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    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
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    • Adams Presidency

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After having given you a short account of the civil, political, & military Constitution of Silesia, it will be proper to say something of its administration in ecclesiastical concerns; an object somewhat complicated in a province the inhabitants of which are divided with so near an equality of numbers into Roman catholics and protestants. I have in my former letters already given you a...
On the 7th: of this month I wrote informing you that I had withdrawn from Amsterdam all the funds I had there and remitted to Mr King in London fourteen hundred pounds sterling for which I authorised you to draw upon him and employ for me, with the usual commission—I left the mode of employment to your own vigilance and discretion, excluding only to our friends of the Union in which under...
The object of this letter will be to give you an idea of the political Constitution of the province of Silesia. By the word Constitution I do not here understand what commonly goes by that name in our Country. The supreme power in this as in most the other Prussian provinces, is in the hands of a single person. It is a simple monarchy. But it is governed by permanent laws, with regular forms,...
I last weak informed you that I had withdrawn from Amsterdam all the stocks I held there, and had remitted to Mr. King, in London fourteen hundred pounds sterling, for which I authorised you to draw, and requested you to place the proceeds in the most advantageous manner, but not in any institution or fund depending upon our national Union; for the generality of our Countrymen are so far from...
The burthens, to which I referred at the close of my last letter, & to which the inhabitants of Silesia are subjected under the Prussian Government are. 1. The compulsory obligation of serving the king as soldiers. 2. The obligation of giving quarters to the troops—and 3. Of performing personal labor, & furnishing horses for the king’s use, that of his army, & of his civil officers at...
I received only three days ago your N: 22. dated the 6th: of December, and containing the melancholy tidings of the death of our unhappy brother at New York. I had been informed of it two days earlier by a letter from my excellent friend Mr Murray at the Hague, who had seen an account of it in a New York Gazette.—Of the Situation in which he has left his wife and children you say nothing, but...
The most important change in the internal condition of Silesia, which followed its conquest by the king of Prussia, proceeds from the precautions which he found necessary to secure it. Under the Austrian Government, there had been no strongly fortified places to bar the progress of an invader & not more than two thousand men garrisoned within the province in time of peace. You have seen by...
As my purpose is only to give you the great & general outlines of the Silesian history, with a special view to show the origin of the conquest, which made it a Prussian province, I shall merely, to complete the chronological series of its Austrians sovereigns observe to you, that the Emperor Leopold 1. at his death in 1705 was succeeded by his eldest son, Joseph. 1 who dying in 1711, made way...
In my last letter, by a halfline of postscript, I told you that peace between the Austrians & French was signed. I wrote this upon information I had received just before I closed my letter, & although I had reason to believe it authentic, it has since proved erroneous. In wishing to give the latest news, you know how often we are liable to give groundless humours for facts, & therefore it is...
The transfer of Silesia from the Bohemian to the Hungarian dominions which as I have before informed you was the result of the Hussite wars, complicated with a disputed succession to the crowns of both those kingdoms, was followed by much more important changes in the condition of the inhabitants, than had been produced by the preceeding revolutions. The numerous petty princes, who had been...