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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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Since my residence at this place, now a Month, occasiond by the prevalence of the yellow fever in Philadelphia, I have had the pleasure to receive two Letters from you; one from the Hague june 26 th , the other from London july 29 th . the joint Letter you mention as having written, is not yet come to Hand. The Newspapers before I left Quincy, which was on the 2d of the last Month, had informd...
It was with a mixture of pleasure and pain that I read your Letter of December 25th from Berlin No 32— it gave me pleasure to see your Hand writing addrest to me, after a painfull interval of three months Some of your communications were attended with circumstances which gave me pain, and anxiety, for my dear Louissa, whose situation under the circumstances you describe; must have been...
I embrace this opportunity by mr Thornton Secretary to mr Liston the British Minister to write too you, and to Send you two Speeches upon the Foreign intercourse Bill, one by mr Gallatin, and one in reply, by mr Harper. I wrote to you last week by Way of Hamburgh: but we are still without a line from you of a private Nature; and have only learnt of your arrival at Berlin from your Letters to...
mr Thorntons stay has been protracted much beyond the time I expected, and it gives me an other opportunity of adding to what I have already written, and of sending you the Printed coppy of the instructions given to our Envoys. the liberality of them has extorted acknowledgments from the minority, that they were eaquel to their most sanguine wishes, and satisfied many who had been imposed upon...
The vessel which was up for Hamburgh by which I promised to write has changed her Voyage, and the vessel for London is just upon the point of sailing, so that I have only time to inform you that your old Friend William Vans Murray is appointed your successer. This will give you pleasure, because he is a sensible Worthy Man, and a firm Friend to his Country. You will now be released, and...
Thus has my son given me a legal right to address you. I feel also, that I have an affectionate right devolved to me from him, to stile you thus. it would have given me great pleasure to have embraced you as Such in America, but as it has been otherways ordered, I must submit to that destiny which has through the greater part of my Life seperated me from my dearest connections. I feel a tender...
When I have written to your Brother I feel as if I had exhausted all the subjects which it is proper for me to write upon, but as your Hand writing allways gives me pleasure tho I see it only upon the superscription of a Letter, or in a few Promissory lines in the cover, I judge you will allways be gratified with a few words from me tho they contain no more than a Bullitin of our Health and...
To know that one Cannot freely say that Black, is Black; even tho it be “darkness visible,” or that white is white, tho the new fallen snow is not purer, is fettering ones faculties, as well as restraining ones pen. Yet in such perilious Times as the present, freely to discuss motives which lead to measures, or to Characterize the Actors “who fret and Strut their hour upon the stage” would not...
Your Letters have become Such a model of elegant composition, that I cannot but think you must discover So many dificencies in my untoutord stile, that I feel a little anxious in Exposing it to your Eye. your desire however to obtain intelligence from your Native Land, and from the Friends, and Relatives you have Left there, will induce you to pass over with a less scrutinizing Eye the...
Your Friend Quincy is married, truly married and to a Nyork Lady, by the Name of Morten, without Beauty and without Money, but amply compensated by the accomplishments of her mind and the Virtues of her Heart, as I am informd, for I have not the pleasure of knowing her. Having told you this peice of News, I shall proceed and would acknowledge the date of your last Letter to me, but I...