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I hope if the Marquiss de la Fayette is returned to Paris he may be able to give us some account of Colln. Smith for whom we are not a little anxious, having no intelligence from him since the begining of September when he wrote that he should tarry at Berlin till the reviews were over which would be by the 20th. of that month and then should make the utmost expedition to Paris where his stay...
Mr. Trumble will have the honour of delivering this to you. The knowledge you have of him, and his own merit will ensure him a favourable reception. He has requested a Letter from me, and I would not refuse him, as it gives me an opportunity of paying my respects to a Gentleman for whom I entertain the highest esteem, and whose portrait dignifies a part of our room , tho it is but a poor...
If I had thought you would so soon have Sent for your dear little Girl, I should have been tempted to have kept her arrival here, from you a secret. I am really loth to part with her, and she last evening upon petit’s arrival, was thrown into all her former distresses, and bursting into Tears, told me it would be as hard to leave me, as it was her Aunt Epps. She has been so often deceived that...
Mr. Adams has already written you that we arrived in London upon the 27 of May . We journey’d slowly and sometimes silently. I think I have somewhere met with the observation that nobody ever leaves paris but with a degree of tristeness. I own I was loth to leave my garden because I did not expect to find its place supplied. I was still more loth on account of the increasing pleasure, and...
If I had thought you would so soon have sent for your dear little Girl, I should have been tempted to have kept her arrival here, from you a secret. I am really loth to part with her, and she last evening upon Petit’s arrival, was thrown into all her former distresses, and bursting into Tears, told me it would be as hard to leave me as it was her Aunt Epps. She has been so often deceived that...
Col. Humphries talks of leaving us on monday. It is with regret I assure you Sir that we part with him. His visit here has given us an opportunity of becomeing more acquainted with his real worth and merit, and our friendship for him has risen in proportion to our intimacy. The two American Secretaries of Legation would do honour to their Country placed in more distinguishd stations. Yet these...
Mr. Adams being absent I replie to your Letter this day received, that Mr. Adams has written to you upon the subject you refer to. Our time here is short and pressing. Yet short as it is Mr. Adams is obliged to Set out on fryday for the Hague in order to take leave there. Owing wholy to the neglect of Congress in omitting to send him a Letter of recall, tho he particularly requested it of...
I received by Col Franks Your obliging favour and am very sorry to find your wrist Still continues lame. I have known very Salutary effects produced by the use of British oil upon a spraind joint. I have Sent a Servant to See if I can procure some. You may rest assured that if it does no good: it will not do any injury. With regard to the Tumults in my Native state which you inquire about, I...
The Gentleman who is so kind as to convey this to you is from Carolina, his Name is Smith. He is a distant relation of mine, tho I have not the pleasure of much acquaintance with him. He has resided in England some time, and bears a Good Character here. Give me leave sir to introduce him to your notice. Mr. Short left us last twesday for the Hague, I did myself the honour of writing to you by...
Col. Humphries talks of leaving us on Monday. It is with regret, I assure you, Sir, that we part with him. His visit here has given us an opportunity of becoming more acquainted with his real worth and merit, and our friendship for him has risen in proportion to our intimacy. The two American Secretaries of Legation would do honor to their country placed in more distinguished stations. Yet...
The Gentleman who is so kind as to convey this to you is from Carolina, his name is Smith. He is a distant relation of mine, tho I have not the pleasure of much acquaintance with him. He has resided in England some time, and bears a good Character here. Give me leave Sir to introduce him to your notice. Mr. Short left us last Tuesday for the Hague. I did myself the honour of writing to you by...
Your very polite favour was handed me by Colo. Franks. I am much obliged to you for the execution of the several commissions I troubled you with. Be assured sir that I felt myself Honourd by your commands, tho I have only in part executed them. For I could not find at any store table Cloths of the dimensions you directed. The width is as you wisht, but they assure me that four yds. and three...
Mr. Fox a young gentleman from Philadelphia who came recommended by Dr. Rush to Mr. Adams, will have the Honour of delivering you this Letter. We requested him to call upon Mr. Stockdale for your papers &c. Mr. Adams is unwell, and will not be able to write you by this opportunity. I am to acquaint you sir that Dr. Price has transacted the business respecting Mr. Hudon. The Money is paid, but...
Your very polite favour was handed me by Col. Franks. I am much obliged to you for the execution of the several commissions I troubled you with. Be assured sir that I felt myself Honourd by your commands, tho I have only in part executed them, for I could not find at any store table Cloths of the dimensions you directed. The width is as you wisht, but they assure me that four yds and three...
The publick Advertiser— Yesterday Lord Gerge Gordon had the Honour of a long conference with his Excellency John Adams, (honest John Adams) the Ambassador of America, at the hotel of Mons. de Lynden Envoye extraodinaire de Leurs Hautes Puissances. This is true, and I suppose inserted by his Lordship who is as wild and as enthusiastic as when he headed the Mob. His Lordship came here but not...
your kind and Friendly Letter found me in great affliction for the loss of my dear and only daughter, mrs smith She had been with me only three weeks having undertaken a journey from the State of N york , desirious once more to See her parents, and to close her days under the paternal roof She was accompanied by her Son and daughter , who made every exeertion to get her here, and gratify what...
your obliging favours of july and August came safe to Hand. the first was brought during my absence on an excursion into the Country. I was very happy to find by it, that you had received your daughter safe, and that the dear Girl was contented. I never felt so attached to a child in my Life on so short an acquaintance, tis rare to find one possessd of so strong & lively a sensibility. I hope...
I hope if the Marquiss de la Fayette is returned to Paris he may be able to give us some account of Colln. Smith for whom we are not a little anxious, having no intelligence from him since the begining of September when he wrote that he should tarry at Berlin till the reviews were over which would be by the 20th. of that month and then should make the utmost expedition to Paris where his stay...
Mrs. Adams presents her respectfull compliments to Mr. Jefferson and asks the favour of him to permit petit to purchase for her ten Ells of double Florence of any fashionable coulour, orange excepted which is in high vogue here. Mrs. A. excepts green also of which she has enough. Mr. Muchier if in paris will be so kind as to take charge of it, and Mrs. Adams will send the money by Mr. Trumble...
in the midst of the Bustle and fatigue of packing, The parade & ceremony of taking leave at Court, and else where, I am informd that mr Appleton and mrs Parker, are to set out for Paris tomorrow morning. I Cannot permit them to go without a few lines to my much Esteemed Friend, to thank him for all his kindness and Friendship towards myself and Family, from the commencment of our acquaintance,...
I have to congratulate you upon the safe arrival of your Little Daughter, whom I have only a few moments ago received. She is in fine Health and a Lovely little Girl I am sure from her countanance, but at present every thing is strange to her, and she was very loth to try New Friends for old. She was so much attachd to the Captain and he to her, that it was with no small regret that I...
In the midst of the Bustle and fatigue of packing, the parade and ceremony of taking leave at Court, and else where, I am informed that Mr. Appleton and Mrs. Parker are to set out for Paris tomorrow morning. I Cannot permit them to go without a few lines to my much Esteemed Friend, to thank him for all his kindness and Friendship towards myself and Family, from the commencement of our...
I had the Honour of addressing you yesterday and informing you of the safe arrival of your daughter. She was but just come when I sent of my Letter by the post, & the poor little Girl was very unhappy being wholy left to strangers this however lasted only a few Hours, & miss is as contented to day as she was misirable yesterday. She is indeed a fine child. I have taken her out to day and...
I would not omit so good an opportunity as presents by Mr. Short, of continuing the correspondence which you have done me the honour to Say you consider as settled. Your obliging favours of june 21 and july 7th were punctually deliverd, and afforded me much pleasure. Were you to come to this Country, as I sincerely hope you will, for the sake of your American Friends who would rejoice to see...
When I wrote you last I did not know that petit had taken places in the Stage & paid for them. this being the case I have represented it to your little daughter & endeavourd to prevail with her to consent to going at the time appointed; She says if I must go I will, but I cannot help crying, so pray dont ask me too. I should have taken great pleasure in presenting her to you here, as you would...
I would not omit so good an opportunity as presents by Mr. Short, of continuing the correspondence which you have done me the honour to Say you consider as settled. Your obliging favours of june 21 and july 7th were punctually deliverd, and afforded me much pleasure. Were you to come to this Country, as I sincerely hope you will, for the sake of your American Friends who would rejoice to see...
Mrs Adams presents her respectfull compliments to Mr Jefferson and asks the favour of him to permit petit to purchase for her ten Ells of double Florence of any fashionable coulour, orange excepted which is in high vogue here. Mrs A excepts green also of which she has enough. Mr Rucker if in Paris will be so kind as to take Charge of it, & mrs Adams will send the money by mr Trumble who will...
£ s d to 2 peices of Irish linen at 4s. pr. yd. 8 14 0 to making 12 Shirts at 3s. pr Shirt 1 16 0 to buttons thread silk 0 3 0 to Washing 0 3 6 a Trunk
Your favours by Colln. Smith and by the Baron Polintz came safe to hand. As you have justly estimated the Worth and merit of the former, you will easily suppose we were very glad to see him, and equally so to wellcome Colln. Humphryes upon English Ground. I hope his reception here will be as agreeable to him as he expected. He will inform you I dare say that he has seen both the Lions, and His...
[ London, 12 Aug. 1785. Record in SJL of its receipt on 23 Sep. 1785 reads: “Mrs. Adams’s. Grosvenor sq. Lond. Aug. 12. by W. Short.” Not found; see Abigail Adams to TJ, 21 Aug. 1785 .]
Mr Trumble will have the honour of d elivering this to you, the knowledge you have of him, and his own merit will ensure him a favourable reception. He has requested a Letter from me, and I would not refuse him, as it gives me an opportunity of paying my respects to a Gentleman for whom I entertain the highest esteem, and whose Portrait dignifies a part of this room, tho it is but a poor...
Mrs. Adams’s compliments to Mr. Jefferson and in addition to her former memorandum she requests half a dozen pr. of mens silk stockings. Mr. Trumble will deliver to Mr. Jefferson four Louis and one Guiney. Mr. parker will be so good as to take charge of them, if no opportunity offers before his return. RC ( DLC ). Not recorded in SJL , but certainly received on 19 Dec. when Trumbull arrived...
I received by Col. Franks your obliging favour and am very sorry to find your wrist still continues lame; I have known very salutary effects produced by the use of British oil upon a spraind joint. I have sent a servant to see if I can procure some. You may rest assured that if it does no good: it will not do any injury. With regard to the Tumults in my Native state which you inquire about, I...
Your favours by Colln. Smith and by the Baron Polintz came safe to hand. As you have justly estimated the Worth and merit of the former, you will easily suppose we were very glad to see him, and equally so to wellcome Colln. Humphryes upon English Ground. I hope his reception here will be as agreeable to him as he expected. He will inform you I dare say that he has seen both the Lions, and His...
Mr. Adams has already written you that we arrived in London upon the 27 of May. We journey’d slowly and sometimes silently. I think I have somewhere met with the observation that nobody ever leaves Paris but with a degree of tristeness. I own I was loth to leave my Garden because I did not expect to find its place supplied. I was still more Loth on account of the increasing pleasure, and...
Your obliging favours of july and August came safe to Hand. The first was brought during my absence on an excursion into the Country. I was very happy to find by it, that you had received your daughter safe, and that the dear Girl was contented. I never felt so attached to a child in my Life on so short an acquaintance. Tis rare to find one possessd of so strong and lively a sensibility. I...
When I wrote you last I did not know that petit had taken places in the Stage and paid for them. This being the case I have represented it to your little daughter and endeavourd to prevail with her to consent to going at the time appointed. She says if I must go I will, but I cannot help crying so pray dont ask me to. I should have taken great pleasure in presenting her to you here, as you...
Mr. Fox a young Gentleman from Philadelphia who came recommended by Dr. Rush to Mr. Adams, will have the Honour of delivering you this Letter. We requested him to call upon Mr. Stockdale for your papers &c. Mr. Adams is unwell, and will not be able to write you by this opportunity. I am to acquaint you Sir that Dr. Price has transacted the buisness respecting Mr. Hudon. The Money is paid, but...
I should not so soon have ventured to interrupt your more important avocations by an other Scrible, having writen you a few Days since, if it was not to inform you of the loss of your Letters by Mr. Preston. He says that when he landed at Dover, he was very sick, and that he could not accompany his trunk to the Custom House, into which for security he had put his Letters, but upon his arrival...
I had the Honour of addressing you yesterday and informing you of the safe arrival of your daughter. She was but just come when I sent of my letter by the post, and the poor little Girl was very unhappy being wholy left to strangers. This however lasted only a few Hours, and Miss is as contented to day as she was misirable yesterday. She is indeed a fine child. I have taken her out to day and...
I cannot omit by this opportunity acquainting you that on Sunday the August packet arrived in which came Mr. Church and brought us Letters from our son to our no small joy. He arrived the 17 of july after a very tedious passage. He was however in good Health and Spirits. Mr. Adams has at Length received some Letters from the president, from Mr. Jay and a private Letter from Mr. Gerry, together...
Never mind it, my dear Sir, if I write four Letters to your one: your one is worth more than my four. It is true that I can Say and have Said nothing new on the Subject of Government. yet I did Say in my Defence and in my Discourses on Davila, though in an uncouth Style, what was new to Lock , to Harrington , to Milton , to Hume to Montesquieu to Reauseau , to Turgot , Condorcet
I should not so soon have ventured to interrupt your more important avocations by an other Scrible, having writen you a few Days since, if it was not to inform you of the loss of your Letters by Mr. Preston. He says that when he landed at Dover, he was very sick, and that he could not accompany his trunk to the custom House, into which for Security he had put his Letters. But upon his arrival...
I have to congratulate you upon the safe arrival of your Little daughter, whom I have only a few moments ago received. She is in fine Health and a Lovely little girl I am sure from her countanance, but at present every thing is strange to her, & She was very loth to try New Friends for old. She was so much attachd to the Captain & he to her, that it was with no Small regreet that I Seperated...
Mr Adams being absent I replie to your Letter this day received, that mr Adams has written to you upon the Subject you refer to. our time here is short and pressing, yet short as it is mr Adams is obliged to Set out on fryday for the Hague in order to take leave there, owing wholy to the neglect of Congress in omitting to send him a Letter of Recall, tho he particuliarly requested it of them,...
I cannot omit by this opportunity acquainting you that on sunday the August packet arrived in which came Mr. Church and brought us Letters from our Son to our no Small joy. He arrived the 17 of july after a very tedious passage. He was however in good Health and spirits. Mr. Adams has at Length received Some Letters from the President from Mr. Jay and a private Letter from Mr. Gerry, together...