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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Adams Presidency" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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The shortness of my paper, & of my time yesterday abridged my discription of the natural ruins at Adersback, one of the most curious objects we have yet viewed upon this journey. As I was closing my letter, the king & queen passed under our windows, on their way to Fürstenstein. There, a double entertainment combining the fashionable amusements of antient & modern times, a carousel & a...
From the cloister at Grüssau (the day before yesterday) we returned to dine with Mr Ruck at Landeshut—It was a formal dinner of thirty persons according to the fashion of the country; we sat down soon after one, & rose from table just before six. The whole of this time is employed in eating; for the ladies & gentlemen rose together, & there was little wine drank. But as only one dish is served...
Upon our arrival here, I hastened immediately to deliver a letter I had for a clergyman of the place, Mr Hoffman. Unfortunately for us he was obliged to go early yesterday morning to Hirschberg. He requested however his friend Mr Frideric to show us the objects deserving a stranger’s curiosity here, which he has accordingly done. They consist principally of linen manufacturies of various...
Since our return to this place we have indulged ourselves with a few days of rest. The morning after we came back, I went over the lutheran church, which is the handsomest building in the town, & makes a conspicuous figure in all the views from the neighbouring hills. It is built in the shape of a cross, painted white, & roofed with red tile. These colours shew to great advantage here, as they...
4. August. Monday. The reason, which induces travellers, who purpose a visit to the Riesenkoppe, to pass the night before at the Hempel’s baude is, that they may ascend the mountain in the morning early enough to see the sunrise, from its summit—Such was our own intention; but when we rose at two o’clock in the morning, Louisa, found herself suffering so severe a headache, that she was obliged...
In limiting each of these letters to a single sheet of paper, I find myself often obliged to break off in the midst of my story, & to give you in different letters, fragments of our transactions in one day—My principal reason for this is to spare your patience, which I hope will last the longer for only having to undergo the trial of one sheet at a time—I now proceed therefore in the account...
At the close of my last letter I left you, in a cool refreshing shade, in the view of the Kockelfall, from which we proceeded the same evening to this inn—It was, as you may suppose, a fatiguing day; though not so much so, as one or two we have gone through since, & several, which still await us—This village in one respect resembles an American country, more than any other spot I have seen in...
If your map of Silesia is a good one, the spot from which I date this will be marked upon it. If not you must make a point about half way between Hirschberg, & the Riesen gebirge , & you will hit the identical krestcham , or inn, from which I write. It is the first moment I have had for the purpose since I closed my last to you—We were told before we left Berlin, that the tour of these...
The dimensions of my paper compelled me to break off my last letter before I had finished giving you an account of all we had seen the forenoon we stayed at Bunzlau. Yet I had little more to say; for our visit at the orphan house, which is at the same time a public school, scarcely deserves mentioning. We saw there nothing but a chapel & a dining hall, in which there were about thirty boys at...
Yesterday morning early we took our departure from Freystadt, & came to this place; a distance of eight german miles; five of which are in single stage from Sprotau here. The face of the country has visibly & greatly improved as we came along; & although we still had to wade through miles of sands more, or less deep, we were frequently relieved by patches of good roads, & by beautiful fields...