General Hamilton, as well as your own position, in the affairs of this Union from 1804 to 1814, induce me to request an appeal to your own recollections with regard to some of the facts involved in this controversy. And first let me premise that Mr Plumer’s testimony in the pamphlet which you...
Your favour of the 30th. ulto. with its enclosures would have been received with unmingled pleasure, but for the alloy of its intimations with regard to the state of your health—The partial relief which you have recently enjoyed, I will hope may have been symptomatic of a more general renovation, and reserve for you yet years of comfort and tranquility to witness the continual gigantic growth...