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    • Adams, Abigail
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    • Cranch, Mary Smith
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail" AND Recipient="Cranch, Mary Smith" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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This day is the Aniversary of my Landing in Boston and Tomorrow that of my departure from it. many are the mercies I have to be thankfull for through all my Perigranations, all the painfull scenes I have past through, has been the temporary seperation from my Friends, fatigue either of Body or Mind I scarcly name amongst them for I have my pleasures and gratifications which I set down as a...
I received your kind Letter of march eleventh yesterday. I wrote to you last week which was the first time I had been permitted to use my pen, or indeed was able too, for six weeks. I have not yet been out of my chamber. the weather has been very unfavourable this Month. I was to have tried the carriage to day but the weather is against me. I am so feeble & faint, if I move that I do not think...
I wrote you from Providence some account of my polite reception there & closed my Letter just as I had accepted an invitation to dine with mr Brown & Lady. the forenoon was pass’t in receiving visits from all the principal gentlemen and Ladies of the Town, who seemed to vie with each other, to convince me that tho they were inhabitants of an Antifederal state. they were themselves totally...
I received your kind Letter by mr Brisler who reachd here on the 4th of july, Since which you will easily suppose I have been very buisily engaged in arraneging my Family affairs. this added to the intence heat of the season Some company (tho for three days I was fashionably not at Home,) and some visiting which was indispensable, having more than fifty upon my list, my Time has been so wholy...
on the 17 of this Month cousin William wrote his uncle, that he had carried his cousin Tom Home to Braintree with the Symptoms of the Measles upon him; you will easily Suppose that I waited for the next post with great anxiety but how was I dissapointed last Evening when mr Adams returnd from Town, and the Roads being very bad the post had not arrived. I could not content myself without...
If I should ask why I have not heard from my sister or Friends, for several weeks past, would she not answer me by retorting the question? in replie I could only say that I had designd writing every day for a long time, but we have had such a lassitude of weather, and such a long continuence of it, that I have really felt unfit for every thing which I was not necessitated to perform, & for...
I last Evening received your Letter of 28 th of Febry which relieved my mind from a great weight of anxiety. I do not think that I have been so long a period, without Letters from some, or other of my Friends Since I first came to Newyork, or elsse the anxiety I have been under for several weeks appeard to prolong the Time I have written to you 3 weeks Successively but you do not mention...
I was in hopes of hearing from you by last Nights post, as I am solicitious to learn how mrs Norten does. I had Letters from Thomas and find that he is returnd to Cambridge very well he says, and he gives me the agreeable News of his Aunt shaws having got well to Bed with a daughter added to her Family. I have been anxious for her; as her Health is so slender, and I know how to feel for you...
I arrived here last Night. my first inquiry was for a Letter from you, which I was happy enough to find, and great relief did it afford to my anxious mind. I sent to the post office to see if I could get any further intelligence last evening but was dissapointed. I am ready however to attribute it more to your not getting an opportunity of conveyance than to any unfavourable circumstance, and...
I Received your kind Letters and meant sooner to have replied to them, but many avocations have prevented me. I am fully apprizd of all you mention in your Letter respecting your situation and wanted no apoligies for your conduct, but I still insist upon what I first wrote you, & it will pain me to hear you say any thing more upon the subject I never could apply it more to my satisfaction, I...