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When I returnd yesterday from a litle excursion which we had made for a week into the Country of Essex to the seat of mr Brand Hollis, an excelent Englishman I had the pleasure of finding your obliging favour of june 4th. Mrs Copley had informd me a fortnight before of your safe arrival. I must congratulate you upon setting your foot again upon American ground. To Say that I love it above all...
I received your kind letter of February 12th, as well as one, by Mr. Storer, of February 2d. I have been every day since thinking that I would write to you, but a superior duty has occupied all my time for six weeks past. I have been only two days (when I was too sick to attend) absent from the sick bed of your grandmother. Your desire, that her last days might be rendered as comfortable as it...
I wrote to you by your brother making a proposal to you which you might not consider me in earnest about— Since then I have two additional motives to request the Col s consideration and your’s of the subject. If setting aside family connexions it is with respect to business a matter of indifference which city you reside in I certainly could wish it might be Philadelphia for four years to come....
I received, by Mr. King, your letter of December 30th. I am uneasy if I do not hear from you once a week, though you have not any thing more to tell me than that you and your little ones are well. I think you do perfectly right in refusing to go into public during the absence of Colonel Smith. The society of a few friends is that from which most pleasure and satisfaction are to be derived....
I quitted you with a heavy heart with many reflections upon my mind known only to myself. You ask me why I choose to be separated from my children? To see my children happy around me would be a felicity to me which Providence does not see fit to grant me— Some are called to act their part in a foreign land— Others are destined to live at a distance where our intercourse must be chiefly by...
You must not flatter yourself with the expectation of hearing from Colonel Smith until the February packet arrives. It is as soon as you ought to think of it. You see by the papers, that a minister is in nomination from England, and Mrs. C—— writes, will come out soon. Mrs. P——, from whom I received a letter, writes me by the last packet, that Mr. Friere is certainly appointed from Portugal,...
April the 2 d: and the anniversary of the birth of my dear Grandson whom I am half distracted to see again, with all his pretty, winning pranks. God bless and preserve the dear boy and grant us all, a happy meeting on the other side the great water. We left London on Sunday about two o clock, and arrived here on Monday evening, having made a very good exchange of the Bath Hotel for the...
I received yours of February 13th, and was happy to learn that you and your little ones were well. I wrote to you by the Chief Justice, and sent your silk by him. He promised me to visit you, and from him you will learn how we all are. We have had, ever since this month began, a succession of bad weather, and, for this week past, the coldest weather that I have experienced this winter. The...
It is now ten days since we left London, and have been waiting at Portsmouth and here for the ship, but cannot yet learn that she has passed Gravesend. The weather is fine, but this waiting is very tedious, in a place where we have no acquaintance, and very little to interest or amuse us. We took a ride, yesterday, to Newport, the principal town in the island, and visited Carisbrook Castle....
I received your two letters of April 5th and 7th, yesterday, and I enclosed you two from the children, in a letter to your brother this week, receiving them on that day; and not having time to write to you, before the post went. I do not think I have so frequently written to you for a month past, as I did through the winter; and it is because I have felt less anxious for you since the Col.’s...
I suppose you wish to hear from me and from your little boy. He is very well, and very amusing, as usual; talks of William, and of the other papa; is as fond as ever of the “fosses,” and has a great edition to his amusement and pleasures from a flock of sheep, which are daily pastured by a shepherd and his dog upon the lawn in front of our house. Bush Hill, as it is called, though by the way...
It has been no small mortification to me since my arrival here, that I have not been able to hold a pen, or use my hand in writing, until this day. I came on shore with three whitloes upon the thumb and two fingers of my right, and two upon the left hand, so that I could not do the least thing for myself. I begged my friends to write, and let you know of our arrival, after a very tedious...
I would tell you that I had an ague in my face, and a violent toothache, which has prevented my writing to you all day; but I am determined to brave it out this evening, and inquire how you do. Without further complaint, I have become so tender, from keeping so much in a warm chamber, that, as soon as I set my foot out, I am sure to come home with some new pain or ache. On Friday evening last,...
I return you thanks Sir for the trouble you took in exchangeing my Money, our currency is some thing like the Stocks abroad, rises and falls with the News of the Day. MS (not found). Printed from a facsimile in Letters of Mrs. Adams, the Wife of John Adams , ed. CFA , 2d edn., Boston, 1840, vol. 2, frontispiece. At foot of text: “Honble. Oliver Wendell.”
I have not written to you since I received yours of January 5th. I go from home but very little, yet I do not find my time hang heavy upon my hands. You know that I have no aversion to join in the cheerful circle, or mix in the world, when opportunity offers. I think it tends to rub off those austerities which age is apt to contract, and reminds us, as Goldsmith says, “that we once were...
Mrs Jeffry sails in Captain Scott and is so good as to say that she will take Letters to you. I have written to you by Captain Barnard who generally has quick passages—and by his return I hope to hear from you. I had Letters last week from Charles. he writes that our Friends in N york were all well, excepting chief Justice Jay who had been dangerously Sick, but was then on the recovery. The...
[ London, 12 Aug. 1785. Record in SJL of its receipt on 23 Sep. 1785 reads: “Mrs. Adams’s. Grosvenor sq. Lond. Aug. 12. by W. Short.” Not found; see Abigail Adams to TJ, 21 Aug. 1785 .]
I hope you are safe landed at Jamaica, before this time, with Mr. Smith and my sweet boy; how often have I thought of him, amidst the turbulent waves, which have so frequently encompassed us upon our passage, and prayed that you might have met with more prosperous gales, and a shorter passage than has fallen to our share. On the 20th of April we embarked from Cowes, from whence I wrote you; we...
Mrs. Adams’s compliments to Mr. Jefferson and in addition to her former memorandum she requests half a dozen pr. of mens silk stockings. Mr. Trumble will deliver to Mr. Jefferson four Louis and one Guiney. Mr. parker will be so good as to take charge of them, if no opportunity offers before his return. RC ( DLC ). Not recorded in SJL , but certainly received on 19 Dec. when Trumbull arrived...
Yours of August the 7th. and Col. Smith’s of the 8th. reached us on the 14th. at this place. We left the Hague on Monday, I wrote you an account of our excursion, till Thursday Evening, when I was going to the play. The house is small and ordinary, the Actors as good as one commonly finds them in England. It was the birth day of the Princess of Orange, it was not distinguished that I know of...
It grieves me to think how little I have been able to write to you since my arrival here. I have set apart many hours which I have determined to devote to you, but family cares company sickness have prevented I have received all your kind Letters and thank you for the intelligence containd in them I rejoice at your agreeable situation & wish that I could visit you more than in Idea, but at...
Your papa and I wrote you from Harwich the morning we embarked for Helvoet, the wind was very fair, and we went on board at 3 o clock, a vessel very commodious for passengers, clean, and the least offensive of any that I was ever in. But the passage is a most disagreeable one, and after being on board 18 or 20, hours one might as well proceed on a voyage to America, for I do not think I...
I Received by judge Cushing your very obliging Letter and am very happy to find that your Health was so far restored by your journey as to enable you to attend upon commencment. it would have afforded me much pleasure to have been present as I was peculiarly interested in the day. it is a little Singular that I should have three sons graduated there and not be able to attend at one single...
Although the scenes in which I have been engaged for six weeks past, have been very different from those which you describe, I have been amused and entertained by your account. Though I cannot say that I am charmed with your hero’s personal accomplishments, as you describe them, yet you find I think our ladies ought to be cautious of foreigners. I am almost led to suspect a spy in every...
Mr S. and Mr Blount set off tomorrow for London and have engaged to call this Evening for Letters. We have not received a line from you except what these gentlemen brought us, this is the fourth time I have written to you. If politeness and attention could render a place agreeable, I have had more reason to be pleased with this Country, than any other, that I have visited, and when I get...
It is with inexpressible pleasure that I enclose to you a letter from your brother, and that I can tell you, that I last night received four letters of various dates from your papa, and one so late as the 6th of November. I would send forward the letters, but know not how to part with them. Your papa writes that he has enjoyed uncommon health for him, since his arrival in France; that your...
I received yesterday by way of Nyork your kind Letter of two dates october 28 & Nov br 8 th a fortnight before I received a Letter sent by captain Bunyan I wrote you by mrs Jeffry & once since by way of Liverpool I designd to have written by the last vessel which saild in dec br but I waited to see how the Election would turn for v. P & the vessel saild without my getting a Letter on Board. no...
Mr. Cranch informs me that Hones will go to Town tomorrow, and that I may not miss one opportunity, have now taken my pen to thank you for yours by Tom, and also for that which I have just now received by Mr. Ayres. You seem in high Spirits at which you know I rejoice. Your minute description of the persons you have seen, are very entertaining to me. I cannot consent you should omit writing,...
As your good Lady had promised me the favour of a visit before your return to your Native Town, give me leave sir to request a compliance with the promise and that you would do me the Honour of accompanying her here. I wish sir to be informed by you with regard to the situation of my absent Friend and what congress propose to do with him. The publication of a report of a committe of Congress...
Mr. and Mrs. Adams present their Compliments to Dr. Franklin and hope to have the Honour of his company to day at Dinner, with his Grandson Mr. Bache. They also beg the Favour of him to lend them the Assistance of one of his servants this morning if he can without Inconvenience as they are so unlucky as to have both their Men servants confined to their Chambers by very serious Sickness. RC in...
with regard to politicks the debates of the House will give you an Idea of them, as yet there has been but little Heat upon any Subject, but there is a questions comeing on with regard to the permanant Residence of congress which I fear will create parties, & much vexation. I should think that in the present state of their treasury, an expence so unnecessary ought to be avoided as even...
Mr. Trumble will have the honour of delivering this to you. The knowledge you have of him, and his own merit will ensure him a favourable reception. He has requested a Letter from me, and I would not refuse him, as it gives me an opportunity of paying my respects to a Gentleman for whom I entertain the highest esteem, and whose portrait dignifies a part of our room , tho it is but a poor...
Your Billit was deliverd to me a Day or two ago. I am much obliged to you for your kind offer but indeed Sir I know not where to find my Friend, my Imagination wanders like the Son of Ulyssus from Sea to Sea and from Shoar to Shoar. Tis now four months since the Boston saild in all which time we have never heard a word from our Friend’s. Our Enemies tell us that She is taken and carried into...
I have time only to write you a line or two, not expecting captain Bigolow to Sail so Soon. I was yesterday informd that he would not go till the middle of the week, but this morning he has sent for the Letters. I thought your sister had letters, but she says they are not ready. She wrote you by mr Jenks 3 weeks ago. I must refer you to your Friend Storer for further information as I have...
I have regularly received Your Letters and thank you for them. I have read the pamphlets. the Bone has much good natured Witt, contains many painfull facts, & Shows in a strong light what manner of Spirit actuates the pretended Patriots. the writer has in some places taken, a poetical Licence I have not offerd it where I am. Society and Interest and dissapointed ambition will have their...
Prince will bring this to you; the inclosed Letters I wish you to direct, the thin Paper, to your Father The other to Thomas; Prince is to return on thursday morg̃ by him send the papers and any Letters which you may have; if the weather should prove pleasent, I shall send a Horse for you on saturday. I have seen the dr since I wrote to you, and talkd with him about the meddow. he thinks that...
Mr Adams being absent upon publick Buisness in Holland when your Letter came to Hand I take the Liberty of replying to it, as I know he will be so much hurried for time when he returns as to be unable to attend to private matters, but I can answer for him, and am sure that he harbours no resentment against mrs Ward but wishes both of you success in Life & will rejoice to find that you are in...
Alass! How many snow banks devide thee and me and my warmest wishes to see thee will not melt one of them. I have not heard one Word from thee, or our Little ones since I left home. I did not take any cold comeing down, and find my self in better Health than I was. I wish to hear the same account from you. The Time I proposed to tarry has Elapsed. I shall soon be home sick. The Roads at...
As we have some skitish persons in the Family who are apprehensive of the small pox, and of every Body from your infected city, we shall not have the pleasure of your company, nor the office a visit from you this week. your cousin Lucy informd me to day that you had a letter from your sister. pray send it me or such extracts from it as will inform me how she does and the col and Boys. I am...
I have just sent some Letters to go by Captain Folger, but find he does not sail so soon as captain Cushing. Should he arrive before Folger without a Line I know by experience how fruitfull your imaginition would be of conjectures, and tho I have said all that appeard to me of importance, & perhaps more than others will think of any, in my Letters on Board Folger, I forgot to inclose a paper...
As captain Folger is not yet gone I write a few more lines by him, tho I have nothing new to acquaint you with, only that two days ago my little darling was inoculated for the Small pox. if whenever you come to have Grandchildren, you will scarcly know any difference between them & your own children, particularly if you should be under the same roof with them; I have got mr Jenks to take the...
I must write you a few lines by this opportunity, altho tis a long time since I had the pleasure of hearing from you by your own Hands. You used to be fond of writing and have been very good since your absence. Letters are always valuable from those we Love, if they con­ tain nothing but an account of their Health. I cannot but reflect with thankfullness to the Great Preserver of my dear...
I last Evening received Yours of March the 15 and 17th together with the Money you remitted. it was very fortunate in its arrival, for in half an hour after, I had two fine cows offerd me which I immediatly purchasd tho I gave 40 dollors for them. The sheep Lambd so early, and my cows came in so early that we have expended more english Hay than I could wish, and they Rob’d my Horses to feed...
I arrived here this day week, but have been so constantly occupied in seeing company that I have not had time to write a single Line. I received your Letter which I suppose had been on to Philadelphia, on fryday last, in the full Faith that mr Peabody & you would comply with our request. I took the Children, and brought them with me. John is somewhat indisposed with a return of his Ague— I...
Your favour of july 20th repeated to me the melancholy tidings of my dear Aunts Death. The first information which we received of it, was by a Letter from Mr W. Smith by way of Liverpool in a very short passage, upon the receipt of which I immediately wrote you. No person my dear sir can more sincerely sympathize with you than your afflicted Neice, the kindness with which my dear Aunt always...
I received yours of the 12 th. I wish congress may rise by the time you mention. a Gentleman reported here yesterday that he had heard that mr Langdon had said he was determind to oppose the Treaty in every article. people are very anxious— the col had letters from Halifax which informs him, that without Libeling the vessel, they proceed to unload her & will not permit the Captain nor a single...
I received yours of the 14 th and ever Since thursday have been in Hourly expectation of seeing you I hope it is oweing to all the packets being detaind upon this Side, as is reported, and not to any indisposition that your return is delayed, that unpleasing detention is sufficiently mortifying particularly as we wish to proceed to Falmouth as soon as possible, tho I shall fear to go from...
I cannot omit so good an opportunity as offers by Mr. Church of telling you that we are all well. I wrote you two Letters last week which I sent to Watertown. In those I said every thing that occurd to my mind, nothing since of any importance has taken place. The 19 of April (ever memorable for America as the Ides of March to Rome and to Ceasar) is fixd upon for the examination of the Tories...
I hope every post to hear from you, but every post has hithertoo dissapointed me. a month is a long time to be absent from Home without learning any thing from you. you have often left me and always was very punctual in writing to me. this is but the second time I have left you, and the first that I have been so long without hearing from you. I have written three times before, but have very...
In a Letter from my Dear absent Friend the day before he saild dated on Board the Frigate he informd me that the Evening before he received a Letter from his much Esteemed Friend Mr. L ovel l in which he complained that “Portia did not write to him.” Could Portia have given a greater proof of the high value she placed upon his Friendship and correspondence she would not have withheld her hand....