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    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
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For I suppose you must have an explanation to keep you current with the vieux stile , now-a-days.— I have received your pleasant account from Brussels of your travels thus far. Continue to write me as often as you can, and sur tout return as speedily as possible. I have read something in Adam Smith about the wonders performed by division of labour. I know very well the effects of its...
I am very much gratified to find by your favour of the 26 th: that your Journey from Brussels was so pleasant, and that you are so well satisfied with what you had seen.— I shall request Mess rs: Moliere to extend your credit with their correspondents at Paris. There is a Danish vessel going to Lisbon from Amsterdam in the course of three weeks or a month. I shall go to Amsterdam in a few days...
Mess rs: Moliere, will this day extend your credit with their correspondent at Paris, to the amount of 4000 livres more. This I presume will amply suffice for your occasions. I requested you by my last letter, to be here not later than the 25 th: of this month. There is to be a Ball on that day at the Hotel de Suéde. The Count desires me to tell you, that you will be very much wanted as a...
I have just got your agreeable favours of 8–9— & 11— May, and as this is the last day upon which I can write to reach you at Paris, and I have but little time for the post, I shall be short. M r: Arnoux’s letter has given me great pleasure, and I wish you if you have time, to give him my grateful thanks for it; for his kind remembrance of the family, as well as his attentions to you. Madame de...
I arrived here last Evening and this morning received your cover, enclosing the Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury.— There are Letters here from America, as late as the 29 th: of April. M r: Murray had then sailed so that he may be looked for every day. I have not yet seen M r: Damen, and of course have made no arrangements. I shall make none immediately for my own departure. I feel a...
The enclosed paper will give you an exact idea of that property belonging to of Doctor Welsh, and our Brother Charles, which it is that you would take under your care and management upon your arrival in America. When my library shall arrive from Lisbon you will consult with your mother for a place of security in which to lodge it. If it should be joined to that of my father, you will take care...
We have received and been entertained with your letters from Dessau, Magdeburg and Brunswic.—We hope to hear from you, to day or to-morrow, at Hamburg, where upon your arrival, you must have found abundance of letters, either to, or for you. You ask for news; but you are now so much nearer the sources of all the important news, that it must rather come from you to us, than go from us to you....
We have received your letter of the 12th: to Mrs. Adams, but that which you mention as having written the day before to me, has not come to hand. Perhaps the pleasures of the feast put it out of your mind to send it as I cannot well account otherwise for its not having arrived—My principal concern is that it would inform me whether you have received all the letters I have forwarded to Mr...
I know not how it happened, but so it was that your favor of the 11th: instt: did not come to hand untill the day before yesterday—And yesterday came those of 17th: and 19th: both together—I am sorry that you cannot get sooner off, and very glad that you are likely to get so good an opportunity for conveyance. I shall send you some more letters before you go; at present I have none...
I have received your’s of the 26th. enclosing one for Mr Welsh—I now forward those Letters for America, with which I threatned you in my last—Of all the news which you believed or expected to believe, the only parts likely to be confirmed, are the capture of the Leander with Capt. Berry on board, and of the two french frigates by the Colossus—The burning of the transports in the Nile has no...
Without an extraordinary portion of incredulity, I might still dispute, the full confirmation of your news, as the whole of the Brest squadron, was not taken by Sir J. B Warren, and we are yet quite uncertain here what part of it really fell into his hands—But I had rather beleive in the official confirmation of the reports announcing the destruction of the transports at Alexandria, though it...
I write a line in answer to your’s of the 9th: and to send you the enclosed for J. Hall, though the wind here is easterly since yesterday, and you may have improved it, to sail upon your voyage. There are no Russian troops marching towards Pomerania—There is a new Edict here against secret Societies, of which I shall immediately forward a translation, though probably not in time to reach you...
We received your short Letter of 19 November written just as the pilot from the mouth of the Elbe was about to leave you. Since that time untill this day we have had almost incessantly Easterly winds blowing, & we hope that you enjoyed the benefit of them, & long before this find yourself restored to the bosom of our Country & friends. Since your departure several circumstances have occurred...
Somewhat more than a month ago I received the very welcome intelligence that the vessel on board of which you were a passenger had arrived at New-York. Some days later, a letter from Mr. Murray mentioned that he had seen your arrival announced in a Philadelphia newspaper of the 15th: of January.Soon after, I received from our ever dear and honoured mother a letter of 1. Feby: fully confirming...
The day after I wrote you last; I received yours of 17 Jany: brought by Mr. McHenry, and which in Chronological order should have come to hand first. My present object is only to say something relative to my own affairs. By letters from our mother written before your arrival, I learnt how Charles had conducted, with regard to my property....To comment upon his proceedings would be useless, but...
I enclose herewith, a letter for Messrs: Jennings & Woddrop of Charlestown, which I will thank you to forward to them & to send them at the same time Six dollars, which you will charge to me—I suppose you will easily find an opportunity, & be sure to send the dollars with the letter, for it is to repay money, which they have advanced, to comply with a request from me, & I know not otherwise...
My last letter to you upon private affairs was of April 29. Since which I have received none from you, when untill last evening, when your’s of 4. to 12. March, from Quincy, and of 11. May from Baltimore, both come to hand—In the last, you mention having written me, at full length, the week before by the way of London, but this letter I have not received Your account of the administration of...
I wrote you last week, and now repeat for your information in case that letter should fail in the conveyance, that I have concluded to keep my obligations in Holland, and not to dispose of them, as I had proposed to you in my letter of 29. April—But that you may on the 1st: of January next, draw upon the Secretary of State 2000 Dollars, on my account, and send me an order upon Messrs: Willink,...
To your long letter of March 4–12. I ought to say something more than is merely contained in mine of the 1st: instt: in answer, without waiting for your letter by the way of England, written in the beginning of May, which I have not yet received. Yesterday a couple of small packets of news-papers and cuttings dated February and March, came to hand, which I suppose you sent with your letter...
I received last evening your letter of 5. May, and having written you twice within a fortnight have now not much to say.—But I cannot forbear to give you my best thanks for your care relative to my affairs both at Boston and New York, as well as your own use and employment of the authority which I gave you to draw in my behalf—I fully approve of all your proceedings. I have this day drawn upon...
I received your N. 6. dated 3. June, about three weeks ago, at this place, and should have replied to it sooner, but for a violent fever which seized me on the first of this month, and confined me for about ten days—It was only an intermittent, and paid me no more than five visits; but they were long and severe enough to leave me very weak.—I think myself now altogether recovered, and can...
My last Letter to you was from Töplitz, of the 16th: of last month, since which I have received your N: 7. June 26. and 8. July 12. the former, a few days before leaving Töplitz, and the latter since arriving here.—Your punctuality, and frequency in writing, give me the greatest pleasure, and your constant attention to my affairs deserves my continual thanks.—I presume that before this time...
My last letter to you, was from Dresden, and dated the 17th: of last month, since which I have not had the pleasure to receive anything from you. We spent a month at that place very agreeably, & as long as the picture gallery remained open, I did not fail to visit it almost every day. We likewise went to Königstein, & saw also at Dresden the electoral jewels, the library, the old porcellain,...
I herewith enclose to you the following papers. 1. An original Note of hand from Jacob Mark & Co: signed by their agent John Speyer to Mr Engel for 26000.—dated 5. April. 1795. 2. An original letter from Jacob Mark & Co: dated New York, 26. July. 1799.—which may serve in case of need to prove their acknowledgement of the debt. 3.—A power of attorney from Mr. Engel to you, authorising you to...
The above is a duplicate of the letter, which I Sent about ten days ago, with the papers mentioned in it—I now enclose duplicates of the power & letters & authenticated copies of the original note of hand & Letter from Jacob Mark & Co: MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Two days ago, I received together your letters of September 9. & 23. Numbers 9 & 10.—I now enclose copies of my letters of 30 May, & 1. July, together with a duplicate of a letter to Messrs: Jennings & Woddrop of Charlestown, which I sent you with the former of them—I still remain indebted to those gentlemen for the six dollars, & must again request you to send them the money—I regret...
I humble myself in dust and ashes to confess that I must at one and the same time acknowledge the receipt of seven letters from you—viz—of 26 and 30. October and 29. December 1799—of 31. Jany: original and duplicate of 1. and 25. Feby: of the current year—But as if you had meant to make my responsibility less burthensome to me the numbers are not regularly noted—For N. 12 is repeated; and...
I have remitted to Mr. King in London five hundred pounds sterling, for which I have informed him that I should authorize you to draw upon my account, and which he will accordingly discharge upon bills drawn by you. I wish you to take the first opportunity of a favourable exchange upon London, to draw for this moneys which you will employ for me as you shall see most expedient In the same...
Doctor Johnson somewhere says that a short letter to a distant friend is a sort of insult; but I hope you will not be of that opinion—I know however that it is an unpleasant disappointment, after having your expectations raised by the sight of a distant friend’s superscription and seal, to find them only for a duplicate, or a letter to a third person; and I therefore add a few lines, on...
I received two days ago your N: 16. dated the 11th: of May, which you gave to Mr: Treat, with injunctions to take special care of it—Now, mark how, specially this recommendation was observed—In order to secure your letter from all accident, which might happen to the bag, Mr: Treat put it into his own trunk.—But being boarded by the officer of a french privateer, he was obliged to submit his...
On the 10th: of last month I wrote you a letter, informing you that I had remitted to Mr. King, our Minister at London five hundred pounds sterling, and authorizing you to draw upon him to that amount—I likewise gave you directions for the employment of the money.—I have now remitted to him five hundred pounds more, for which I hereby authorize you in like manner to draw upon him, and which...
I cannot send you a duplicate without adding a Line to it; for there is a pleasure in knowing that our distant friends are well, though but one day later than we have already heard from them We have been spending several days at Charlottenburg with Dr Brown’s family, and Louisa’s health which never fails to droop at Berlin in the summer has derived benefit from it. To morrow morning we set out...
As I have bespoke your company, upon our journey into Silesia, I begin this letter at our first resting station from Berlin. Hitherto we have indeed seen little more than the usual Brandenburg sands, & perhaps you will find our tour as tiresome as we have found it ourselves—I cannot promise you an amusing journey, though I hope it will prove so to us; & if at the sight of this my first letter...
As I have stipulated that you shall peruse none of my letters written upon this tour, but with your map in hand, I need not tell you perhaps that this is the first town we have reached after entering upon the borders of Silesia. Its distance from Frankfort is ten German miles—We left that place yesterday at one in the afternoon, & experienced again we had done more than once before how...
Yesterday morning early we took our departure from Freystadt, & came to this place; a distance of eight german miles; five of which are in single stage from Sprotau here. The face of the country has visibly & greatly improved as we came along; & although we still had to wade through miles of sands more, or less deep, we were frequently relieved by patches of good roads, & by beautiful fields...
The dimensions of my paper compelled me to break off my last letter before I had finished giving you an account of all we had seen the forenoon we stayed at Bunzlau. Yet I had little more to say; for our visit at the orphan house, which is at the same time a public school, scarcely deserves mentioning. We saw there nothing but a chapel & a dining hall, in which there were about thirty boys at...
If your map of Silesia is a good one, the spot from which I date this will be marked upon it. If not you must make a point about half way between Hirschberg, & the Riesen gebirge , & you will hit the identical krestcham , or inn, from which I write. It is the first moment I have had for the purpose since I closed my last to you—We were told before we left Berlin, that the tour of these...
At the close of my last letter I left you, in a cool refreshing shade, in the view of the Kockelfall, from which we proceeded the same evening to this inn—It was, as you may suppose, a fatiguing day; though not so much so, as one or two we have gone through since, & several, which still await us—This village in one respect resembles an American country, more than any other spot I have seen in...
In limiting each of these letters to a single sheet of paper, I find myself often obliged to break off in the midst of my story, & to give you in different letters, fragments of our transactions in one day—My principal reason for this is to spare your patience, which I hope will last the longer for only having to undergo the trial of one sheet at a time—I now proceed therefore in the account...
4. August. Monday. The reason, which induces travellers, who purpose a visit to the Riesenkoppe, to pass the night before at the Hempel’s baude is, that they may ascend the mountain in the morning early enough to see the sunrise, from its summit—Such was our own intention; but when we rose at two o’clock in the morning, Louisa, found herself suffering so severe a headache, that she was obliged...
Since our return to this place we have indulged ourselves with a few days of rest. The morning after we came back, I went over the lutheran church, which is the handsomest building in the town, & makes a conspicuous figure in all the views from the neighbouring hills. It is built in the shape of a cross, painted white, & roofed with red tile. These colours shew to great advantage here, as they...
Upon our arrival here, I hastened immediately to deliver a letter I had for a clergyman of the place, Mr Hoffman. Unfortunately for us he was obliged to go early yesterday morning to Hirschberg. He requested however his friend Mr Frideric to show us the objects deserving a stranger’s curiosity here, which he has accordingly done. They consist principally of linen manufacturies of various...
From the cloister at Grüssau (the day before yesterday) we returned to dine with Mr Ruck at Landeshut—It was a formal dinner of thirty persons according to the fashion of the country; we sat down soon after one, & rose from table just before six. The whole of this time is employed in eating; for the ladies & gentlemen rose together, & there was little wine drank. But as only one dish is served...
The shortness of my paper, & of my time yesterday abridged my discription of the natural ruins at Adersback, one of the most curious objects we have yet viewed upon this journey. As I was closing my letter, the king & queen passed under our windows, on their way to Fürstenstein. There, a double entertainment combining the fashionable amusements of antient & modern times, a carousel & a...
Yesterday morning early we left Schweidnitz, & came seven german miles, through the towns of Reichenbach, Frankenstein & Wertha, to this place—Reichenbach is chiefly remarkable for being the place where the last treaty between Austria & Prussia was concluded, and for a new Lutheran church, the architecture of which is at once the most simple & elegant of any similar building that I ever...
When I closed my last letter to you yesterday morning at 2 o’clock, in Wünschelberg, from the appearance of the weather I had very little expectation of seeing the sun at the summit of the Heuschauer. About three however I sat out accompanied by my guide, with his lanthern in his hand, for it was still dark as midnight. For two hours & a half I went constantly ascending, excepting one, or two...
Before we left Berlin to come upon this tour, we were advised not to pass through Breslau at all. It was said to be a large old city, resembling all other great cities, & containing nothing that deserved the attention of travellers. We had therefore not put it down upon the original list of our route. But when we found ourselves in the course of our excursion within a few miles of it, we...
After a tour of nearly four weeks, in the course of which we have visited most of the places worthy of remark in the province of lower Silesia, we are once more here, upon our return home, which we concluded to take through Dresden & Leipzig—In my former letters from this place, you have seen how much we were pleased with it, & it is with no small satisfaction that we have now an opportunity...
I continue to number my letters, although the series containing our Silesian tour is closed, so that untill our return to Berlin, you may know whether you receive all those I write—At Dresden from which my last to you was dated, we spent six days, in the course of which I renewed my acquaintance with the picture gallery, made an excursion one afternoon to Tharandt, through the valley of...
I had been almost three months without receiving a line from you, or from any other of my correspondents in America; and although upon coolly considering circumstances I was sensible that this was the natural fruit of my own neglect of writing during the last Winter, yet as one’s feelings never make the allowances which sober reason requires, I began to think it strange to be so long without...