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I received Your Letter by this days mail of 17 th I am mortified at the loss of mr Whitman, tho from what you wrote me I apprehended it would be so. every one has a right to their own opinion, and my conscience suffers as much when I hear mr. & mr & mr deliver sentiments which I cannot assent to & preach doctrines Which I cannot believe, as my Neighbours because a Man does not wear Calvinism...
I received by the last post your kind Letter and the Poem of Mrs Mortens which the President had received a few days before from the Author “For the beloved President of a Free and enlightned People, the following Poem is gratefully and Respectfully offerd, by the Author” I would fain flatter myself that the fair Authoriss did not take a poetic lisence in this sentance; I send you in return...
I wrote to you from East Chester, but I believe I have not written to you from hence. I was dissapointed in not receiving a Letter by mr Bartlet from you, tho I was much pleased in learning that he brought Letters from you to mrs smith. Seperated as she is from all her connections except her little Girl, and living in a village where she has not any Society, communications by Letters are the...
I receied yesterday your kind favour of 29 Nov’ br and 8 th December. I had a few lines from you on monday I got my Letter to day to myself. I believe I shall not venture to communicate it. the President will be very angry with Some of his Neighbours, if through their means we lose so good a Man, as is now in our power to settle. the judgement of those in opposition is weak. I would sooner...
I received your Letter of Nov br 24 by the post of yesterday. with respect to the Notes you wrote me about I wish you to do by them as you would by your own, as I do not want at present neither Principle or interest. I think it would be most for my interest to do by them as you propose. the method you mention of adding to the out house so as to give me a dairy Room I like very much, and would...
I had the pleasure of receiving from you a very excellent Letter last week, which fully proves that neither your Patriotism, or abilities have sufferd any elimination by your engagements in the ploding buisness of an accomptant, tho a course of years might have blunted the Edge of literary persuits, which are much better suited to your Education, taste and usefulness in Life. I rejoice...
I have the pleasure of informing you and Mrs Adams of the safe arrival of mr Johnson and Family in George Town on the 25 of November, after a passage of 60 Days. I heard from mr Cranch that the Family were all well. I had written to him previous to their arrival to give me immediate notice of it, and I yesterday had the Satisfaction of writing to mrs Johnson to congratulate her upon her...
I received your kind Letter of Nov’ br. 19 th by this days post. I had previously received two others both of which I had replied to, but I do not know how to pass a week without hearing from you. at the same time I received your Letter, I also had one from mrs smith informing me that She had received Letters from the col of 2 d of Nov’ br and that he had written her word that he Should be...
Thus has my son given me a legal right to address you. I feel also, that I have an affectionate right devolved to me from him, to stile you thus. it would have given me great pleasure to have embraced you as Such in America, but as it has been otherways ordered, I must submit to that destiny which has through the greater part of my Life seperated me from my dearest connections. I feel a tender...
I am under obligations to you my dear son, for keeping up so regularly, and so constantly your correspondence with me; notwithstanding your various publick employments and private engagements, and I consider myself as very fortunate in receiving your Letters, tho frequently of an old date, owing to the circuitous route they have to make. By mr Fisher of this city I received a few Days Since...
I received your obliging favour of Nov br 8 th the day after I last wrote you. I inclose the amount of your account with many thanks for your kindness— The Betsy is arrived with the fish, and if my cook can be taught to dress it, some of our Nothern Friends shall Toast your Health. The state of N Jersey as you observe, most certainly manifested a very marked respect and approbation of the...
On 16 November 1797 the Philadelphia Aurora General Advertiser printed the following squib: “His serene highness of Braintree made an anti-climax on his journey from his dukedom. Boston made the cap of the climax, Philadelphia its tail. On another occasion it would be safer and wiser to make no further attempts at forcing respect; for it sits aukwardly upon men, that from respect it...
I wrote you from East Chester and inclosed you 90 dollors to pay a Note in mr Frothinghams hands. I have not received a line in acknowledgment of the letter, which makes me a little anxious for its fate. you was so good as to Say you would send me Some salt fish. I should like a couple of kental to treat our good Massachusetts Friends. I will thank you to send it by one of the first vessels,...
I yesterday about 11 oclock went into the Presidents Room to see if John had returnd from the post office. my good Gentleman was soberly Standing at the fire with your Letter open and very gravely reading it. I scolded and very soon carried it of. I thank you for all your communications. the P. says one of sister Cranchs Letters is worth half a dozen others. she allways tells us so much about...
After an absence of near four Months I returned, to this City the last week. I am disposed to renew my correspondence with you, if you can find leisure to attend it. The fraternal regard and affection which for many years subsisted between you and my sons is not lessned by time, or diminished by absence, but I trust has grown ripened, and matured by age, and like the Affection of your parents...
Your Letters have become Such a model of elegant composition, that I cannot but think you must discover So many dificencies in my untoutord stile, that I feel a little anxious in Exposing it to your Eye. your desire however to obtain intelligence from your Native Land, and from the Friends, and Relatives you have Left there, will induce you to pass over with a less scrutinizing Eye the...
Since my residence at this place, now a Month, occasiond by the prevalence of the yellow fever in Philadelphia, I have had the pleasure to receive two Letters from you; one from the Hague june 26 th , the other from London july 29 th . the joint Letter you mention as having written, is not yet come to Hand. The Newspapers before I left Quincy, which was on the 2d of the last Month, had informd...
I have received but one Letter from you Since I left Quincy now near a Month; I have been here three weeks, except 3 days which I past at my sons in N york— next Monday I leave here for Philadelphia where it is thought we may now go with safety— I was in hopes to have taken Mrs smith with me, but her situation is difficult not having received any advise what to do, and She is loth to go for...
As you was absent when I left home I was unable to pay you for some articles which you had purchased for me, as well as some which mrs smith had procured for me. if you will be so good as to forward me the amount, I will transmit it to you— When I pay’d mr Fothingham for the Carriage, there were the quarter Lights and some other matters which made the carriage amount to more than our first...
I was in hopes to have seen you, and had some more conversation with you upon the subject of finishing the Room in the out House. I experienced so many inconveniencies from a mixture of Families Whilst I was at Home, that I should not wish to try it again, for if mr & mrs Porter had not been of a very accommodating disposition we should have met with more trouble than I did. I told mr Porter...
we arrived here on twesday Evening on the 11 th , after a pleasent journey in which we met with but few obstructions the Weather on one Day prevented our travelling, and we tarried on sunday at Hartford, and on Monday morning were escorted out of Town by a Troop of light Horse, and the citizens in carriages and on Horse back as far as Weathersfield. we proceed then for New Haven about 40 miles...
I acknowledg myself indebted to you for two kind Letters, both of which found me in circumstances of distress; the first which came to me before I went to Philadelphia, I fully intended to have replied to at the Time, but the many cares and avocations which at that time occupied my mind, preparitory to my going, and the peculiar melancholy circumstance of the Death of my Mother and Neice...
I last Evening received your Letter of the 19 & 20 th Instant. I am most sincerely grieved for the melancholy situation of our Nephew, and the more so as it is not in my power to render him any personal assistance. Since my return from Haverhill I have thought it necessary to return the civilities received, which has obliged me to entertain weekly several sets of company and that with a Family...
I arrived here this day week, but have been so constantly occupied in seeing company that I have not had time to write a single Line. I received your Letter which I suppose had been on to Philadelphia, on fryday last, in the full Faith that mr Peabody & you would comply with our request. I took the Children, and brought them with me. John is somewhat indisposed with a return of his Ague— I...
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
We are thus far on our Way to N England if no accident happens to prevent us. I hope on thursday of next week to sleep at williams at Malbourough, and to dine at Watertown on fryday. We escaped from N york with less parade than was intended, tho we were not less sensible to the politeness and civility of the inhabitants who were disposed to do us every honour both civil and Military. the first...
The weather is Hot as we can bear the whole city is like a Bake House. we have a House with large and airy Rooms, or I could not sustain it I do bear it surprizingly well however, tho I long for a sea Breaze. I hope to leave here on monday and get on to Bristol 18 miles the first night. I shall want Several things put in order at home for our reception when I once get on my journey. I shall...
I received your Letter of July 12. I am inclined to think your last determination will prove a judicious one. I most sincerely hope it will. The President expects to leave this city next week. we shall go Northward for a Month or two. I could have wisht that my Health would have permitted me, to have visited the new city at this season; but the Heat is so great that I dare not make the...
If the Compass by which my course is directed does not vary again through unavoidable necessity I shall sit out for Quincy next week. we shall probably be 12 days in comeing. I shall want some preparation at Home. I will write to you from N york. Betsy wrote to her Mother to know if her sister Nancy was at home & that I should want her during my stay at Quincy The Hot weather of july has...
Tis expectation that make a Blessing sweet, says the poet. how sincerely sweet would it be to me to fold my dear Thomas to my Maternal Bosom in his own Native Land. I hope and wish, wish & hope that the Day may not be far distant.— This Day, the 14 of July I received by way of N york your kind Letter of April 7 th , more than 3 months Since it was written, from your Brother no one of a later...
Gen’ll Marshal expects to sail tomorrow Several Days sooner than I expected, and the weather has been so very Hot, that I have not had resolution to touch my pen for several days past. you recollect what the Month of July is in this place, and how severely I feel, and suffer from the Heat. I wrote to you about a fortnight since by the British Packet, Captain Cathcart, but I am so hamperd that...
Your kind Letter of June 8th gave great pleasure to the President, as well as to your Friend. We were happy to learn so good an arrangement of our Domestick concerns. I then hoped to have come to Quincy for a Month or two. some difficulties arise from the procecution of that plan, tho it is the place of all others which the President seems most desirious of visiting We could not be...
Mr otis will tell you all the News in this quarter of the Earth, where Wickedness abounds of all kinds. I hope however there may be found Rightous sufficient to save the city. we have a senator—you see by his Letter what he is capable of. the Government is not found sufficently strong to punish him according to his Demerrits, or he would not have been permitted to have escaped, nor do I think...
I got through the 4 July with much more ease than I expected. it was a fine cool day, and my fatigue arose chiefly from being drest at an early hour, and receiving the very numerous Sets of company who were so polite as to pay their compliments to me in succession in my drawing Room after visiting the President below, and partaking of cake wine & punch with him. to my company were added the...
I received your favour of June 26 th , and rejoice with you in the Birth of an other son, and in the safety and Health of Mrs Cranch, to whom be so kind as to present my Regards. I have shewn your Letter to the President, and he desires me to tell you, that he would not have you on any account, be the least detered from persueing any line of buisness which shall appear eligible to you, or to...
Your favour of June 19 th I duly received indisposition has prevented my replying to you before. the President regreets the feeble and infirm state of Health which prevents his old and tried Friend from the acceptance of an Embassy he was personally so well qualified for. it was with great apprehensions from that circumstance only, that he made the nomination and the critical state of the...
The packet being detaind I write you a few Lines further to inform you that mr Marshal accepts his appointment, but Judge Dana declines on account of his Health The President accordingly has Nominated mr Gerry. the senate have not yet agreed to it. the N Englanders do not like this Nomination. You are so well acquainted with mr Gerry, and With his sentiments Principles conduct and services,...
I received your Letter of June 13 th. and thank you for it. the account you give me respecting my House and the Farm are very pleasing. I like your proposal of going to it and taking tea with my good Neighbours very much— I am very sorry to hear that mrs Beal is so unwell. I have feard that she would fall into a decline, for she has appeard to me, to look very unwell for many Months. she was a...
Your Friend Quincy is married, truly married and to a Nyork Lady, by the Name of Morten, without Beauty and without Money, but amply compensated by the accomplishments of her mind and the Virtues of her Heart, as I am informd, for I have not the pleasure of knowing her. Having told you this peice of News, I shall proceed and would acknowledge the date of your last Letter to me, but I...
I have not written a line to you for a long time; yet scarcly an hour of the day passes in which you are not present to my mind; I fear my last Letters were captured the ship, captain scott, was taken by the French. you will think me more tardy than I have really been. by the date of this you will see where I am. it was not my intention to have come here untill the Fall of the Year. I expected...
I have felt every day as if I was conscience smit for neglecting to write to you. I have been some encumberd with cares and ceremonies which tho not very pleasent, the custom of the World, and the state of society have made them necessary in publick Life. the sitting of congress has added to my cares, at a season of the Year when I should very gladly have dispenced with so much company as we...
Will you be kind as to see mr Frothingham and tell him that I wish him to have the Coachee cased, and put on Board the first vessel which sails for this place agreeing for the freight of it, before he puts it on Board I have a Leeding Brass Harniss at Quincy which I will write to have sent to mr Frothingham that the whole may come together. Dr Welch has in his Hands three hundred Dollors which...
I received your Letter by this days post I began to be anxious to hear from my Friends at Quincy. I cannot but say that I was astonishd at some of its contents. I could not believe that any Gentleman would have had so little delicacy or so small a sense of propriety as to have written a more vague opinion, and that of a Lady too, to be read in a publick assembly as an authority. the Man must...
Blessed are the Peace makers, says [a Good] Book, for which you and I, entertain the highest respect and reverence. I quote this benidiction to reconcile you to the appointment of your Best Ffriend, as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the French Republick. An appointment which all true Friends to their Country, and real Americans will rejoice in out of 28 Senators, there...
We yesterday received the Centinal. I thank you for the vindication which I found in it. I well knew how watchfull the Faction would be to lie in wait & catch at every Straw, misrepresenting and abusing every measure which was intended to secure us from foreign influence. the President waited a reasonable time for the answer of the House to his Speech, before he made his nominations to the...
The weather was so cold yesterday that we had fires in our Rooms. I suppose you have weather of a similar kind. we have had frequent showers and yesterday a fine rain. The House have at length got through the answer to the speech, 3 weeks debating whether, they should use the term indignation, or sensibility. the answer as reported and as finally agreed to, is a very handsome one, as well as a...
I keep up My old Habit of rising at an early hour. if I did not I should have little command of my Time at 5 I rise from that time till 8 I have a few leisure hours. at 8 I breakfast, after which untill Eleven I attend to my Family arrangements. at that hour I dress for the Day. from 12 untill two I receive company, sometimes untill 3. we dine at that hour unless on company days, which are...
most cordially welcome to me was your kind Letter of May the 4 th , yet I have not found time since my arrival to thank you for it, or even to write a Line to any Friend. my Journey was as pleasent as my thoughts upon what was past, and my anticipations of what was to come would permit it to be. we reachd East Chester on thursday noon and found mrs smith and Children well. my reflections upon...
we reachd here yesterday being thursday the 7 th day from leaving home. we had very bad Roads, the Rains having washd all the stones bare, and the ruts were very deep I was much fatigued; Brisler and Family went on to N york mrs Brisler much mended in her Health by her journey. I hope when we get over our fatigue we shall all be able to say so. Betsy does not seem the worse for it, tho I think...
Thus far am I on my journey. I hope to reach East Chester on thursday Evening, and one day I must pass there, and one in N york. on Monday I shall sit forward for Philadelphia, and could wish you to meet me at muckleroys to dinner on twesday, if agreable to you, of which you can inform me by post addrest to me at N york to be left at our Sons. Brisler will be home by Saturday Night or sunday...