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your kind and Friendly Letter found me in great affliction for the loss of my dear and only daughter, mrs smith She had been with me only three weeks having undertaken a journey from the State of N york , desirious once more to See her parents, and to close her days under the paternal roof She was accompanied by her Son and daughter , who made every exeertion to get her here, and gratify what...
Never mind it, my dear Sir, if I write four Letters to your one: your one is worth more than my four. It is true that I can Say and have Said nothing new on the Subject of Government. yet I did Say in my Defence and in my Discourses on Davila, though in an uncouth Style, what was new to Lock , to Harrington , to Milton , to Hume to Montesquieu to Reauseau , to Turgot , Condorcet
I take the Liberty of addressing you in behalf of my son, now at st petersburgh, and to ask of you, permission for his return to his native Country. I hope you may have already received, through the Secretary of State, his own request to this effect. From Several Letters which I have received from Mrs Adams, I have been led to think their Situation very unpleasent, as it respected their...
Had you been no other than the private inhabitant of Montecello, I should e’er this time have addrest you, with that sympathy, which a recent event has awakend in my Bosom. but reasons of various kinds withheld my pen, untill the powerfull feelings of my heart, have burst through the restraint, and called upon me to shed the tear of sorrow over the departed remains, of your beloved and...
I received your two Letters together of August 26 th . I have every day since designd to write to you, but have not been very well. I do not know the cause yet for many years, the Month of sep’ br has depressed my Spirits more than any other. I believe it always brings with it, some dregs of the old Ague and fever— I most sincerely mourn for the distressess of N york and Philadelphia; but know...
I received with much pleasure your Letters of August 1 st and 12th, for which accept my thanks. I read the papers as usual, and find the Ethiope washed white by the Necromancing powers of dallas & co— but I was not a little surprizd by the information which mr H G otis assured me, he received from a correspondent in Philadelphia, viz that our Friend Dr Rush and Mr Hartley of York Town were...
I received yours of the 21 July upon my return from a Ride. your Father said he had a Letter for me worth a thousand pounds I found it had been read; I complaind, but was told it was put in unseald, on purpose that it might be read. I had not any objection to its being seen, yet you know one chuses in such cases to be judge for themselves; I delight very much in your Letters. you have a...
Mr Houghten, an acquaintance of your Brother Thomas, call’d upon me last Evening, with the kind offer of taking Letters to you. I readily Embrace the opportunity, as it gives me the pleasure of sending you a Number of News papers, and two orations, neither of which stand in need of any Eulogy from me; they will proclaim their own Worth; and the public are not insensible to their merit. two...
I had the pleasure of seeing mr Peabody here, yesterday mor’g he got here the night before, but it was late, and I was gone to Bed, tho I had exceeded my usual Hour before the President arrived. he brought William with him. I think I do not feel my last Summers sickness in any way, so sensible, as by being languid, and wanting my rest at a particular Hour. if I vary much, I lose my sleep— I...
I know not how it is, but I always feel more spirits when I take my pen to write to you, than to any one else; I received a friendly Letter from dr Rush. the Good Gentleman endeavours to do away all the suspis he so innocently raised, and in doing it, your Father observed that it was ten to one. if he did not go to prateing to the Bishop or his daughters, and excite some Idea that he had been...
I received your Letter of June 21— I cannot but feel very anxious for your Health. the Hot season is fast approaching, and the city will soon become sickly. the feverish habit of which you complain, and which seems to be rivited to your constitution, will expose you to the disorders incident to the season; I have sufferd so much from the same complaint that I know full well how to sympathize...
It was with inexpresible pleasure that I yesterday read a Letter to your Father from you dated the 1[8] th of Feb’ ry . this is the first line which has reachd us from you; Since the return of your Brother; I have not any from you of a later date than sep’ br . by the last No. 7 or Eight of your Letters must be missing. one public Letter of december, was received from you, by the Secretary of...
I presume this will find you at Philadelphia, fix’d in your Lodgings; and in possession of your office, where I wish you much of the Good things of the world, tho purchased by toil & trouble, they may serve to enhance their value; above all worldly Goods. I wish you Health, for destitute of that great blessing, few others can be enjoyed. The few Hot days which we had in May, brought upon me...
I am much mortified and dissapointed that I cannot have the pleasure which I anticipated of visiting you with the Chilrdren on their Return to Atkinson. I was threatned last week with a return of the complaint under which I labourd last summer; but I was in hopes it would go of, and that a Ride would serve me but I have not found it so. my things were all put up yesterday to sit out, but I am...
This Letter will be deliverd to you by your son whom you will find improved in his Health, greatly I think— the weather has been so very bad—and the Roads almost impassiable Since his return, so that it has not been practicable to make you an earlier visit. I have been very anxious for your dear little Girl, whom I have frequently heard an unfavourable account of, but miss Palmers last Letter...
I am indebted to you for a very kind and friendly Letter by my son, to which I ought sooner to have replied, but I have been a poor correspondent for the last nine Months, through loss of sleep. My Head for more than half the time has felt in such a state of Langour and weakness that I have not been able either to write or read with comfort or satisfaction you who was witness to my situation...
Such extreem cold Weather I do not recollect to have felt in March, as it has been this week, and it has laid Thomas up with one of his Soar Throats & Rhumatism I hope however tho very threatning, that it will not be lasting; I am so well as to ride out, when the weather will permit, and able to look after my poor Lad, who I regreet has so much of his Mothers constitution & infirmities—...
I have been informd to day, that a paper from N york the daily advertizer was received in Town on saturday night, which states that the Senate have refused to concur in the nomination of mr Murrey, and congratulating the public upon it, that the Senate have offerd their Reasons, which are promised in the next Paper; We are told that [“]in a multitude of Counsellors their is safety” I cannot...
yesterday afternoon mr Greenleaf returnd from Boston, and as he, as well as my others Neighbours, are particuliarly attentive and kind, in bringing Letters and papers to me as well; as of communicating all New’s, he came full fraught, with the appointment of Mr Murrey Minister Plenipo to France, a measure which had astonishd all the Federilist; and was a subject of great speculation, in...
I have not any Letter from you of a later date than the 9th; you was then unwell. I have one from william of the 12th. as he does not mention your being still indisposed I hope it was only occasiond by the Thaw, and the close air of the Theatre. I have myself been confined for a week, but got down stairs yesterday, and hope I have parted with some of my bad humours , by the application of...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of three Letters from you since my last. your punctuality and attention deserve commendation; and claim a pardon for any inaccuracies of stile, or manner, which escape your pen. shall I tell you however what Thomas says? “this young man must aim at more accuracy of expression. he must not be slovenly I will take him to task.” you know his way, and I dare Say...
I cannot say that I write you from my Solitude, for who can call themselves Solitary, when in the society and company of a beloved son, who has been long absent, and who returns to his native Land, with a plentifull supply of the flowers and fruits which he has judiciously selected, from the various Countries into which he has traveld. he appears very happy surrounded by the Books in the...
upon the 12th, our dear Thomas reachd Quincy to my no small Joy! I am as happy in his company and Society, as you have been before me, and I bless God that he has returnd to his Native Country, an honest sober and virtuous citizen I hope he will continue an honour and a comfort to his Parent’s tho it is allotted them to experience different sensations with respect to one, of whose reformation...
I will not let a vessel sail for Hamburgh that I know of, without taking a few Lines from me, if it be only to inform you of the State of my Health, which I know you are affectionately interested in. It is not what I wish it was, tho by no means so low as in the summer past. your Brother is on his way to Quincy. I hope to see him in the course of the Week, and to disswade him from his present...
your observations in your last Letter, upon your Solitude; and your reflections upon your Age and feelings, led me to a train of Reflections, upon that period of Life to which we are both hastning, to that period when the wise man hath told us, no pleasure is to be found; That Frederick who was as great an unbeliever as Voltaire, should experience this truth in its full face, I can easily...
Is there no method my child you can persue to escape the constant colds to which you are subject it seems to me you have had a succession of them ever since you went to Philadelphia. have you had anything of the Rhumatism? we have had open thawy weather which has given me a touch of old times, a dumb Ague for the week past; I think the News papers might have given us a little more accurate...
It is with pleasure insepressible, I inform you of the safe arrival of your Brother Thomas at N york after a passage of 46 days. My Mind was relieved from a load of anxiety by this agreable intelligence from his own Hand. the danger from comeing upon our Coast in the Winter Season, and the severe and frequent snow storms we have experienced this winter kept me in a constant allarm for his...
I Received yours of the 16th on wedensday, and participated in the Joy and pleasure you must have experienced in meeting a dear and amiable son after a four years Seperation. how happy should I have been to have folded him at the same time to my Bosom, and felt a pleasure which the Childless, can never experience. I have already written both [. . .] you, and to him, respecting his comeing to...
I thank you my dear Nephew for your last agreable Letter. you have too sensible and feeling a heart not to participate in the pleasure which the Return of your cousin gives to his Parents and Friends. your account of his reception from his Father was too tender and interesting to my Heart, not to flow to my Eyes; I hope you will derive both instruction and improvement from him. you have a mind...
I received with Sincere pleasure the confirmation of your Safe arrival in your Native Land, from under your own Hand yesterday by post. oweing to Bad Roads, the post from N york did not arrive untill twesday, tho due on saturday. I had written to you, as you will find by the first Mail after I heard of your arrival, and tho I should most affectionately rejoice to see you soon, I shall not urge...
I give you joy of the safe arrival of our dear Thomas; whom you will have cordially received before this reaches you; I shall be happy to see him as early as will be convenient for him; but if it is thought best that he should remain a while with you; I shall acquiese, now I have reason to believe him in safety. I hope his Health has not sufferd from his winters Voyage I shall the more readily...
I Congratulate you my dear son, upon your safe arrival in your Native Country; and myself that I have the prospect of seeing you again, a prospect which for many Months I had no hopes of realizing, as your Father can inform you, and to the very low state of my Health, it is oweing that I cannot so soon as I wish enjoy the pleasure of Welcomeing you Home; and meeting you at Philadelphia, where...
I received yesterday your Letter of Jan’ry 6th, with the News papers to the 7th Clapole excepted; which usually has the first debates, so that I got no debate later than I received on saturday of the 5th However inaccurate the Printers may report the debates in Philadelphia: is best known to those who deliver, and those who hear them. when curtaild, and retaild by our Printers they are...
your Aunt Cranch received a Letter from your Mother of Jan ry 1st in which she makes mention of having received a Letter from you: I wrote to her soon after she returnd Home, and sent the Letter to Boston. it was given to some private hand, and never has reachd her. I have since written to her by the post. She and your sister were well, and Abbes Arm much better for the application of Hughes...
Yesterday in high stile with his Carriage and four, His Honor the Lieut Govenour made me a visit. this is the first notice I have received of his Gaurdianship. he desired I would inform the President that he had been here, as he had promised him that he would take care of me. I told him I should certainly comply with his request; the seeing me for the first Time, since the loss of Mrs Gill,...
I received your Letters of Dec br 31 & Jan’ry the 1 st I am sorry that it should fall to your Lot to nominate Col smith again, and that to a lower Grade than, as a soldier he merrits. I think however that he was placed in a difficult situation. if he had rejected the offer, those who have stiled him a Jacobin, would have attributed it to motives unfriendly to his Country, but as a Man...
I believe it was in some such cold weather as the present, that Solomon made the wise inquiry observation, if two lie together, they shall be warm, but how can one be warm alone? now if he had had such a Bedfellow as Louissa, he might have found, that two might lie together, and yet be cold, for I am sure I felt half frozen last night. Ever since thursday the weather has been most severely...
I received yesterday mor’g by Plimouth stage, your Letter of 28th december, together with the Bundle mrs Brisler sent, and two News papers—one by mistake was an old one, the other containd part of the debate upon mr Griswolds Resolution. the old clan keep up their opposition, Brainless as it is. I am glad to see them reduced to so small a Number, and as their Yea , must always be suspicious...
Rejoice o young Man in thy youth, and let thy Heart Cheer thee. this is the language of Soloman. Youth is therefore the season of rejoicing, nor can there be any thing more suitable, provided that joy is temperate, moderate and Rational. The old year is closed upon us, and a New one commenced; we have abundant cause for thankfullness and rejoicing; our Lives are still preserved, whilst...
I cannot give you any account of Thomas I have sought for him by capt Jenkins. the Barbara which saild at the same time was a better vessel, well armd. mr smith thought it probable he would prefer her, as she was for Boston. I joind him in the same opinion, and was not a little distresst in the storm on saturday Evening to hear that she had been cast away on saturday morning near Salem, but at...
If you have once more set your foot upon American ground, and are in safety, God be praised I have sufferd great anxiety for you, knowing your intention of comeing this winter. you may well suppose my Heart Leaped for Joy when I found that Captain Jenkins was safely arrived. I for three days, was expecting to see you, but upon writing to mr smith for intelligence I could not get any concerning...
I have not written to you for a long time it was my intention to have written by miss Palmer, but she went away a week earlier than she proposed when I saw her. she could however tell you that I was in better Health than when you left me. I have recoverd my Rest, and with it my strength and spirits have returnd in a great measure. I sent Richard Dexter to Philadelphia tho I have not yet had...
on twesday Evening I received the Mercury, and read in it, the arrival of Capt Jenkins in the America, on sunday. you may well suppose I felt greatly rejoiced expecting from Thomas’s Letter, that he was undoubtedly a passenger. no mention was however made of him in the paper: I expected for two days to hear of him, then I conjectured that not knowing of my being here, was the reason of my not...
I inclose you the Letter which gave me every reason to expect that Thomas was on Board Capt Jenkins. as he is not mentiond, and I have not heard any thing, I am fearfull he did not come. perhaps capt Jenkins may know in what vessel he took his passage it is very painfull to be daily expecting a Friend, at this Season of the year. one cannot help having much anxiety The conduct of Dr W h is...
I believe our Legislatures when they made the House tax were not aware of the trouble attendant upon the execution of it. to measure every House Barn out House count every square of Glass, collect every peice of Land, and its bounds—and then apprize the whole, is a Labour indeed. I have had the Gentlemen here the last week, and they have with the assistance of your Brother gone through yours—...
I was much obliged to you for sending me the answer to Barlows Letter. our Printers in Boston are very inattentive to many publications which would be usefull whilst they print very purile peices— Barlows Letter made its first appearence the last week in the Centinal. I design it shall be succeeded by the replie, tho I think it a very partial one and that it treats Barlow with much more...
you are very good dear William in your attentions towards me, and I receive the papers regularly which will now become more interesting as Congress proceed in buisness. yours of the 10 & 12 of december I have received this week. the Aurora shows that tho Bache is dead, he yet speaketh, or rather that the party which supported him, are determined to have a press devoted to them. whether the...
I received the Centinal last Evening and found by it that the two Houses were formed and that a committe had waited upon you; that you could not as usual attend upon the day following oweing to indisposition. You will easily suppose that I must feel very anxious from reading this; because I know a Slight indisposition would not detain you; I have a Letter from you of the 4 th of December. you...
I received this week as many packets by the Mail as a minister of state. they however containd nothing except the News papers which you have been very puntual in forwarding. Browns I can dispence with, you need not send it again unless any thing interesting, in it, which the rest do not contain. Peters I hope will have less of the Bilingsgate when Congress sit, and Fennos I hope to see in the...
I received yours of 28 th of Nov’ br I have not faild of writing to you once a week ever since you left me, and I believe twice, tho the Letters may not reach you, so regularly as I wish. I have kept you informd of our Movements. mr Porter & French compleated last night getting Home the whole of our Timber, Boards, and shingles of the Boards there are more than 30 thousand, and near 50...