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    • Adams, Abigail
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    • Cranch, Mary Smith

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail" AND Recipient="Cranch, Mary Smith"
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I have just sent some Letters to go by Captain Folger, but find he does not sail so soon as captain Cushing. Should he arrive before Folger without a Line I know by experience how fruitfull your imaginition would be of conjectures, and tho I have said all that appeard to me of importance, & perhaps more than others will think of any, in my Letters on Board Folger, I forgot to inclose a paper...
As captain Folger is not yet gone I write a few more lines by him, tho I have nothing new to acquaint you with, only that two days ago my little darling was inoculated for the Small pox. if whenever you come to have Grandchildren, you will scarcly know any difference between them & your own children, particularly if you should be under the same roof with them; I have got mr Jenks to take the...
I heard to Day that the Doctor had a Letter from Mr. Cranch, and that he was still very Ill, poor Man. I am grieved for him, and for you my dear Sister, who I know share with him in all his troubles. It seem s worse to me when I hear you are unwell now than it used to, when I could go and see you. Tis a hard thing to be weaned from any thing we Love, time nor distance has not yet had that...
I was yesterday at Weymouth where I received your Letter, and the saffron risbands &c. I thank you and Cousin Betsy both; I expect you a thursday, but from all I can find out, I do not think the visit will be to any purpose; there seems to me to be at present a real aversion to change of state. having quited one has no inclination for an other; so things look to me. I am really sorry upon all...
If the Compass by which my course is directed does not vary again through unavoidable necessity I shall sit out for Quincy next week. we shall probably be 12 days in comeing. I shall want some preparation at Home. I will write to you from N york. Betsy wrote to her Mother to know if her sister Nancy was at home & that I should want her during my stay at Quincy The Hot weather of july has...
on the 17 of this Month cousin William wrote his uncle, that he had carried his cousin Tom Home to Braintree with the Symptoms of the Measles upon him; you will easily Suppose that I waited for the next post with great anxiety but how was I dissapointed last Evening when mr Adams returnd from Town, and the Roads being very bad the post had not arrived. I could not content myself without...
I have received but one Letter from you Since I left Quincy now near a Month; I have been here three weeks, except 3 days which I past at my sons in N york— next Monday I leave here for Philadelphia where it is thought we may now go with safety— I was in hopes to have taken Mrs smith with me, but her situation is difficult not having received any advise what to do, and She is loth to go for...
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
I arrived here last Night. my first inquiry was for a Letter from you, which I was happy enough to find, and great relief did it afford to my anxious mind. I sent to the post office to see if I could get any further intelligence last evening but was dissapointed. I am ready however to attribute it more to your not getting an opportunity of conveyance than to any unfavourable circumstance, and...
We left Philadelphia on Wedensday last, the day preceeding was very Hot a partial Rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent, we were overtaken by showers—and detaind by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain, troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, so much so as to nearly...